NCTR Resources

Readings

 

Reconciliation and Residential Schools

 

Stolen Words (2017)      

Melanie Florence

Illustrated by Gabrielle Grimard

The story of the beautiful relationship between a little girl and her grandfather. When she asks her grandfather how to say something in his language – Cree – he admits that his language was stolen from him when he was a boy. The little girl then sets out to help her grandfather find his language again. This sensitive and warmly illustrated picture book explores the intergenerational impact of the residential school system that separated young Indigenous children from their families. The story recognizes the pain of those whose culture and language were taken from them, how that pain is passed down, and how healing can also be shared.

Published in Canada by Second Story Press

https://secondstorypress.ca/kids/stolen-words

–      Character Education; Empathy; Prejudice & Tolerance, History & Social Studies; Canadian History; First Nations & Indigenous Peoples; Government & Citizenship; Reflecting Diversity

My Heart Fills With Happiness (2016)

Monigue Gray Smith

Julie Flett

The sun on your face. The smell of warm bannock baking in the oven. Holding the hand of someone you love. What fills your heart with happiness? This beautiful board book, with illustrations from celebrated artist Julie Flett, serves as a reminder for little ones and adults alike to reflect on and cherish the moments in life that bring us joy.
International speaker and award-winning author Monique Gray Smith wrote My Heart Fills with Happiness to support the wellness of Indigenous children and families, and to encourage young children to reflect on what makes them happy.

Published By Orca Book Publishers

* Christie Harris Illustrated Children’s Literature Prize2017; Winner

Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Books of the Year 2017;

Girls of Summer Reading List; 2017

https://www.orcabook.com/My-Heart-Fills-with-Happiness-P1085.aspx

  • Happiness; Joy; Reflection; First Nations; Family; Love; Sharing; Celebration; Toddlers: Children; Feelings; Indigenous

 

Amik Loves School: A Story of Wisdom (2015)

Katherena Vermette

Illustrated by Irene Kuziw

Amik tells Moshoom about his wonderful school. Then his grandfather tells him about the residential school he went to, Much different from Amik’s School.  So Amik has an idea…

Amik Loves School is one book in The Seven Sacred Teachings Stories series.  The Seven Teaching of the Anishinaabe- love, wisdom, humility, courage, respect, honesty, and truth – are revealed in seven stories for children. Set in urban landscapes, Indigenous children tell familiar stories about home, school, and community.

Great ideas for using in the classroom can be found in the Teachers Guide for the Seven Sacred Teachings.

Published by Portage & Main Press

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/amik-loves-school/

  • Children’s Books; Indigenous Literature; read-A- Long eBooks; The Seven Sacred Teachings Stories series

 

Not My Girl (2014)

Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton

Illustrated by Gabrielle Grimard

Two years ago, Margaret left her Arctic home for the outsiders’ school. Now she has returned and can barely contain her excitement as she rushes towards her waiting family—but her mother stands still as a stone. This strange, skinny child, with her hair cropped short, can’t be her daughter. “Not my girl!” she says angrily. Margaret’s years at school have changed her. Now ten years old, she has forgotten her language and the skills to hunt and fish. She can’t even stomach her mother’s food. Her only comfort is in the books she learned to read at school. Gradually, Margaret relearns the words and ways of her people. With time, she earns her father’s trust enough to be given a dogsled of her own. As her family watches with pride, Margaret knows she has found her place once more. Based on the true story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, and complemented by evocative illustrations, Not My Girl makes the original, award-winning memoir, A Stranger at Home, accessible to younger children. It is also a sequel to the picture book When I Was Eight. A poignant story of a determined young girl’s struggle to belong.  It will both move and inspire readers everywhere.

When I was Eight (2013)

Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton

Illustrated by Liz Amini-Holmes

Olemaun is eight and knows a lot of things. But she does not know how to read. Ignoring her father’s warnings, she travels far from her Arctic home to the outsiders’ school to learn. 

Based on the true story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, and complemented by stunning illustrations, When I Was Eight makes the bestselling Fatty Legs accessible to younger readers. Now they, too, can meet this remarkable girl who reminds us what power we hold when we can read.

Published in Canada by Annick Press      

*Best Books for Kids and Teens, starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre; Recommended Reads List, Canadian Toy Testing Council; 2017 TD Summer Reading Club Recommended Reads List; Christie Harris Illustrated Children’s Literature Prize finalist; Cybils Award nomination

http://www.annickpress.com/When-I-Was-Eight             

  • Biography; Inuit; Indigenous Peoples; Arctic; School; Selfesteem; Abuse; Community; Prejudice; Courage/Bravery; Right vs. Wrong; Role reversal; Secrets; Society; History; Bullying; Memoir; Character

 

ShinChi’s Canoe (2008)

Written by Nicola I. Campbell

Illustrated by Kim Lafave

This moving sequel to the award-winning Shi-shi-etko tells the story of two children’s experience at residential school. Shi-shi-etko is about to return for her second year, but this time her six-year-old brother, Shin-chi, is going, too.

As they begin their journey in the back of a cattle truck, Shi-shi-etko tells her brother all the things he must remember: the trees, the mountains, the rivers and the salmon. Shin-chi knows he won’t see his family again until the sockeye salmon return in the summertime. When they arrive at school, Shi-shi-etko gives him a tiny cedar canoe, a gift from their father. The children’s time is filled with going to mass, school for half the day, and work the other half. The girls cook, clean and sew, while the boys work in the fields, in the woodshop and at the forge. Shin-chi is forever hungry and lonely, but, finally, the salmon swim up the river and the children return home for a joyful family reunion.

Published in Canada by House of Anansi

* Winner of the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award 2009, Short-listed for the Chocolate Lily Award, Picture Book 2008, Short-listed for the Governor General’s Literary Awards: Illustration 2008, Short-listed for the Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award (CCBC) 2009, Long-listed for the OLA Silver Birch Express 2009

https://houseofanansi.com/products/shin-chis-canoe

  • Historical; Canada; PostConfederation (1867-); People & Places; Native Canadian; Social Situations; New Experience

 

Shi-shi-etko (2005)

Nicola I. Campbell

Illustrated by Kim Lafave

In just four days, young Shi-shi-etko will have to leave her family and all that she knows to attend residential school. She spends her last days at home treasuring the beauty of her world — the dancing sunlight, the tall grass, each shiny rock, the tadpoles in the creek, her grandfather’s paddle song. Her mother, father and grandmother, each in turn, share valuable teachings that they want her to remember. And so Shi-shi-etko carefully gathers her memories for safekeeping.

Published in Canada by House of Anansi

* Winner of the Aboriginal Children’s Book of the Year (Co-Winner) 2006

Short-listed for the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award 2006

Long-listed for the Chocolate Lily Award 2006

Short-listed for the Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award (CCBC) 2006

Short-listed for the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award 2006

https://houseofanansi.com/products/shi-shi-etko

  • Historical; Canada; PostConfederation (1867-); People & Places; Native Canadian; Social Situations; New Experience

 

Cheyenne Again (2002)

Eve Bunting

Illustrated by Irving Toddy

In the late 1880s, a Cheyenne boy named Young Bull is taken from his parents and sent to a boarding school to learn the white man’s ways.

Published By HMH Books for Young Readers

https://www.amazon.com/Eve-Bunting-Cheyenne-Again-None/dp/B00HTJXH00

  • Biography; Inuit; Native Peoples; Aboriginal; Artic; Residential Schools; Identity; Community; Canadian Content; Family; Society; History

 

Arctic Stories (1998)

Michael  Arvaarluk Kusugak

Ten-year-old Agatha, an Inuit girl, is the reluctant heroine in this tapestry of Arctic tales set in the 1950s. Each tale has its origins in Kusugak’s own childhood experiences.

Published by Annick Press

*The Year’s best List

http://www.annickpress.com/Arctic-Stories

  • Animals; Artic; Canadian Content; Community; Courage/ Bravery; Games; Girls: Humour; Multicultural: Native People; Nature; Problem Solving, Role Reversal; Social Studies; Storytelling: Winter

 

Home to Medicine Mountain (1998)

Chiori Santiago

In the 1930s two young brothers are sent to a government-run Indian residential school — an experience shared by generations of Native American children. At these schools, children are forbidden to speak their native tongue and are taught to abandon their Indian ways.

Native American artist Judith Lowry’s illustrations are inspired by the stories she heard from her father and uncle. The lyrical narrative and compelling paintings blend memory and myth in this bittersweet story of the boys’ journey home one summer and the healing power of their culture.

Published by Children’s Boy Press (CA)

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1292853.Home_to_Medicine_Mountain 

  • Character Education, Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance, History & Social Studies, Canadian History, First Nations & Indigenous Peoples, Government & Citizenship, Reflecting Diversity

Indigenous History, Culture & Contemporary Topics

 

A Day With Yayah (2017)

Nicola I. Campbell

Illustrated by Julie Flett

A First Nations family goes out to forage for edibles in the woods. Grandmother passes down her knowledge of plant life. This picture book is set in the Nicola Valley, British Columbia.

Published in Canada byTrade wind Books

http://tradewindbooks.com/books/a-day-with-yahah/

  • Historical; Canada; PostConfederation (1867-); People & Places; Native Canadian; Social Situations; New Experience

 

The Chief: Mistahimaskwa:  Tales from Big Spirit Series (2016)

David A. Robertson

Illustrated by Scott B. Henderson

The Chief: Mistahimaskwa (Big Bear) is one book in the Tales from Big Spirit series by David Alexander Robertson from Highwater Press. Tales from Big Spirit is a unique seven-book graphic novel series that delves into the stories of seven great Indigenous heroes from Canadian history—some already well known and others who deserve to be. Designed to correspond to grades 4–6 social studies curriculums across Canada, these full colour graphic novels could be used in literature circles, novel studies, and book clubs to facilitate discussion of social studies topics.

Published By Portage and main Press

* Selected by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Inclusion in Best Books for Kids & Teens

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-chief-mistahimaskwa/

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature; Tales From Big Spirit

Kode’s Quest(ion): A Story of Respect (2015)

Katherena Vermette

Illustrated by Irene Kuziw

Kode knows many things, but she doesn’t know one thing: What does respect mean? Who will help her figure out the answer?

Kode’s Quest(ion) is one book in The Seven Teachings Stories series. The Seven Teachings of the Anishinaabe—love, wisdom, humility, courage, respect, honesty, and truth—are revealed in seven stories for children. Set in urban landscapes, Indigenous children tell familiar stories about home, school, and community.

Published by Portage and Main Press

* Selected for the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s best Books for Kids & Teens, Approved for Manitoba Classroom.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/kodes-question/

  • Children’s Books; Indigenous Literature; read-A- Long eBooks; The Seven Sacred Teachings Stories Series

 

Misaabe’s Stories (2015)

Katherena Vermette

Misaabe tells great stories — about trolls, and x-ray glasses, and secret agents, and his super-exciting life. But is real life so bad? The Seven Teaching of the Anishinaabe — love, wisdom, humility, courage, respect, honesty, and truth — are revealed in these seven stories for children. Set in an urban landscape with Indigenous children as the central characters, these stories about home and family will look familiar to all young readers.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Selected for the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s best Books for Kids & Teens, Approved for Manitoba Classroom.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/misaabes-stories/

  • Children’s Books; Indigenous Literature; Read-A- Long eBooks; The Seven Sacred Teachings Stories series

What Is The Truth Betsy?: A Story of Truth (2015)

Katherena Vermette

Illustrated by Irene Kuziw

Miskwaadesi is puzzled about the teaching Truth. But she knows more than she thinks she does. The Seven Teaching of the Anishinaabe — love, wisdom, humility, courage, respect, honesty, and truth — are revealed in these seven stories for children. Set in an urban landscape with Indigenous children as the central characters, these stories about home and family will look familiar to all young readers.

Published by Portage and Main Press

* Winner of McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award; Selected for the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s Best Books for Kids & Teens; Approved resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/what-is-truth-betsy/

  • Children’s Books; Indigenous Literature; Read- Along ebooks

 

The First Day: A Story of Courage (2014)

Katherena Vermette

Makwa has to go to a new school … and he doesn’t want to go. How will he face his first day? The Seven Teaching of the Anishinaabe — love, wisdom, humility, courage, respect, honesty, and truth — are revealed in these seven stories for children. Set in an urban landscape with Indigenous children as the central characters, these stories about home and family will look familiar to all young readers.

Published by Portage and Main Press

* Winner of McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award; Selected for the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s Best Books for Kids & Teens; Approved resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

The First Day

  • Children’s Books; Indigenous Literature; Read- Along ebooks

 

Just The Right Gift: A Story of Love (2014)

Katherena Vermette

Migizi loves his Gookem. Can he find the perfect gift to show her how much? The Seven Teaching of the Anishinaabe — love, wisdom, humility, courage, respect, honesty, and truth — are revealed in these seven stories for children. Set in an urban landscape with Indigenous children as the central characters, these stories about home and family will look familiar to all young readers.

Published by Portage and Main Press

* Winner of McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award; Selected for the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s Best Books for Kids & Teens; Approved resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-just-right-gift/

  • Children’s Books; Indigenous Literature; Read- Along ebooks

 

Powwow Counting in Cree (2014)

Penny M. Thomas

Illustrated by Melinda Josie

This unique counting book introduces Cree numbers, from one to ten. Featuring powwow* imagery that reflects the rich culture and tradition of the Cree people, rhyme, rhythm, and glowing illustration combine to make language learning a joyful experience for young readers. A pronunciation guide is included in the back of the book.

Great ideas for using this book in your classroom can be found in the Teachers Guide for Counting for Powwow Counting in Cree.  A printable eBook of the guide is also available.

Published by Portage and Main Press

* Winner of McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award; Selected for the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s Best Books for Kids & Teens; Approved resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/powwow-counting-in-cree-2/

  • Children’s Books; Indigenous Literature; Read- Along ebooks

Singing Sisters:  A Story of Humility (2014)

Katherena Vermette

Ma’iingan knows she is a very good singer. Conflict erupts when her little sister wants to sing just like her. The Seven Teaching of the Anishinaabe — love, wisdom, humility, courage, respect, honesty, and truth — are revealed in these seven stories for children. Set in an urban landscape with Indigenous children as the central characters, these stories about home and family will look familiar to all young readers.

Published by Portage and Main Press

* Winner of McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award; Selected for the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s Best Books for Kids & Teens; Approved resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/singing-sisters/

  • Children’s Books; Indigenous Literature; Read- Along ebooks

 

Beaver and Porcupine (2011)

David Bouchard

Illustrated By Nidhi Chanani

Turtle Island Voices is a series of 30 levelled readers designed to foster awareness and understanding of Aboriginal cultures for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students in grades 1–3. Each grade in the series offers three traditional stories, four modern stories featuring Aboriginal protagonists, and three informational texts on a variety of engaging topics.

Published By Rubicon Publishing

http://www.rubiconpublishing.com/product/buffalo-learns-respect-2/

  • Aboriginal; Guided Reading, Independent Reading; Levelled Readers; Literacy; Shared Reading

 

Grandpas Girl (2011)

Nicola Campbell

A young girl delights in a visit to her grandpa’s farm. She and her cousins run through the fields, explore the root cellar where the salmon and jars of fruit are stored, swing on a rope out the barn loft window, visit the Appaloosa in the corral and tease the neighbor’s pig. The visit is also an opportunity for this child to ask Grandpa what her grandmother, Yayah, was like, and explore the “secret room,” with its old wooden trunk of ribbons, medals and photos of Grandpa in uniform. There is a wonderful blend of fun and family history in this visit to a grandparent, but also the realization that there can be some things about the people we know and love that will always remain a mystery.

* A finalist for the Christie Harris Illustrated Children’s Literature Prize

https://houseofanansi.com/products/grandpas-girls

  • Juvenile; Family; Multigenerational; Lifestyles; Farm Life; People & Places; Canada; Native Canadian

Our Reserve (2011)

Robert Cutting

Turtle Island Voices is a series of 30 levelled readers designed to foster awareness and understanding of Aboriginal cultures for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students in grades 1–3.  Each grade in the series offers three traditional stories, four modern stories featuring Aboriginal protagonists, and three informational texts on a variety of engaging topics.

Published By Rubicon Press

http://www.rubiconpublishing.com/product/our-reserve/

  • Aboriginal; Guided Reading; Independent Reading; Levelled Readers; Literacy; Shared Reading

That’s Awesome (2011)

Robert Cutting

Turtle Island Voices is a series of 30 levelled readers designed to foster awareness and understanding of Aboriginal cultures for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students in grades 1–3.  Each grade in the series offers three traditional stories, four modern stories featuring Aboriginal protagonists, and three informational texts on a variety of engaging topics.

Published By Rubicon Publishers

http://www.rubiconpublishing.com/product/thats-awesome/

  • Aboriginal; Guided Reading; Independent Reading; Levelled Readers; Literacy; Shared Reading

 

Nokum is My Teacher (2006)

David Bouchard

Illustrated By Allen Sapp

Nokum Is My Teacher is the poetic story of a young aboriginal boy, posing questions to his grandmother, his “Nokum”, about the wider world beyond the familiarity of their home and community. Through a series of questions, Nokum guides her grandson towards an understanding of his need to fit into and learn more about this large world beyond the reserve. Nokum offers her grandson a vision of a world he can enter through imagination and reading, while retaining respect for the ways of his people. By the conclusion of the book, the young grandson has learned many new ideas from his grandmother and discovered his own wisdom in dealing with the changes in his life.

Nokum Is My Teacher is a delightfully packaged book and audio CD, combining the written text in English and Cree with the mesmerizing voice of author/storyteller extraordinaire David Bouchard. It is illustrated by the hauntingly beautiful artworks of Allan Sapp, Cree elder, Governor General’s Award-winner, and Officer of the Order of Canada. The singing and drumming are done by Alberta’s Northern Cree, who have been nominated for a Grammy Award (2007) in the ‘Native American music album category.

Published by Red Deer Press

*Nominated for a Grammy Award

https://www.reddeerpress.com/Detail/0889953678

  • Character Education; Empathy; Prejudice & Tolerance; History & Social Studies; Canadian History; First Nations & Indigenous Peoples; Poetry.

 

The Red Sash (2005)

Jean E. Pendziwol

Illustrated by Nicolas Debon

The Red Sash is the story of a young Metis boy who lives near the fur trading post of Fort William, on Lake Superior, nearly 200 years ago. His father spends the long winter months as a guide, leading voyageurs into the northwest to trade with native people for furs. Now it is Rendezvous, when the voyageurs paddle back to Fort William with their packs of furs, and North West Company canoes come from Montreal bringing supplies for the next season. It is a time of feasting and dancing and of voyageurs trading stories around the campfire.

With preparations underway for a feast in the Great Hall, the boy canoes to a nearby island to hunt hare. But once there, a storm begins to brew. As the waves churn to foam, a canoe carrying a gentleman from the North West Company appears, heading toward the island for shelter. The boy helps land the canoe, which has been torn by rocks and waves. Then he saves the day as he paddles the gentleman across to Fort William in his own canoe, earning the gift of a voyageur’s red sash.

Published by House of Anansi

* Long-listed for the Michigan Reading Association’s “Great Lakes Great Books” 2007,

Selected for the CCBC Our Choice 2006

https://houseofanansi.com/products/the-red-sash

  • Historical; Canada; Pre-Confederation (to 1867); People & Places; Canada; Native Canadian

 

This Land Is My Land (2003)

George Littlechild

Through his own words and paintings, acclaimed Native artist George Littlechild takes us back in time to the first meeting between his Plains Cree ancestors and the first European settlers in North America. In This Land Is My Land, George intimately and honestly shares with readers how he discovered his Native heritage and what it means to him. He recounts the history of his people and expresses his wish to use his art to portray the wonders of his heritage, and to heal the pain of his people’s history.

Published by Children’s Book Press (first published October 1993)

*Winner of the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award for Picture Book (1994)

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/966426.This_Land_Is_My_Land           

  • Juvenile literature; Biography; Social life and customs; Indigenous Peoples; Plains Cree Peoples

 

Readings

Reconciliation and Residential Schools  

 

Dear Canada:  These Are My Words:  The Residential School Diary of Violet Pesheens (2016)

Ruby Slipperjack

Violet Pesheens is struggling to adjust to her new life at Residential School. She misses her Grandma; she has run-ins with Cree girls; at her “white” school, everyone just stares; and everything she brought has been taken from her, including her name—she is now just a number. But worst of all, she has a fear. A fear of forgetting the things she treasures most: her Anishnabe language; the names of those she knew before; and her traditional customs. A fear of forgetting who she was. Her notebook is the one place she can record all of her worries, and heartbreaks, and memories. And maybe, just maybe there will be hope at the end of the tunnel. Drawing from her own experiences at Residential School, Ruby Slipperjack creates a brave, yet heartbreaking heroine in Violet, and lets young readers glimpse into an all-too important chapter in our nation’s history.

Published By Scholastic Inc.

* Shortlisted, RedCedar Award (BC Young Readers’ Choice 2018; Commended, Best Books for Kids and teens, Canadian Children’s Book Centre, Starred Selection, 2017; Commended, TD Summer Reading Club, 2017; Commended, CBC Best Books of the year, 2016

http://www.scholastic.ca/books/view/dear-canada-these-are-my-words

  • Education; Multicultural; Education; Reference; Social Science; Residential school; Biography

 

I Am Not A Number (2016)

Jenny Kay Dupuis & Kathy Kacer

Illustrated by Gillian Newland

When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from, despite the efforts of the nuns who are in charge at the school and who tell her that she is not to use her own name but instead use the number they have assigned to her. When she goes home for summer holidays, Irene’s parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But where will they hide? And what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Based on the life of co-author Jenny Kay Dupuis’ grandmother, I Am Not a Number is a hugely necessary book that brings a terrible part of Canada’s history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to.

Published by Second Story Press

https://secondstorypress.ca/kids/i-am-not-a-number 

  • Character Education; Empathy; Prejudice & Tolerance; History & Social Studies, Canadian History; First Nations & Indigenous Peoples

 

Kookums Red Shoes (2015)  

Peter Eyvindson

Illustrated by: Sheldon Dawson

The legacy of the residential schools is conveyed with respect and imagination in this illustrated story for young readers. As the elderly Kookum remembers the experiences in her youth that changed her life forever, we see what was lost in her life, and how goodness persisted.

Published in Canada by Pemmican Publishers

http://www.mcnallyrobinson.com/9781894717540/peter-eyvindson/kookums-red-shoes

–      Character Education; Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance; History & Social Studies, Canadian History; First Nations & Indigenous Peoples; Government & Citizenship; Reflecting Diversity

Little Butterfly Girl:  An Indian Residential School Story (2015)

Mallozzi Restoule

Illustrated by Donald Chrétien

A story of how a little girl loses her spirit and identity during her time at Residential School.

Published by The Anishinabek Nation

https://issuu.com/anishinabeknews/docs/lbg_book_english

  • Education; History; Literacy; Residential Schools

 

Missing Nimama (2015)

Melanie Florance

Illustrated by Francois Thisdale

A young mother, one of the many missing indigenous women, watches over her small daughter as she grows up without her nimama. Together, but separated, they experience important milestones: the first day of school, first dance, first date, a wedding, and new life. A free-verse story of love, loss, and acceptance told in alternating voices, Missing Nimama, shows the human side of a national tragedy. An afterword by the author provides a simple, age-appropriate context for young readers. Includes a glossary of Cree terms. Typeset in a dyslexia-friendly font.

Download a free Literature Circle guide for your class and an accompanying rubric.

Published By Clockwise Press

*Long-listed for the Michigan Reading Association’s “Great Lakes Great Books” 2007, Selected for the CCBC Our Choice 2006

https://houseofanansi.com/products/the-red-sash

  • Historical; Canada; Pre-Confederation (to 1867); People & Places; Canada; Native Canadian, Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, MMIWG2S

 

A Stranger at Home: A True Story (2011)

Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton
illustrated by Liz Amini- Holmes

Traveling to be reunited with her family in the arctic, 10-year-old Margaret Pokiak can hardly contain her excitement. It’s been two years since her parents delivered her to the school run by the dark-cloaked nuns and brothers. Coming ashore, Margaret spots her family, but her mother barely recognizes her, screaming, “Not my girl.” Margaret realizes she is now marked as an outsider. And Margaret is an outsider: she has forgotten the language and stories of her people, and she can’t even stomach the food her mother prepares.

However, Margaret gradually relearns her language and her family’s way of living. Along the way, she discovers how important it is to remain true to the ways of her people—and to herself. Highlighted by archival photos and striking artwork, this first-person account of a young girl’s struggle to find her place will inspire young readers to ask what it means to belong.

Published by Annick Press

* USBBY Outstanding International Books Honor List Best Bets List, Ontario Library Association White Ravens Collection, International Youth Library, Munich Independent Publishers Book Award Skipping Stones Honor Book Best Books for Kids & Teens, Canadian Children’s Book Centre Nonfiction Honor List, VOYA Book of the Year Award finalist, Foreword Reviews Next Generation Indie Book Award finalist First Nation Communities Reads Selection finalist Golden Oak Award nomination

http://www.annickpress.com/Stranger-at-Home-A

  • Biography; Inuit; Native peoples; Artic; Residential Schools; Identity; Community; Canadian Content; Family; Society; History; Memoir

 

Fatty Legs: A True Story (2010)

Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton

Illustrated by Liz Amini-Holmes

Eight-year-old Margaret Pokiak has set her sights on learning to read, even though it means leaving her village in the high Arctic. Faced with unceasing pressure, her father finally agrees to let her make the five-day journey to attend school, but he warns Margaret of the terrors of residential schools. At school Margaret soon encounters the Raven, a black-cloaked nun with a hooked nose and bony fingers that resemble claws. She immediately dislikes the strong-willed young Margaret. Intending to humiliate her, the heartless Raven gives gray stockings to all the girls — all except Margaret, who gets red ones. In an instant Margaret is the laughingstock of the entire school. In the face of such cruelty, Margaret refuses to be intimidated and bravely gets rid of the stockings. Although a sympathetic nun stands up for Margaret, in the end it is this brave young girl who gives the Raven a lesson in the power of human dignity. Complemented by archival photos from Margaret Pokiak-Fenton’s collection and striking artworks from Liz Amini-Holmes, this inspiring first-person account of a plucky girl’s determination to confront her tormentor will linger with young readers.

Published in Canada by Annick Press.

*Ten Best Children’s Books of the Year, The Globe and Mail USBBY Outstanding International Books Honor List PubWest Book Design Awards, Bronze Nautilus Award, Silver Skipping Stones Honor Book Information Book Award, Honor Book Best Books for Kids & Teens, starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre First Nation Communities Read Selection Sheila A. Egoff Children’s Literature Prize finalist Book of the Year Award finalist, ForeWord Reviews Cybils, Blogger Literary Award nomination Saskatchewan Young Readers’ Choice Award nomination Hackmatack Award nomination Children’s Literature Roundtables of Canada Information Book Award nomination Golden Oak Award nomination, Ontario Library Association Rocky Mountain Book Award nomination Young Readers Choice Award nomination, Pacific Northwest Library Association

http://www.annickpress.com/Fatty-Legs

  • Biography, Inuit; Native peoples; Aboriginal; Indigenous; arctic; school; self-esteem; abuse; community; prejudice; Canadian content; courage/ bravery; right vs. wrong; role reversal; secrets; society; history; bullying; memoir; character education

 

Island Kids:  Courageous Kids (2010)

Tara Saracuse

This is a history of British Columbia’s island children, told in their voices, from their perspectives. Composed of twenty-two stories, Island Kids is a snapshot of a period and place in time. The topics range from quintessentially coastal experiences, like a day at the beach, to stories that deal with serious issues, such as BC’s history of residential schools, but they all remain true to the experience of the children telling the story. At the end of each chapter is a section called “What do we know for sure?” that gives the reader greater depth and context. The stories are written in a dynamic and authentic voice and are aimed at readers aged eight to twelve.

Unlike history that has either been fictionalized or told from an adult’s perspective, the Courageous Kids series brings history to kids in their own words.

Published by Brindle & Glass

http://www.brindleandglass.com/book_details.php?isbn_upc=9781897142431

  • Character Education, Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance, History & Social Studies, Canadian History, First Nations & Indigenous Peoples, Government & Citizenship, Reflecting Diversity

 

Pulling for Stz’Uminus:  The Pearl Harris Story (2010)

Pearl Harris and Donna Klockars

A young Pearl Harris spends long summer days playing on beaches watching her sister train for canoe racing.  Pearl happily dreams of the day when she will join the pullers of the famous St. Andrews Canoe Club.  Everything changes when, without warning, her older sisters were stolen from their home and sent to Port Alberni Residential School. Pearl is left with loneliness and loss.  She watches and learns all she can about canoe racing and joins the club at a very young age.  The important lessons she learns as an athlete make a difference in her life.

Published By Stz’uminus Education

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/574f05e91bbee0a412270a38/t/5792b5bdd482e9c7938416a9/1469232582329/Pearl+Harris_proof_AUG31.pdf

  • Indigenous; Residential Schools; Siblings; Family; Relationships; Stz’Uminus; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples

Goodbye Buffalo Bay (2009)

Larry Loyie and Constance Brissenden

Lawrence just has to make it through his final year of residential school and then he will never have to set foot in this horrible place again. But despite his best efforts to stay out of trouble, he finds himself in a few frightening predicaments. An escape attempt fails and a stolen gun misfires. Fortunately, his friendships and the tutelage of Sister Theresa help make his last school days bearable.

When he returns home, Lawrence is not yet a man but no longer a boy. He struggles to find acceptance in a community that seems to have forgotten him. He tries a few different jobs and makes a name for himself as a hard worker. With increased confidence and the money he has saved up, he leaves Slave Lake to fulfill his dream of living in the mountains.

Published By Theytus Books

*Bestseller March 2016

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/Goodbye-Buffalo-Bay

–      Juvenile Fiction; Historical; Canada; PostConfederation; People & Places; Canada; Native Canadian Social Situations; New Experience; Family

 

As Long as the Rivers Flow (2005)

Larry Loyie and Constance Brissenden

Illustrated by Heather Holmlund               

Starting in the 1800s and continuing into the 20th century, First Nations children were forcibly taken to government-sponsored residential schools to erase their traditional languages and cultures. This moving book tells of one such child, author Larry Loyie, and his last summer with his Cree tribe. It is a time of learning and adventure. He cares for an abandoned baby owl, watches his grandmother make winter moccasins, and sees her kill a huge grizzly with one shot. The sensitive text and Heather Holmlund’s expressive illustrations beautifully capture the joy and drama of a First Nations family’s last summer together.

Published in Canada by Groundwood Books       

*Winner of the Norma Fleck Non-fiction Award 2003; Selected for the Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choice 2004       

https://houseofanansi.com/products/as-long-as-the-rivers-flow

  • Juvenile Fiction; Historical; Canada; PostConfederation; People & Places; Canada; Native Canadian Social Situations; New Experience; Family

 

No Time To Say Goodbye (2002)

Sylvis Olsen, Rite Morris, Ann Sam

No Time to Say Goodbye is a fictional account of five children sent to aboriginal boarding school, based on the recollections of a number of Tsartlip First Nations people. These unforgettable children are taken by government agents from Tsartlip Day School to live at Kuper Island Residential School. The five are isolated on the small island and life becomes regimented by the strict school routine. They experience the pain of homesickness and confusion while trying to adjust to a world completely different from their own. Their lives are no longer organized by fishing, hunting and family, but by bells, line-ups and chores. In spite of the harsh realities of the residential school, the children find adventure in escape, challenge in competition, and camaraderie with their fellow students.

Sometimes sad, sometimes funny, always engrossing, No Time to Say Goodbye is a story that readers of all ages won’t soon forget.

Published in Canada by Sononis Press

*Adopted by the BC Teachers’ Federation, Saskatchewan Young Readers’ Choice Snow, Willow Award Nominee

http://www.sononis.com/our-books?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=103&category_id=2

  • Historical; Canada; PostConfederation (1867-); People & Places; Native Canadian; Social Situations; New Experience

 

My Name Is Seepeetza (1992)

Shirley Sterling

At six years old, Seepeetza is taken from her happy family life on Joyaska Ranch to live as a boarder at the Kamloops Indian Residential School. Life at the school is not easy, but Seepeetza still manages to find some bright spots. Always, thoughts of home make her school life bearable. An honest, inside look at life in an Indian residential school in the 1950s, and how one indomitable young spirit survived it.

Published in Canada by House of Anansi

https://houseofanansi.com/products/my-name-is-seepeetza

  • People & Places; Canada; Native Canadian; Historical; Post- Confederation (1867-); Social Situations; Prejudice & Racism

 

Sammy Goes to Residential School (1991)

Mary Lingman

Illustrated by Susan Ross

Sammy is a seven-year-old Cree boy who has to go to residential school away from his family and the reserve because his parents spend the year on the trap line until spring. Sammy is unhappy about leaving his family, and the preparations are an ordeal—having his grandmother cut his hair short with a big scissors, and being scrubbed all over by his mother. But worse things happened when he got to school. He had to get undressed in front of the supervisor and the other boys to have a shower and he was given a number, 122. As if that were not bad enough, he was not allowed to speak Cree, which made him worried. He didn’t know much English, but the other boys promised to help him, and he felt better. Sammy gets used to the routines of school that at first were so foreign to him and he enjoys learning many new things. In the spring when school is over, he learns that the residential school will be closed and next year there will be a school in his village. He will be able to live with his grandmother and his aunt while his parents are on the trapline the next year, and he can still go to school.

Published by Penumbra Press

https://www.penumbrapress.com/kids/sammygoes_nativeexperience7.php

  • Character Education; Empathy; Prejudice & Tolerance; History & Social Studies; Canadian History; First Nations & Indigenous Peoples; Government & Citizenship; Residential Schools.

Indigenous History, Culture & Contemporary Topics

The Chief: Mistahimaskwa:  Tales from Big Spirit Series (2016)

David A. Robertson

Illustrated by Scott B. Henderson

The Chief: Mistahimaskwa (Big Bear) is one book in the Tales from Big Spirit series by David Alexander Robertson from Highwater Press. Tales from Big Spirit is a unique seven-book graphic novel series that delves into the stories of seven great Indigenous heroes from Canadian history—some already well known and others who deserve to be. Designed to correspond to grades 4–6 social studies curriculums across Canada, these full colour graphic novels could be used in literature circles, novel studies, and book clubs to facilitate discussion of social studies topics.

Published By Portage and main Press

* Selected by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Inclusion in Best Books for Kids & Teens

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-chief-mistahimaskwa/

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature; Tales From Big Spirit

 

The Mask That Sang (2016)

Susan Currie

A young girl discovers her Cayuga heritage when she finds a mask that sings to her.

Cass and her mom have always stood on their own against the world. Then Cass learns she had a grandmother, one who was never part of her life, one who has just died and left her and her mother the first house they could call their own. But with it comes more questions than answers: Why is her Mom so determined not to live there? Why was this relative kept so secret? And what is the unusual mask, hidden in a drawer, trying to tell her? Strange dreams, strange voices, and strange incidents all lead Cass closer to solving the mystery and making connections she never dreamed she had.

Published By Second Story Press

https://secondstorypress.ca/kids/the-mask-that-sang

  • Character Education; Bullying; Family and Friendship; Prejudice &Tolerance; reflecting Diversity; First Nations & Indigenous Peoples

 

Honouring The Buffalo (2015)

Raymond Lavallee, Judith Silverthorne & Mike Keepness

Written in both English and Cree (y dialect), this is the legend about the buffalo and why they were so important to the Plain Cress people for their survival. The story woven around it is about a boy and his grandfather and their visit to see real buffalo.

Published By Your Nickel’s Worth Publishing

https://www.saskmade.ca/collections/your-nickel-s-worth-publishing/products/honouring-the-buffalo?variant=2138821124

  • Character Education, Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance, History & Social Studies, Canadian History, First Nations & Indigenous Peoples, Government & Citizenship, Reflecting Diversity

 

The Ballad of Nancy April: Shawnadithit (2014)

David Alexander Robertson

When a mishap delays Jessie at the end of a school day, she takes a shortcut home. But the shortcut turns into an adventure, as Jessie is transported through time and space, to early 19th-century Newfoundland. There she meets Shawnadithit who, as the last surviving member of the Beothuk, has witnessed the end of a once-great people.

Tales from Big Spirit is a unique graphic novel series that delves into the stories of great Indigenous heroes from Canadian history — some already well known and others who deserve to be.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Selected by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Inclusion in Best Books for Kids & Teens; Recommended Text Grade 4 Module 1A NYS Common Core ELA; Approved Resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

http://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-ballad-of-nancy-april-shawnadithit/

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature; Tales From the Big Spirit

 

The Land of OS: John Ramsay: Tales of The Big Spirit Series (2014)

David A. Robertson

Illustrated by Wai Tien

When Richard’s class from Big Spirit School takes a canoe trip, he and his classmates chance upon an elderly woman. She tells them the story of her grandfather, John Ramsay, of the Sandy Bar community on Lake Winnipeg. Ramsay’s land was taken by the government and given to the new settlers from Iceland who arrived there in 1875. Yet many owed their survival to Ramsay, who helped them through freezing winters, hunger, and a devastating smallpox epidemic.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Selected by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Inclusion in Best Books for Kids & Teens; Recommended Text Grade 4 Module 1A NYS Common Core ELA; Approved Resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-land-of-os-john-ramsay/

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature; Tales From the Big Spirit

The Peacemaker: Thanadelthur:  Tales From Big Spirit Series (2014)

David A Robertson

Illustrated by Wai Tien

When Cole’s teacher catches him drawing rather than listening in class, he gives Cole a special assignment: an oral presentation on an important Aboriginal figure. Cole will do almost anything to avoid speaking in public — even feigning illness. But when he hear the story of the remarkable woman known as Thanadelthur — peacemaker between the Cree and the Dene and interpreter for the governor of Fort York — he is so inspired by her bravery, he overcomes his own fears. Tales from Big Spirit is a unique six-book graphic novel series that delves into the stories of six great Indigenous heroes from Canadian history — some already well known and others who deserve to be.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Selected by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Inclusion in Best Books for Kids & Teens; Recommended Text Grade 4 Module 1A NYS Common Core ELA; Approved Resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-peacemaker-thanadelthur/

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature; Tales From the Big Spirit

The Poet: Pauline Johnson (2014)

David A Robertson

Illustrated by Scott Henderson

The Poet is the story of Pauline Johnson, born on the Six Nations Reserve, who wrote and performed her work throughout North America, and was a pioneer of Canadian literature.

The Poet is one book in the Tales from Big Spirit series. Tales from Big Spirit is a unique six-book graphic novel series that delves into the stories of some of the great Indigenous heroes from Canadian history—some already well known and others who deserve to be. Designed to correspond to grades 4–6 social studies curriculums across Canada, these full colour graphic novels could be used in literature circles, novel studies, and book clubs to facilitate discussion of social studies topics. These books will help students make historical connections while promoting important literacy skills.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Selected by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Inclusion in Best Books for Kids & Teens; Recommended Text Grade 4 Module 1A NYS Common Core ELA; Approved Resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-poet-pauline-johnson/

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature; Tales From the Big Spirit

The Rebel: Gabriel Dumont (2014)

David A Robertson

Illustrated by Andrew Lodwick

The Rebel is the story of Gabriel Dumont, his role in the 1885 Northwest Rebellion, and the Metis of Batoche.

The Rebel is one book in the Tales from Big Spirit series. Tales from Big Spirit is a unique six-book graphic novel series that delves into the stories of some of the great Indigenous heroes from Canadian history—some already well known and others who deserve to be. Designed to correspond to grades 4–6 social studies curriculums across Canada, these full colour graphic novels could be used in literature circles, novel studies, and book clubs to facilitate discussion of social studies topics. These books will help students make historical connections while promoting important literacy skills.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Selected by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Inclusion in Best Books for Kids & Teens; Recommended Text Grade 4 Module 1A NYS Common Core ELA; Approved Resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-rebel-gabriel-dumont/

  • Novels; Indigenous Literature; Tales From the Big Spirit

 

Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow (2013)

Willam Dumas

Illustrated by Leonard Paul

In 1993, the remains of a young woman were discovered at Nagami Bay, South Indian Lake, Manitoba. Out of that important archeological discovery came this unique story about a week in the life of Pisim, a young Cree woman, who lived in the Mid 1600s. In the story, created by renowned storyteller William Dumas, Pisim begins to recognize her miskanow – her life’s journey – and to develop her gifts for fulfilling that path. The story is brought to life by the rich imagery of Leonard Paul, and is accompanied by sidebars on Cree language and culture, archaeology and history, maps, songs, and more.

Published By Portage and Main Press

*Winner of the Canadian Archaeological Association (CAA) 2014 Public Communications Author; Shortlisted for the Lillian Shepherd Memorial Award for Excellence in Illustration, 2014; Approved for Manitoba Classrooms

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/pisim-finds-her-miskanow/

  • Education; Archaeology; Reference; Indigenous Literature; Children’s Books

 

The Scout: Tommy Prince (2013)

David A Robertson

Illustrated by Scott B Henderson

The Scout, is the story of Tommy Prince, a decorated Aboriginal war hero, and his exploits on the European battlefields of the Second World War.

The Scout is one book in the Tales from Big Spirit series. Tales from Big Spirit is a unique six-book graphic novel series that delves into the stories of some of the great Indigenous heroes from Canadian history—some already well known and others who deserve to be. Designed to correspond to grades 4–6 social studies curriculums across Canada, these full colour graphic novels could be used in literature circles, novel studies, and book clubs to facilitate discussion of social studies topics. These books will help students make historical connections while promoting important literacy skills.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Selected by the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Inclusion in Best Books for Kids & Teens; Recommended Text Grade 4 Module 1A NYS Common Core ELA; Approved Resource for Manitoba Classrooms.

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-scout-tommy-prince/

  • Novels; Indigenous Literature; Tales From the Big Spirit

 

Spirit of the White Bison (2013)

Beatrice Culleton Mosionier & David Alexander Robertson

The Great Plains of North America was once home to great herds of bison. The Aboriginal people who lived there revered them and relied on them for food, clothing, and shelter. Into one of these great herds, Little White Buffalo was born in the 19th century. In this heartfelt story, she retells her life – a life that coincides with the devastation of the bison, destroyed by hunters and the coming of the railway.

Published By Portage and Main Press

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/april-raintree/

  • Aboriginal books; National Aboriginal History; History; Residential Schools; Foster Care; Métis; 60’s Scoop

 

The Secret of Your Name (2009)  

David Bouchard

Illustrated By Dennis Weber

Canada’s three most well known and respected Métis artists collaborate in this heart wrenching telling of what it means to be Métis. Bouchard’s heartfelt story is illustrated by Canada’s most prominent Métis artist Dennis Weber. Included on the accompanying CD, with reading in English/French and Michif, is the Red River Jig performed by acclaimed Master Métis Fiddler John Arcand.

Canada’s Métis are the only mixed blood people in the world recognized by every level of government as being a Nation. The Métis have their own language, flag, songs and stories. They have exciting traditions and a proud history. Sadly, their journey was one of hardships, denial and often lies. In The Secret of Your Name, these three men open their hearts to all those who care to know what it means when it is said that we are Proud to be Métis!

This spectacular book will appeal to any and all who have an interest in Canada’s aboriginal people. It will call out to art collectors, musicians and all who have ever pondered their own past.

Published By Red Deer Press

https://www.reddeerpress.com/Detail/0889954399

  • Empathy; Prejudice & Tolerance; History & Social Studies; Canadian History; Métis & Indigenous Peoples; Poetry.

 

Dear Canada:  Where the River takes Me: The Hudson’s Bay Diary of Jenna Sinclair, Fort Victoria (2008)

Julie Lawson

Motherless for years, and now orphaned when a hunting accident takes her father’s life, Jenna Sinclair is in the care of her prim Aunt Grace, who always finds fault with Jenna’s high spirits and tendency to break rules. Jenna finds kindred spirits in her Grandmother, one of the Home Guard Cree who lives near Fort Edmonton, and with her friend Suzanne. But even then, Jenna is still eager to have more freedom, and daydreams of finding Adventure with a capital A.

Opportunity knocks after Jenna moves southwest with her newly-married aunt to Fort Colvile, and begs her aunt to let her attend a “”real”” school at Fort Victoria on Vancouver’s Island. With a small brigade, she begins a sometimes harrowing journey down rivers and over mountains to her new life. But the teachers at the new school are even more strict than her aunt, and she can’t find a friend as likeable as Suzanne. Ever restless, Jenna wants the kind of excitement worthy of being included in a Novel. By sneaking outside the fort walls, spying on the Company officers, even visiting the forbidden Songhees village, she sometimes finds more than she bargained for.

As Jenna faithfully records her observations of the world around her — bringing the reader “”inside the walls”” of three very different HBC posts — she makes surprising discoveries about herself, and about Heroes, Villains and the places where Adventure can truly be found.”

Published by Scholastic Ltd. Canada

*Short Listed Bolen Books Children’s Book Prize; Commended, resource Links, Best of The year 2008

http://scholastic.ca/books/view/dear-canada-where-the-river-takes-me

  • All about Canada; Favorite Series: Fiction; History

 

Environmentalists From Our First Nations (2008)

Vincent Schilling

The men and women profiled here are united by their work to protect the environment and to support indigenous rights. Their stories take us from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to the Black Mesa in Arizona.

Published By Second Story Press

https://secondstorypress.ca/kids/environmentalists-from-our-first-nations

  • Environment; Environmentalists; First Nations; Climate Change; Reader; Role Models

 

Great Athletes From Our First Nations (2008)

Vincent Schilling

Great Athletes from our First Nations profiles thirteen outstanding athletes in such diverse sports as figure skating, race car driving, skiing and bowling.

Here, for young readers, are stories of how courageous and talented athletes like Shelly Hruska and Jordin Tootoo used dedication, discipline and perseverance to achieve their goals.

Published By Second Story Press

https://secondstorypress.ca/kids/great-athletes-from-our-first-nations

  • Sports; First Nations; Athletes; Reader; Role Models

Great Musicians From Our First Nations (2008)

Vincent Schilling

Music is their passion. Follow the journeys of ten talented musicians from the Native community as they make their way to the top. All of them, whether their music is traditional drumming or mainstream rock, bring their own cultural traditions to their music.

Rising stars Shane Yellowbird and Crystal Shawanda are steeped in country music. The Blackfire band combines punk rock with Dine’ music, while Four Rivers Drum has been drumming at powwows for more than fourteen years. Leela Gilday is an award-winning folk artist and Michael Bucher’s music protects sacred sites. Contrast classical guitarist Gabriel Ayala with rock guitarist Mato Nanji and learn about the talents of jazz vocalist Jamie Coon and Native American flutist Mary Youngblood.

Published By Second Story Press

https://secondstorypress.ca/kids/environmentalists-from-our-first-nations

  • Music; Musicians; First Nations; Reader; Role Models

Men of Courage From Our First Nations (2008)

Vincent Schilling

The stories of these men are tales of courage, determination and honesty, often in the face of racism and adversity. Read about Larry Merculieff, who helped bring a once oppressed Aleutian people to a position of power and self-sufficiency; Frank Abraham, an Ojibwe Chief whose wisdom and honesty helped his tribe to rise from near financial failure; Raymond Cross, a Coyote leader who won a victory of compensation for the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara people; and Stanley Vollant, an Aboriginal surgeon who fulfilled a 100-year-old Innu tribal prophecy.

This is an inspiring collection of biographies for young readers about men who have enriched the lives of many in their roles as doctors, chiefs, firemen, teachers, and community leaders.

Published By Second Story Press

https://secondstorypress.ca/kids/men-of-courage-from-our-first-nations

  • Heroes; First Nations; Reader; Role

We Feel Good Out Here/ Zhik gwaa’an nakhwatthaįįtat gwiinzìi (The Land Is Our StoryBook) (2008)

Julie-Ann André, Mindy Willett,

Photography by Tessa MacIntosh

Julie-Ann AndrA(c) is a “Gwichya Gwich’in “from Tsiigehtchic in the Northwest Territories. She is a Canadian Ranger, a mother of twin daughters, a hunter, a trapper, and a student. In “We Feel Good Out Here,” Julie-Ann shares her family’s story and the story of her land-“Khaii luk,” the place of winter fish. As Julie-Ann says, “The land has a story to tell, if you know how to listen. When I travel, the land tells me where my ancestors have been. It tells me where the animals have come and gone, and it tells me what the weather may be like tomorrow.” Her home is an important part of who Julie-Ann is. She wants to help make sure that her environment is healthy, so it can continue to tell its story to her children and their children.

Published By Fifth House

* Canadian Children’s Book Centre Our Choice, 2009

https://www.fifthhousepublishers.ca/Detail/1897252331

  • Biography; Children- Non- Fiction; Environment; Traditional Knowledge; Business; Social Studies Grade 4

 

The Broken Flute:  The Native Experience in Books for Children (2006)

Doris Seale, Beverly Slapin, eds

A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children is a companion to its predecessor published by Oyate, Through Indian Eyes: The Native Experience in Books for Children. A compilation of work by Native parents, children, educators, poets and writers, A Broken Flute contains, from a Native perspective, ‘living stories,’ essays, poetry, and hundreds of reviews of ‘children’s books about Indians.’ It’s an indispensable volume for anyone interested in presenting honest materials by and about indigenous peoples to children.

Published by Rowman & Littlefield

https://rowman.com/ISBN/9780759107793/A-Broken-Flute-The-Native-Experience-in-Books-for-Children

  • Education; Multicultural; Education; Reference; Social Science; Native American Studies

 

Code talker: A Novel About the Navajo Marines of World War two (2006)

Joseph Bruchac

Throughout World War II, in the conflict fought against Japan, Navajo code talkers were a crucial part of the U.S. effort, sending messages back and forth in an unbreakable code that used their native language. They braved some of the heaviest fighting of the war, and with their code, they saved countless American lives. Yet their story remained classified for more than twenty years.
But now Joseph Bruchac brings their stories to life for young adults through the riveting fictional tale of Ned Begay, a sixteen-year-old Navajo boy who becomes a code talker. His grueling journey is eye-opening and inspiring. This deeply affecting novel honors all of those young men, like Ned, who dared to serve, and it honors the culture and language of the Navajo Indians.

Published By Penguin Random House

* ALA Best Book for Young Adults

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/288494/code-talker-by-joseph-bruchac/9780142405963/

  • Education; Multicultural; Education; Reference; World War Two; Code Talkers; Biography

Readings

Reconciliation and Residential Schools

 

Speaking our Truth (2017)

Monique Gray Smith

Canada’s relationship with its Indigenous people has suffered as a result of both the Residential School system and the lack of understanding of the historical and current impact of those schools. Healing and repairing that relationship requires education, awareness and increased understanding of the legacy and the impacts still being felt by Survivors and their families. Guided by acclaimed Indigenous author Monique Gray Smith, readers will learn about the lives of Survivors and listen to allies who are putting the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission into action.

Published by Orca Book Publishers Canada

https://www.orcabook.com/Speaking-Our-Truth-P1336.aspx

  • Reconciliation; Resilience; Respect; Indigenous; First Nations; Native Americans; Allies

 

Fire Starters (2016)

Jen Storm

Looking for a little mischief after discovering an old flare gun, Ron and Ben find themselves in trouble when the local gas bar on Agamiing Reserve goes up in flames, and they are wrongly accused of arson by the sheriff’s son. As the investigation goes forward, community attitudes are revealed, and the truth slowly comes to light. 

Published in Canada by HighWater Press

*Selected by The Canadian Children’s Book Centre for Best Books for Kids & Teens (2017).

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/fire-starters/

  • Graphic Novels; Dabwe Series; Youth Fiction; Indigenous

 

In This Together:  Fifteen Stories of Truth and Reconciliation (2016)

Danielle Metcalfe- Chenail eds.

What is real reconciliation? This collection of essays from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous contributors from across Canada welcomes readers into a timely, healing conversation—one we’ve longed for but, before now, have had a hard time approaching.

These reflective and personal pieces come from journalists, writers, academics, visual artists, filmmakers, city planners, and lawyers, all of whom share their personal light-bulb moments regarding when and how they grappled with the harsh reality of colonization in Canada, and its harmful legacy. Without flinching, they look deeply and honestly at their own experiences and assumptions about race and racial divides in Canada in hopes that the rest of the country will do the same.

Featuring a candid conversation between CBC radio host Shelagh Rogers and Chief Justice Sinclair, this book acts as a call for all Canadians to make reconciliation and decolonization a priority, and reminds us that once we know the history, we all have the responsibility—and ability—to make things better.

 Published by Brindle and Glass

http://www.brindleandglass.com/book_details.php?isbn_upc=9781927366448

  • Reconciliation; TRC; Literature; Stories; Poetry; Residential School; Activism; Colonialism; Racism; Canada; Canadians

 

Secret Path (2016)

Gord Downie

Illustrated by Jeff Lemire

Secret Path is a ten song digital download album by Gord Downie with a graphic novel by illustrator Jeff Lemire that tells the story of Chanie “Charlie” Wenjack, a twelve-year-old boy who died in flight from the Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School fifty years ago.

Chanie, misnamed Charlie by his teachers, was a young boy who died on October 22, 1966, walking the railroad tracks, trying to escape from the Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School to return home. Chanie’s home was 400 miles away. He didn’t know that. He didn’t know where it was, nor how to find it, but, like so many kids—more than anyone will be able to imagine—he tried.

Chanie’s story is Canada’s story. We are not the country we thought we were. History will be re-written. We are all accountable. Secret Path acknowledges a dark part of Canada’s history—the long-suppressed mistreatment of Indigenous children and families by the residential school system—with the hope of starting our country on a road to reconciliation. Every year as we remember Chanie Wenjack, the hope for Secret Path is that it educates all Canadians young and old on this omitted part of our history, urging our entire nation to play an active role in the preservation of Indigenous lives and culture in Canada.

The next hundred years are going to be painful as we come to know Chanie Wenjack and thousands like him—as we find out about ourselves, about all of us—but only when we do can we truly call ourselves, “Canada.”

Proceeds from Secret Path will be donated to The Gord Downie Secret Path Fund for Truth and Reconciliation via The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) at The University of Manitoba.

Published By Simon & Schuster Canada

http://www.simonandschuster.ca/books/Secret-Path/Gord-Downie/9781501155949

  • First Nations; Residential Schools; TRC; Reconciliation; Relationships, Indigenous World Views; Culture and Identity: State Violence; Land; Law and Treaties

 

Sorry:  Why Our Church Apologized (2016)

Maggie McLeod, Stan McKay, Bill Phipps & Carolyn Pogue

This basic, simply-written and profound booklet has been co-authored by four people. Two are First Nations; two euro-Canadians and all are members of the United Church of Canada. They write to help people understand some very important things about human nature and inter-personal relations.

The booklet sells for a modest price and could serve well as a small-group study
document. But it is also available free-of- charge for anyone who can read these
words on a computer.

 Published by Wood Lake Books

https://www.woodlakebooks.com/sorry/index.html

  • Reconciliation; Residential School; United Church; TRC; Church; Apologies

 

Wenjack (2016)

Joseph Boyden

An Ojibwe boy runs away from a North Ontario Indian School, not realizing just how far away home is. Along the way he’s followed by Manitous, spirits of the forest who comment on his plight, cajoling, taunting, and ultimately offering him a type of comfort on his difficult journey back to the place he was so brutally removed from.

Written by Scotiabank Giller Prize–winning author Joseph Boyden and beautifully illustrated by acclaimed artist Ken Monkman, Wenjack is a powerful and poignant look into the world of a residential school runaway trying to find his way home.

Published By Penguin Random House Canada

* Shortlisted for the 2017 OLSN Northern Lit Award

https://penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/549816/wenjack#9780735233386

  • Fiction; Residential School Ontario; Manitous; Community; Family

 

Out of the Depths, 4th Edition:  Experiences of Mi’kmaw Children at the Indian Residential School at Shubenacadie Nova Scotia (2015)

Isabelle Knockwood

In the 1880s, through an amendment to the Indian Act of 1876, the government of Canada began to require all Aboriginal children to attend schools administered by churches. Separating these children from their families, removing them from their communities and destroying Aboriginal culture by denying them the right to speak Indigenous languages and perform native spiritual ceremonies, these residential schools were explicitly developed to assimilate Aboriginal peoples into Canadian culture and erase their existence as a people.

Daring to break the code of silence imposed on Aboriginal students, residential school survivor Isabelle Knockwood offers the firsthand experiences of forty-two survivors of the Shubenacadie Indian Residential School. In their own words, these former students remember their first day of residential schooling, when they were outwardly transformed through hair cuts and striped uniforms marked with numbers. Then followed years of inner transformation from a strict and regimented life of education and manual training, as well as harsh punishments for speaking their own language or engaging in Indigenous customs. The survivors also speak of being released from their school — and having to decide between living in a racist and unwelcoming dominant society or returning to reserves where the Aboriginal culture had evolved.

In this newly updated fourth edition, Knockwood speaks to twenty-one survivors of the Shubenacadie Indian Residential School about their reaction to the apology by the Canadian government in 2008. Is it now possible to move forward?

Published by Fernwood Publishing

https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/out-of-the-depths-fourth-edition

  • History; Memoirs; Intergenerational Impacts; Residential School; Reconciliation; Identity; Mi’kmaw; Shubenacadie Indian Residential School

 

Righting Canada’s Wrongs (2015)

Melanie Florence

Canada’s residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history. In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed by the Legislature of the Province of Canada with the aim of assimilating First Nations people. In 1879, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned the “Report on Industrial Schools for Indians and Half-Breeds.” This report led to native residential schools across Canada. First Nations and Inuit children aged seven to fifteen years old were taken from their families, sometimes by force, and sent to residential schools where they were made to abandon their culture. They were dressed in uniforms, their hair was cut, they were forbidden to speak their native language, and they were often subjected to physical and psychological abuse.  The schools were run by the churches and funded by the federal government. About 150,000 aboriginal children went to 130 residential schools across Canada. The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996 in Saskatchewan. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court. Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has since worked to document this experience and toward reconciliation. Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how this official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.

Published by Second Story Press

https://secondstorypress.ca/melanie-florence/

  • Character Education; Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance, History & Social Studies; Canadian History; First Nations & Indigenous Peoples; Government & Citizenship; Reflecting Diversity

 

Back to the Red Road (2014)

Florance Kaefer & Edward Gamblin

In 1954, when Florence Kaefer was just nineteen, she accepted a job as a teacher at Norway House Indian Residential School of Manitoba. Not fully aware of the difficult conditions the students were enduring, Florence and her fellow teachers nurtured a school full of lonely and homesick young children.

Edward was only five when he was brought to the school at Norway House and Florence remembered him as a shy and polite young boy. He left the school at sixteen and continued to face challenges in a world that was both hostile and unfamiliar to him. But Edward found success and solace in his career as a musician, writing songs about the many political issues facing Aboriginal people in Canada.

Many years later, Florence unexpectedly reconnected with him when she discovered his music. She was captivated by his voice, but shocked to hear him singing about the abuse he and the other children had been subjected to at Norway House. Motivated to apologize on behalf of the school and her colleagues, Florence contacted Edward. “Yes, I remember you and I accept your apology,” Edward told her. “Reconciliation will not be one grand, finite act. It will be a multitude of small acts and gestures played out between individuals.”

The story of their personal reconciliation is both heartfelt and heartbreaking as Edward begins to share his painful truths with his family, Florence and the media. After Edward’s death in 2010, Florence continued to advocate for truth and reconciliation. Back to the Red Road is more than their story: it is the story of our nation and how healing can begin, one friendship, one apology at a time.

Published By Caitlin Press Inc.

http://caitlin-press.com/our-books/back-to-the-red-road/

  • History; Memoirs; Residential School; Reconciliation; Identity; Loneliness

 

On the Goose:  A Labrador Métis Woman Remembers (2014)

Josie Penny

A personal and inspiring story about a young Métis woman with a history of abuse who triumphed over a harsh start in life. 

Josie Penny’s life as part of a loving Métis family in an isolated corner of Labrador changed dramatically when she was taken away to a residential school. Abused by the students, Josie became increasingly angry and isolated from her family and community as she grew into her teens. At seventeen she left for Goose Bay to make her fortune and start her own life.

On the Goose is the story of how Josie came to terms with her feelings of helplessness and isolation as she began to understand why she could not feel or express love. Josie Penny’s memoir is an inspiring true story of how love and hard work helped one woman triumph over adversity.

Published By Dundurn Publishers of Fine Books

https://www.dundurn.com/books/Goose

  • Memoirs; Métis; Identity; racism; Labrador; residential School; Goose Bay; Healing

 

A Collection of Life Stories of Survivors of the Quebec Indian Residential Schools (2013)

Marie- Thérèse Dumont

A collection of stories told by residential school survivors who attended school in the Province of Quebec.

Published By the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission

http://www.cssspnql.com/docs/centre-de-documentation/eng-cssspnql-recueil-pensionnats-réimpression.pdf?sfvrsn=2 

  • Memoirs; Residential School; Reconciliation; TRC; Culture; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal History; Identity

 

How I Survived Lejac Residential School (2013)

Ernie Leon George & Sabrina Dugan

This is the true story of Ernie George, an elderly man we met, hitching, on crutches, in 30 degree weather. When asked how many people had passed him, in the 6 hours that he had been there, he replied, “many”. We inquired why he was hitching 250km, and he explained that he needed to see a doctor about his crutches and bath seat that had not been delivered to him. When asked how he would be getting home, We were surprised to hear he would be hitching, so we offered him a ride. The next day, Ernie took us to the cemetery, where his Great Grandmother was buried. After the cemetery we visited the niece of Leon and Annie George. On our journey to Johnson Bay Landing Ernie told us many stories of his childhood. After showing us where his grandparents used to live we made our way home. The following morning, over breakfast, we asked if he would like to have his book published, as his story needed to be told. He agreed excitedly. You will be astonished at what Ernie went through in the Lejac Residential School.

 Published By Lulu Press

http://www.lulu.com/ca/en/shop/ernie-leon-george-and-sabrina-dugan/how-i-survived-lejac-residential-school/ebook/product-20916037.html

  • History; Memoirs; Residential Schools; Healing; Identity

 

Looks Like Daylight (2013)

Deborah Ellis

After her critically acclaimed books of interviews with Afghan, Iraqi, Israeli and Palestinian children, Deborah Ellis turns her attention closer to home. For two years she traveled across the United States and Canada interviewing Native children. The result is a compelling collection of interviews with children aged nine to eighteen. They come from all over the continent, from Iqaluit to Texas, Haida Gwaai to North Carolina, and their stories run the gamut — some heartbreaking; many others full of pride and hope.

You’ll meet Tingo, who has spent most of his young life living in foster homes and motels, and is now thriving after becoming involved with a Native Friendship Center; Myleka and Tulane, young artists in Utah; Eagleson, who started drinking at age twelve but now continues his family tradition working as a carver in Seattle; Nena, whose Seminole ancestors remained behind in Florida during the Indian Removals, and who is heading to New Mexico as winner of her local science fair; Isabella, who defines herself more as Native than American; Destiny, with a family history of alcoholism and suicide, who is now a writer and powwow dancer.

Many of these children are living with the legacy of the residential schools; many have lived through the cycle of foster care. Many others have found something in their roots that sustains them, have found their place in the arts, the sciences, athletics. Like all kids, they want to find something that engages them; something they love.

Deborah briefly introduces each child and then steps back, letting the kids speak directly to the reader, talking about their daily lives, about the things that interest them, and about how being Native has affected who they are and how they see the world.

As one reviewer has pointed out, Deborah Ellis gives children a voice that they may not otherwise have the opportunity to express so readily in the mainstream media. The voices in this book are as frank and varied as the children themselves.

Published By Ground Wood Books.

https://groundwoodbooks.com/looks-like-daylight/

  • Aboriginal books; National Aboriginal History Month; History; Residential Schools

 

A Look Inside (2012)

Dianne Meili

The elders in this book have devoted their lives to preserving the wisdom and spirituality of their ancestors. Despite insult and oppression, they have maintained sometimes forbidden practices for the betterment of not just their people, but all humankind. First Published in 1991.

Published by NeWest Press

https://newestpress.com/books/those-who-know-20th-anniversary-edition

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/59-9780888644985-gifted-to-learn

  • Memoirs; Trap line; Residential Schools; Jail; Ceremonies; Interviews; Elders

 

A Plains Cree Saga (2012)

David Alexander Robertson

Illustrated By Scott Henderson

Edwin is facing an uncertain future. Only by learning about his family’s past—as warriors, survivors of a smallpox epidemic, casualties of a residential school—will he be able to face the present and embrace the future.

7 Generations: A Plains Cree Saga is an epic 4-part graphic novel. Illustrated in vivid colour, the story follows one Aboriginal family over three centuries and seven generations. 7 Generations: A Plains Cree Saga includes the four graphic novels: StoneScarsEnds/Begins, and The Pact.

                Published By Highwater Press

http://www.darobertson.ca/publications/7-generations/

  • First Nations, Comic; History; Plains Cree; Residential School; Smallpox; Family: Disease; Bravery; Ancestors

 

Kiyam (Mingling Voices) (2012)

Naomi Mcllwraith

Through poems that move between the two languages, McIlwraith explores the beauty of the intersection between nêhiyawêwin, the Plains Cree language, and English, âkayâsîmowin. Written to honour her father’s facility in nêhiyawêwin and her mother’s beauty and generosity as an inheritor of Cree, Ojibwe, Scottish, and English, kiyâm articulates a powerful yearning for family, history, peace, and love.

Published By AU Press Athabasca University

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120210

  • Poetry; Nêhiyaêwin; Cree; Ojibwe; Scottish; English Kiyâm; History; Family

 

Sagkeeng Legends ( Sagkeeng Aadizookaanag) (2012)

Craig Fontaine

John C. Courchene was born in Sagkeeng First Nation in 1914, where he attended the Fort Alexander Indian Residential School. Courchene’s time in the residential school was short; his brothers, “Joejay” and Louis, took John out school so he could help them cut wood in the bush. While this helped John make a lifetime commitment to hard work, it also resulted in John being “illiterate” in the European sense of the word. In the ways of the forest and his native language, Anishanabemowin, however, John was far from illiterate. Sagkeeng Legends is a testament to John’s cultural literacy and a monument in the face of eroding Indigenous language and culture caused by centuries of colonization.

Originally recorded by John’s wife, Josephine Courchene, in the early 1980s and reprinted here in both English and Anishanabemowin by Craig Fontaine, the stories in Sagkeeng Legends represent two pebbles where a mountain of knowledge once stood. Nonetheless, this book is an important act of preserving and reintroducing Indigenous language and culture to a new generation.

Published By Ferwood Publishing

https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/sagkeeng-legends-sagkeeng-aadizookaanag

  • Indigenous Resistance; Decolonization; Residential School; Traditional life; Fort Alexander Indian Residential School

 

Sugar Falls:  A Residential School Story (2012)

David Alexander Robertson

Illustrated by Scott B. Henderson

A school assignment to interview a residential-school survivor leads Daniel to Betsy, his friend’s grandmother, who tells him her story. Abandoned as a young child, Betsy was soon adopted into a loving family. A few short years later, at the age of 8, everything changed. Betsy was taken away to a residential school. There she was forced to endure abuse and indignity, but Betsy recalled the words her father spoke to her at Sugar Falls — words that gave her the resilience, strength, and determination to survive. Sugar Falls is based on the true story of Betty Ross, Elder from Cross Lake First Nation.

Published in Canada By High Water Press

http://www.darobertson.ca/publications/sugar-falls/

  • Character Education; Empathy, Prejudice & Tolerance; History & Social Studies, Canadian History; First Nations & Indigenous Peoples; Government & Citizenship; Reflecting Diversity

 

A is for Assimilation:  The ABC’s of Canada’s Aboriginal People and Residential Schools (2011)

Len Fortune

This mini book is not meant to be accusatory, but is designed to put the basic facts/ truths down in simple words an design, providing an Aboriginal primer.

A is for assimilation, although blunt in its approach, is aimed at teens and anyone who isn’t familiar with the basic history of the nation’s First People.

Published by Ningwakwe Learning Press

https://www.strongnations.com/store/item_display.php?i=3698

  • Aboriginal Awareness; Indigenous Studies; History; Indigenous Peoples; First Nations; Residential School/ Project of the Heart, Teen Books; BC Core Competencies; Thinking; Critical Thinking; Nonfiction

 

As Long As The River Flows (2011)

James Bartkeman.

The novel follows one girl, Martha, from the Cat Lake First Nation in Northern Ontario who is “stolen” from her family at the age of six and flown far away to residential school. She doesn’t speak English but is punished for speaking her native language; most terrifying and bewildering, she is also “fed” to the school’s attendant priest with an attraction to little girls.

Ten long years later, Martha finds her way home again, barely able to speak her native tongue. The memories of abuse at the residential school are so strong that she tries to drown her feelings in drink, and when she gives birth to her beloved son, Spider, he is taken away by Children’s Aid to Toronto. In time, she has a baby girl, Raven, whom she decides to leave in the care of her mother while she braves the bewildering strangeness of the big city to find her son and bring him home.

Published by Vintage Canada

https://penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/200444/long-rivers-flow#9780307398758

  • First Nations; Residential School; Cat Lake First Nation; Children’s Aid Society

 

The Pact (2011)

David Alexander Robertson

Scott B. Henderson

As the pain and loss of James’s residential school experiences follow him into adulthood, his life spirals out of control. Haunted by guilt, he is unable to maintain a relationship with Lauren and their son Edwin. Edwin, mired in his own pain, tries to navigate past the desolation of his fatherless childhood. As James tries to heal himself he begins to realize that, somehow, he may save his son’s life – as well as his own. When father and son finally meet, can they heal their shattered relationship, and themselves, or will it be too late?

The Pact is the final book in the 7 Generations series.

http://www.darobertson.ca/publications/the-pact-book-4/

  • First Nations, Comic; History; Residential School; TRC; Reconciliation; Healing

 

Broken Circle:  The Dark Legacy of Indian Residential Schools:  A Memoir (2010)

Theodore Fontaine

Theodore (Ted) Fontaine lost his family and freedom just after his seventh birthday, when his parents were forced to leave him at an Indian residential school by order of the Roman Catholic Church and the Government of Canada. Twelve years later, he left school frozen at the emotional age of seven. He was confused, angry and conflicted, on a path of self-destruction. At age 29, he emerged from this blackness. By age 32, he had graduated from the Civil Engineering Program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology and begun a journey of self-exploration and healing.

In this powerful and poignant memoir, Ted examines the impact of his psychological, emotional and sexual abuse, the loss of his language and culture, and, most important, the loss of his family and community. He goes beyond details of the abuses of Native children to relate a unique understanding of why most residential school survivors have post-traumatic stress disorders and why succeeding generations of First Nations children suffer from this dark chapter in history.

Told as remembrances described with insights that have evolved through his healing, his story resonates with his resolve to help himself and other residential school survivors and to share his enduring belief that one can pick up the shattered pieces and use them for good.

                Published By Heritage House Publishing Co. Ltd.

http://www.heritagehouse.ca/book_details.php?isbn_upc=9781926613666

  • History; Memoirs; Residential Schools; Healing; Identity

 

Ends/ Begins (2010)

David Alexander Robertson

Scott B. Henderson

In 1964, two brothers are taken from the warm and loving care of their grandparents, and spirited away to a residential school, miles from home. James, assigned to manual work on the grounds, sees less and less of his younger brother, Thomas. James soon discovers the anguish that Thomas is living under, which leads to unspeakable tragedy. The pain and guilt that dogs James continues to affect his troubled son, Edwin (introduced in book 1). But a new understanding is dawning between them…

 Published By Highwater Press

http://www.darobertson.ca/publications/endsbegins-book-3/

  • First Nations, Comic; History; Residential School; TRC; Reconciliation; Manual Work

 

For the Children (2009)

Rita Joe

Born in 1932, in Whycocomagh, RITA JOE lived a hardscrabble existence, from foster home to foster home, experiences that helped her decide to admit herself to Shubenacadie Indian Residential School, a place most Mi’kmaq people had come to dread. It was a rare example of the child choosing Shubie, “to better myself,” to get an education. That same determination compelled her to write about her personal combination of traditional Mi’kmaw spiritualism and Catholic faith, carrying forward her ‘gentle war’. Her last poem, unfinished, was found in her typewriter when she died in March 2007.

Published By Nimbus Publishing Ltd.

https://www.nimbus.ca/store/for-the-children.html?___SID=U

  • Poetry; Mi’kMaq; Residential School

 

My Heart Shook Like A Drum (2009)

Alice Blondin- Perrin

My Heart Shook Like a Drum (2009), by Alice Blondin-Perrin, is a true-life account of the author’s childhood experiences in the Canadian residential school system. Blondin-Perrin lived in Cameron Bay, Northwest Territories, with her family until she was taken away at the age of four and placed into the first of many residential schools. The book recounts her experiences of abuse at the hands of nuns in the schools and the suppression of her Dene language and culture. Blondin-Perrin details the journey to reclaim her Indigenous culture and overcome the pain of her time in the schools.

Published by Borealis Book Publishers

http://www.borealispress.com/myheartshooklikeadrum.html

  • Indigenous Peoples; History; Memoirs; Residential Schools; Healing; Dene

 

Where the Blood Mixes (2009)

Kevin Loring

Where the Blood Mixes is meant to expose the shadows below the surface of the author’s First Nations heritage, and to celebrate its survivors. Though torn down years ago, the memories of their Residential School still live deep inside the hearts of those who spent their childhoods there. For some, like Floyd, the legacy of that trauma has been passed down through families for generations. But what is the greater story, what lies untold beneath Floyd’s alcoholism, under the pain and isolation of the play’s main character?

Loring’s title was inspired by the mistranslation of the N’lakap’mux (Thompson) place name Kumsheen. For years, it was believed to mean “the place where the rivers meet”—the confluence of the muddy Fraser and the brilliant blue Thompson Rivers. A more accurate translation is: “the place inside the heart where the blood mixes.” But Kumsheen also refers to a story: Coyote was disemboweled there, along a great cliff in an epic battle with a giant shape-shifting being that could transform the world with its powers—to this day his intestines can still be seen strewn along the granite walls. In his rage the transformer tore Coyote apart and scattered his body across the nation, his heart landing in the place where the rivers meet.

Published By Talon Books

* Won the Jessie Richardson Award for Outstanding Original Script; the Sydney J. Risk Prize for Outstanding Original Script by an Emerging Playwright; Awarded the Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama

http://talonbooks.com/books/where-the-blood-mixes

  • Play; Residential School; Trauma; Addictions;

 

Moving Beyond:  Understanding the Impacts of the Residential Schools (2007)

Brent Stonefish

The residential school system in Canada continues to have a significant impact on Aboriginal people.  We continue to struggle with trauma of the unwanted legacy.

In this book, we take a look at the history but focus on the intergenerational impacts that exist today from the residential school system.  These lasting impacts affect learning, education, and family relations.

“Moving beyond” highlights positive approaches and paths to healing and promotes the development of healthy individuals, families and communities.

Published by Ningwakwe Learning Press

https://www.strongnations.com/store/item_display.php?i=3623&f=

  • Aboriginal Awareness; Building Strong Nations; Personal Development; Educator Resources; Building Strong Learning; Social Studies Resources; Residential School/ Project of the Heart

 

Three Plays:  The Indolent Boys, Children of the Sun, and The Moon in Two Windows (2007)

Scott N. Momaday

Long a leading figure in American literature, N. Scott Momaday is perhaps best known for his Pulitzer Prize–winning House Made of Dawn and his celebration of his Kiowa ancestry, The Way to Rainy Mountain. Momaday has also made his mark in theater through two plays and a screenplay. Published here for the first time, they display his signature talent for interweaving oral and literary traditions.

The Indolent Boys recounts the 1891 tragedy of runaways from the Kiowa Boarding School who froze to death while trying to return to their families. The play explores the consequences, for Indian students and their white teachers, of the federal program to “kill the Indian and save the Man.” A joyous counterpoint to this tragedy, Children of the Sun is a short children’s play that explains the people’s relationship to the sun. The Moon in Two Windows, a screenplay set in the early 1900s, centers on the children of defeated Indian tribes, who are forced into assimilation at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where the U.S. government established the first off-reservation boarding school.

Belonging with the best of Momaday’s classic writing, these plays are works of a mature craftsman that preserve the mythic and cultural tradition of unique tribal communities in the face of an increasingly homogeneous society

Published by the University of Oklahoma Press

 https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1265644.Three_Plays

  • Play; Residential School; Run-aways; Drama

 

Behind Closed Doors (2006)

Jack Angus eds.

Behind Closed Doors features written testimonials from thirty-two individuals who attended the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The school was one of many infamous residential schools that operated from 1893 to 1979. The storytellers remember and share with us their stolen time at the school; many stories are told through courageous tears.

Published by Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/Behind-Closed-Doors-Stories-from-the-Kamloops-Indian-Residential-School

  • First Nations; Residential School; Biography; Testimonials; Kamloops Indian Residential School; Courage

 

Treaty Promises, Indian Reality (2005)

Harold LeRat & Linda Ungar

The vast open plains of the prairies drew thousands of settlers to the Canadian West. But what of the people who already inhabited these lands? The federal government promised to care for the Indians in perpetuity and in return, the nomadic Indians would sign treaties, settle on reserves, and learn to be farmers. Many Indians, including those led by Chief Cowessess, camped and hunted in the Cypress Hills where there was plenty of game, water, and wood. Forced out of the Hills by the government and driven by hunger to a reserve in the Qu’Appelle Valley, Cowessess and his people were successful farmers, but they had little control over what was supposed to be their land.

The story of life on reserves after treaty is a story of power: the power of Indian Affairs. Indian agents controlled every aspect of life on and off reserve – the dreaded pass system and permission slips needed to sell farm produce, or not as it suited the agents; the instructors whose job it was to transform Indian hunters into farmers; the residential school system, and the questionable surrender of reserve land. Yet, this book does not make a political statement. It does not judge the actions of the government, its agents, or anyone else. In an ever-respectful voice, this book relates things as they were, and points to the many successes of Indian peoples despite the many challenges they faced.

This book is a story of triumph over adversity and oppression. In this very personal account of life on an Indian reserve and in residential schools, Harold LeRat, with the assistance of writer Linda Ungar, relates the history of the Cowessess people based on stories told by elders, research he did in connection with the land surrender, and his own recollections. In many ways, this book provides a look at the Indian reality of the lives of many First Nations peoples and the development of reserves on the Prairies. Anyone interested in the history of the west will treasure this book.

                Published by Purich Publishing

https://www.ubcpress.ca/treaty-promises-indian-reality

  • Federal Government; Reserves; Cowessess; Cypress Hills; Saskatchewan; Treaty; Residential School System; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal Communities; Churches; Culture; Facilitation Guide; TRC; Biographies; Canada

 

Good For Nothing (2004)

Michel Noel

The year is 1959, and fifteen-year-old Nipishish returns to his reserve in northern Quebec after being kicked out of residential school, where the principal tells him he’s a good-for-nothing who, like all Indians, can look forward to a life of drunkenness, prison and despair.

The reserve, however, offers nothing to Nipishish. He remembers little of his late mother and father. In fact, he seems to know less about himself than the people at the band office. He must try to rediscover the old ways, face the officials who find him a threat, and learn the truth about his father’s death.

Published by Groundwood Books

* Winner of the Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction for Young People 2005;

Short-listed for the McNally Robinson Aboriginal Book of the Year Award 2005;

Selected for the CCBC Our Choice 2005; Selected for the IBBY Honor List 2006

https://houseofanansi.com/collections/imprint-groundwood/products/good-for-         

  • Residential Schools; Quebec; Family; Culture; Tradition; Native Canadian; Indigenous Peoples; TRC

 

Children Left Behind:  The Dark Legacy of Indian Mission Boarding Schools (2002)

Tim Giago

Tim Giago weaves memoir, commentary, reflection and poetry together to boldly illustrate his often-horrific experiences as a child at an Indian Mission boarding school run by the Catholic Church. Through his words, the experience of one Indian child becomes a metaphor for the experience of many who were literally ripped from their tribal roots and torn from their families for nine months of the year in order to be molded to better fit into mainstream America. They were not allowed to speak their own languages or follow their traditional customs, and cases of physical, sexual and psychological abuse were common. As a result, the Mission school experience often resulted in isolation, confusion, and intense psychological pain. This has contributed to problems including alcoholism, drug abuse, family violence and general alienation in an entire generation of Native Americans. Dramatic and intensely moving black-and white illustrations by Giago’s daughter Denise illuminate the text.

 Published by Clear Light Publishing

http://www.clearlightbooks.com/shop/children-left-behind-the-dark-legacy-of-indian-mission-boarding-schools/

  • Residential Schools; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal Communities; Churches; Poetry; Tribal Roots; Mission Schools; Boarding Schools; Catholic Church: Psychological Pain; Lakota; Native American; Culture  

 

Misty Lake:  A Play, paper red (2000)

Dale Lakevold & Darrell Racine

Misty Lake: A Play is co-written by Dale Lakevold and Darrell Racine about residential school experiences. The main characters in the drama are Patty, 25-year-old Métis journalist, and Mary, a 43-year-old Dene woman, who survived her residential school experiences. Their connections bring up distant and painful memories of childhood and broken families but they also bring forth laughter amid the tears. Each character finds her way back from the pain to begin a path of healing. The play is based on the lived experiences of Elizabeth Samuel who attended Guy Hill Indian Residential School in The Pas, Manitoba. The 82-page book contains an afterword from Darrell Racine, excerpts from his interview with Elizabeth Samuel, notes about the 4 characters, and photographs of Guy Hill Residential School. It was first performed in 1999. This is the fourth edition of this title.

Published By Loon Books

http://www.loonbooks.ca/misty_lake.html

  • Play; Métis; Residential School; English Literature; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Drama

 

Indian School Days (1988)

Basil H. Johnson

This book is the humorous, bitter-sweet autobiography of a Canadian Ojibwa who was taken from his family at age ten and placed in Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario. It was 1939 when the feared Indian agent visited Basil Johnston’s family and removed him and his four-year-old sister to St. Peter Claver’s school, run by the priests in a community known as Spanish, 75 miles from Sudbury.

Spanish! It was a word synonymous with residential school, penitentiary, reformatory, exile, dungeon, whippings, kicks, slaps, all rolled into one,” Johnston recalls. But despite the aching loneliness, the deprivation, the culture shock and the numbing routine, his story is engaging and compassionate. Johnston creates marvelous portraits of the young Indian boys who struggled to adapt to strange ways and unthinking, unfeeling discipline. Even the Jesuit teachers, whose flashes of humor occasionally broke through their stern demeanor, are portrayed with an understanding born of hindsight.

Published By University of Oklahoma Press

http://www.oupress.com/ECommerce/Book/Detail/567/indian%20school%20days

  • History; Memoirs; Residential School; Identity; Loneliness

 

Song of Eskasoni:  More Poems of Rita Joe (1988)

Rita Joe

“I was born in Whycocomagh in 1932. When mother died in 1937 there were many foster homes until I was twelve years old. I put myself into the Indian Residential School in Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia. That school plays an important part in my life, along with native upbringing by many mothers.

My education is by my people – I have a front seat to see and feel their needs, the major one being that we, too, live with ideal productiveness. The label is deeply rooted and the stroke of a native pen does wonders, especially for the coming generation.

The importance of my country is why I try to portray the Indian as they are, so that others may see the part we play in our society. If I get too sentimental in my choice of words, excuse me. I have to call attention to the gentle peopleof Canada. My song is gentle, bear with me. I still want to offer my hand in friendship, the Indian of today.”

Published in the Tepi’ketuek Mi’kmaw Archives

http://mikmawarchives.ca/documents/song-of-eskasoni-more-poems-of-rita-joe

  • Poetry; Mi’kMaq; Residential School

 

April Raintree (1984)

Beatrice Culleton Mosionier

Two young sisters are taken from their home and family. Powerless to change their fortunes, they are separated, and each put into different foster homes. Yet over the years, the bond between them grows. As they each make their way in a society that is, at times, indifferent, hostile, and violent, one embraces her Métis identity, while the other tries to leave it behind. In the end, out of tragedy, comes an unexpected legacy of triumph and reclamation.

Published By Portage and Main Press

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/april-raintree/

  • Aboriginal books; National Aboriginal History; History; Residential Schools; Foster Care; Métis; 60’s Scoop

 

Poems of Rita Joe (1978)

Rita Joe

A Collection of poetry written by renowned Mi’kMaq

 poet and survivor of the Shubenacadie Indian Residential School, Rita Joe

Published by Abanaki Press

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4504751-poems-of-rita-joe

  • Poetry; Mi’kMaq; Residential School

Indigenous History, Culture & Contemporary Topics

 

Making it Right (2016)

Marilee Peters

What if there were no prisons? Alternative approaches to dealing with crime are underway around the world to explore how victims, offenders, and communities can heal rifts and repair damage. It’s often called restorative justice. It’s a way to think about the deeper reasons behind crimes, and suggests that by building more caring communities, it’s possible to change society—and ourselves.

Making It Right relates true stories of young people who are working in innovative ways to further conflict resolution and heal past wounds. The book begins with individual injustices, such as bullying, and works up to collective ones, like wars. Each chapter begins with a dramatic fictional account, making the topic engaging and relevant for kids.

Restorative justice isn’t going to change the world overnight, nor will it end all crime or prevent all wars. But it’s a powerful way to get teens thinking about how they can participate in building a more peaceful society

Published By Annick Press

* Nautilus Book Award Eric Hoffer Award; Honorable Mention Skipping Stones Honor Book Best Books for Kids & Teens 2017; Canadian Children’s Book Centre da Vinci Eye Award finalist; Montaigne Medal finalist

http://www.annickpress.com/Making-It-Right

  • Justice; Conflict Resolution; Current events; History; Mediation; Native peoples; Peoples; Peace; Problem Solving; Social Studies; Society; Social Activism; Global Studies; Restorative Justice

 

Betty (2015)

David Alexander Robertson

Illustrated By Scott Henderson

Helen Betty Osborne, known as Betty to her closest friends and family, dreamed of becoming a teacher. She left her home to attend residential school and high school in a small town in Manitoba. On November 13, 1971, Betty was abducted and brutally murdered by four young men. Initially met with silence and indifference, her tragic murder resonates loudly today. Betty represents one of almost 1,200 Indigenous women in Canada who have been murdered or gone missing. This book is a true account.  Content may be disturbing for some viewers.

Published by Highwater Press

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  • First Nations, Comic; History; MMIW; MMIWG2S; Family

 

A Blanket of Butterflies (2015)

Richard Van Camp

Illustrated by Scott henderson

A Blanket of Butterflies explores the journey of Shinobu, a mysterious stranger who visits Fort Smith, NWT, to retrieve his family’s samurai suit of armor and sword from the museum. When he discovers that his grandfather’s sword has been lost in a poker game to the man they call “Benny the Bank,” he sets out to retrieve it, with the help of a young boy, Sonny, and his grandmother. Together, they face Benny and his men, Torchy, Sfen and the giant they call Flinch. This graphic novel, beautifully illustrated by Scott B. Henderson, explores the grace of family and the power of the Great Mystery. A Blanket of Butterflies is nominated for a 2016 Eisner Award for Best Single Issue/One-Shot.

Published By Portage and Main Press

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/a-blanket-of-butterflies/

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature; Debwe Series

 

Nisto Mekwana/ Three Feathers (2015)

Richard Van Camp

Illustrated by Krystal Mateus

Three young men — Flinch, Bryce, and Rupert — have vandalized their community. They are sent by its Elders to live nine months on the land as part of the circle sentencing process. There, the young men learn to take responsibility for their actions and acquire the humility required to return home. But will they be forgiven for what they have done? Three Feathers explores the power and grace of restorative justice in on Northern community and the cultural legacy that can empower furture generations.

Published By Highwater Press

https://49thshelf.com/Books/N/Nisto-Mekwana-Three-Feathers

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature; Elders

 

 

Red Wolf (2014)

Jennifer Dance

Life is changing for Canada’s Anishnaabe Nation and for the wolf packs that share their territory.

In the late 1800s, both Native people and wolves are being forced from the land. Starving and lonely, an orphaned timber wolf is befriended by a boy named Red Wolf. But under the Indian Act, Red Wolf is forced to attend a residential school far from the life he knows, and the wolf is alone once more. Courage, love and fate reunite the pair, and they embark on a perilous journey home. But with winter closing in, will Red Wolf and Crooked Ear survive? And if they do, what will they find?

 Published by Dundurn Publishers of Fine Books

* Moonbeam Children’s Book Award 2014; Forest of Reading, Shortlisted Silver Birch Awards; Shortlisted MYRCA Award 2016; Toronto  Public Library’s 2015 Great Reads for Kids Collection

https://www.dundurn.com/books/Red-Wolf

  • First Nations; Indian Act; Traditional Stories; Traditional First Nations; Native Peoples; Historical; Canadian

 

The Gift Is In The Making (2013)

Leanne Simpson

The Gift Is in the Making retells previously published Anishinaabeg stories, bringing to life Anishinaabeg values and teachings to a new generation. Readers are immersed in a world where all genders are respected, the tiniest being has influence in the world, and unconditional love binds families and communities to each other and to their homeland. Sprinkled with gentle humour and the Anishinaabe language, this collection of stories speaks to children and adults alike, and reminds us of the timelessness of stories that touch the heart.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Winner of the RBC Taylor Emerging Author Award; A SOLS First Nation Communities READ Recommended Title; 2015-2016 Approved resource for Manitoba Classrooms

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/the-gift-is-in-the-making/

  • Indigenous Literature; The Debwe Series

 

Kitosayiminawak Pikiskwewak. The healing edition: Our Young People Speak (2013)

Prairie Valley School Division

Student authors from Prairie Valley published Kitoskâyiminawak Pîkiskwêwak: Our Young People Speak – the Treaty Edition at the end of the 2014 school year. The students involved researched and interviewed leaders and Elders about contemporary treaty topics. This is the third in a series following the Leadership Edition and the Healing Edition. Each publication is available for purchase for $15.

Published By The Prairie Valley School Division

http://saskoutdoors.org/resources/kitoskayiminawak-pikiskwewak-our-young-people-speak

  • Elders; Saskatchewan; Treaty

 

Scars (2010)

David Alexander Robertson

Illustrated By Scott Henderson

Scars introduces White Cloud, a young Plains Cree boy, in the year 1870, when the last great smallpox epidemic swept through the prairies. After witnessing, one by one, the death of his family from the illness, he summons the strength to journey on to find a new home and deliver himself from the terrible disease. But will he make it? Scars follows White Cloud and the people he encounters, as he struggles to survive against impossible odds.

The book also reconnects readers to Edwin, a lost young man on his own quest who was introduced in book 1, Stone. By learning about the bravery and perseverance of his ancestor White Cloud, Edwin summons his own courage and travels to confront the main source of his despair: the father he barely knows.

 Published By Highwater Press

http://www.darobertson.ca/publications/scars-book-2/

  • First Nations, Comic; History; Plains Cree; Smallpox; Family: Disease; Bravery; Ancestors

 

Son of the Fur Trade:  The Memoirs of Johnny Grant (2008)

 John Francais Grant

Born in 1833 at Fort Edmonton, Johnny Grant experienced and wrote about many historical events in the Canada-US northwest, and died within sight of the same fort in 1907. Grant was not only a fur trader; he was instrumental in early ranching efforts in Montana and played a pivotal role in the Riel Resistance of 1869-70. Published in its entirety for the first time, Grant’s memoir-with a perceptive introduction by Gerhard Ens-is an indispensable primary source for the shelves of fur trade and Métis historians.

 Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/266-9780888644916-son-of-the-fur-trade

  • History; Memoirs; Métis; Identity; Fur Trade; Northwest

 

That Tongues Belonging (2007)

Marilyn Dumont

The newest book from award-winning Metis poet Marilyn Dumont, is a collection of poems which search for acceptance in language, culture, love and geographical land- scapes. These poems celebrate the humour and tenacity of Aboriginal women, lament the death of a mother and recall the degradation of Aboriginal women, while challenging accepted ideas of love, age and femininity.

Published By Kegedonce Press

https://kegedonce.com/bookstore/item/47-that-tongued-belonging.html

  • Poetry; Language; Culture; Love; Geographical Landscapes; Aboriginal Women

 

The Medicine Shows (2002)

Danial David Moses

In these linked plays, Daniel David Moses, Prize winning playwright and “registered Indians”, explores the frontier and discovers that the human face of the old West was more than cowboys and Indians.

Published By Exile Editions

http://www.exileeditions.com/shop/the-indian-medicine-shows/

  • Play; Western; One Act Plays

 

Return to the Drum:  Teaching Among the Dene in Canada’s North (2000)

Miggs Wynne Morris

“The adventure begins when Miggs Wynne Morris, a young Welsh teacher, accepts a position to live and teach in the small, isolated community of Fort Franklin in the Northwest territories in 1965. The second part of the book documents her return to that village, now called Deline, in 1995.

Published By NeWest Press

https://newestpress.com/books/return-to-the-drum-teaching-among-the-dene-in-canadas-north

  • Fiction; Dene; Drum; Teaching; Fort Franklin

 

Nahanni Remembered (1997)

AC Lewis

Set in 1937, this is the story of four winter months the author spent at a trapping camp in the Nahanni Valley and the trip rafting back to civilization down the flood-swollen Nahanni River.

Published By NeWest Press

http://newestpress.com/authors/ac-lewis

  • Indigenous; Trapping; Trapping Camp; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples

 

Yamoria The Lawmaker (1997)

George Blondin

Dene Elder George Blondin creates a spiritual guidebook that weaves together oral stories with the recounting of how the northern Canadian Dene came to depend on the European fur traders. The result is a magical journey for readers of any heritage.

                Published by NeWestPress

https://newestpress.com/books/yamoria-the-lawmaker-0

  • First Nations; Oral Stories; Traditional Stories; Dene; History; Canada; Teachers; Wisdom Keepers

 

Really Good Brown Girl (1996)

Marilyn Dumont

First published in 1996, A Really Good Brown Girl is a fierce, honest and courageous account of what it takes to grow into one’s self and one’s Metis heritage in the face of myriad institutional and cultural obstacles. It is an indispensable contribution to Canadian literature.

Published By Brick Books

https://www.brickbooks.ca/books/a-really-good-brown-girl-2/

  • Poetry; Anthology; Métis; Culture; Institutions

 

Artic Dreams and Nightmares (1993)

Alootook Ipellie

An intricate blending of written and visual imagery, this book is an Arctic journey interpreted through the mythological world of Inuit. With twenty short stories and accompanying pen ink drawings, it is the first publication to exclusively feature the writing and artwork of Alootook Ipellie.

Published By Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/Arctic-Dreams-and-Nightmares

  • Fiction; Visual Imagery; Artic Journey; Mythology; Illustrations

 

My Name is Masak (1992)

Alice French

110 clean, tightly bound pages with index. Illustrated with bw photographs. Colour photo illustrated covers clean and without wear. Binding square and not creased. Originally published 1976. Sequel to The Restless Nomad which told of the author’s life from 1945 until the late 1970s, “My Name Is Masak is an enchanting book told through the eyes of a petient and perceptive child, about the Western Arctic and its people. 

                Published By Peguis Publishing Ltd.

https://www.abebooks.com/first-edition/Name-Masak-French-Alice-Peguis-Pub/1419745806/bd

  • History; Memoirs; Artic; Identity

 

All My Relations:  An Anthology of Contemporary Canadian Native Prose (1990)

Thomas King

Features works from nineteen contemporary Native American writers including Jeanette C. Armstrong, Beth Brant, Richard G. Green, Thomas King, and Barry Milliken

Published By Penguin Random House

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/93026/all-my-relations-by-thomas-king/9780771067068/

  • Fiction; Native American Writers; Anthologies; Literature

 

Toronto at Dreamer’s Rock/Education is Our Right (1990)

Drew Hayden Taylor

In these two plays, Drew Taylor delves into the past and speculates about the future as he examines the dilemmas facing young Native Canadians today.

TORONTO AT DREAMER’S ROCK is a moving portrayal of a teenage boy who is torn between the traditions of his people, which he only vaguely understands, and the lure of modern life. His magical encounters with two members of his tribe – one from 400 years in the past and one from the future – make him aware of how little he has thought about what it means to be an Indian.

EDUCATION IS OUR RIGHT borrows from the familiar story of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, but in this version the spirits of Education Past, Present and Future attempt to show the Minister of Indian Affairs the error of his ways.

Published By Fifth House Publishers

http://www.drewhaydentaylor.com/books/toronto-at-dreamers-rock/

  • Play; Humour; Passion; Spirituality; Realism

 

Stoney Creek Woman:  The Story of Mary John (1988)

Bridget Moran

The captivating story of Mary John (who passed away in 2004), a pioneering Carrier Native whose life on the Stoney Creek reserve in central BC is a capsule history of First Nations life from a unique woman’s perspective. A mother of twelve, Mary endured much tragedy and heartbreak-the pangs of racism, poverty, and the deaths of six children-but lived her life with extraordinary grace and courage. Years after her death, she continues to be a positive role model for Aboriginals across Canada. In 1997 she received the Order of Canada. This edition of Stoney Creek Woman, one of Arsenal’s all-time bestsellers, includes a new preface by author Bridget Moran, and new photographs. 

Published by Arsenal Pulp Press

* Shortlisted for the Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize

http://www.arsenalpulp.com/bookinfo.php?index=81

  • Memoirs; Stoney Creek; Loss; Identity; racism; Mother; Poverty

 

John Tootoosis (1982)

 Jean Goodwill & Norma Sluman

Original pictoral wrappers; spine title in white. Illustrated with B / W photographs and reproductions in text. Oral history of the Cree leader John Tootoosis by his daughter, Jean Goodwill. Tootoosis grew up on the Poundmaker Reserve and became an important figure in the League of Indians of Canada during the 1930s. Signed by John B. Tootoosis. 

 Published By Pemmican Publications Canada

https://www.abebooks.com/John-Tootoosis-Goodwill-Jean-Sluman-Norma/14451973265/bd

  • History; Memoirs; Cree leaders; Identity

 

Loveshine and Red Wine (1981)

Duke Redbird

This book of poems by Duke Redbird is a masterpiece. His poetry is as stunningly beautiful and authentic as a sculpture by Auguste Rodin, and he uses words as Michelangelo used the artists tools.

Published By Woodland Studios Publications

https://books.google.ca/books/about/Loveshine_and_Red_Wine.html?id=tDsJYAAACAAJ&redir_esc=y

  • Poetry; Indigenous Canadian Poet; Activist; First Nations Literature

 

Paper Stays Put:  A Collection of Inuit Writing (1980)

Robin Gedalof eds.

Illustrations Alootook Ipellie

A collection of works writer by Inuit authors

Published By University of Washington Press

https://openlibrary.org/books/OL9766745M/Paper_Stays_Put

  • Fiction; Inuit; Literature; Indigenous Peoples

 

Flint and Feather (1912)

Emily Pauline Johnson

A Collection of poetry by Emily Pauline Johnson

Published on the Canadian Poetry Website

http://www.canadianpoetry.ca/confederation/johnson/flint_and_feather/index.htm

  • Poetry; White Wampum; Canadian; Indigenous Peoples; Settler

 

Aboriginal Healing Foundation:  Helping Aboriginal People Heal Themselves

Aboriginal Healing Foundation

A website containing numerous documents related to residential school.  Publication and resources include legal documents, an evaluation series, research series, newsletters, Residential School Resources, press releases and open editorials, and speeches.

Published by the Aboriginal Healing Foundation

http://www.ahf.ca/publications

Healing; Residential Schools; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Native Studies

Readings

Reconciliation and Residential Schools

A Girl Called Echo (2017)

Katherena Vermette & Scott Henderson

Echo Desjardins, a 13-year-old Métis girl adjusting to a new home and school, is struggling with loneliness while separated from her mother. Then an ordinary day in Mr. Bee’s history class turns extraordinary, and Echo’s life will never be the same. During Mr. Bee’s lecture, Echo finds herself transported to another time and place—a bison hunt on the Saskatchewan prairie—and back again to the present. In the following weeks, Echo slips back and forth in time. She visits a Métis camp, travels the old fur-trade routes, and experiences the perilous and bygone era of the Pemmican Wars.

Pemmican Wars is the first graphic novel in a new series, A Girl Called Echo, by Governor General Award–winning writer, and author of Highwater Press’ The Seven Teaching Stories, Katherena Vermette.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Chosen for best Canadian Book Cover of 2017 by CBC Books

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/pemmican-wars/

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature

 

The Reason You Walk:  A Memoir (2015)

Wab Kinew

When his father was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer, Winnipeg broadcaster and musician Wab Kinew decided to spend a year reconnecting with the accomplished but distant aboriginal man who’d raised him. The Reason You Walk spans the year 2012, chronicling painful moments in the past and celebrating renewed hopes and dreams for the future. As Kinew revisits his own childhood in Winnipeg and on a reserve in Northern Ontario, he learns more about his father’s traumatic childhood at residential school. An intriguing doubleness marks The Reason You Walk, a reference to an Anishinaabe ceremonial song. Born to an Anishinaabe father and a non-native mother, he has a foot in both cultures. He is a Sundancer, an academic, a former rapper, a hereditary chief, and an urban activist. His father, Tobasonakwut, was both a beloved traditional chief and a respected elected leader who engaged directly with Ottawa. Internally divided, his father embraced both traditional native religion and Catholicism, the religion that was inculcated into him at the residential school where he was physically and sexually abused. In a grand gesture of reconciliation, Kinew’s father invited the Roman Catholic bishop of Winnipeg to a Sundance ceremony in which he adopted him as his brother. Kinew writes affectingly of his own struggles in his twenties to find the right path, eventually giving up a self-destructive lifestyle to passionately pursue music and martial arts. From his unique vantage point, he offers an inside view of what it means to be an educated aboriginal living in a country that is just beginning to wake up to its aboriginal history and living presence. 
 Invoking hope, healing and forgiveness, The Reason You Walk is a poignant story of a towering but damaged father and his son as they embark on a journey to repair their family bond. By turns lighthearted and solemn, Kinew gives us an inspiring vision for family and cross-cultural reconciliation, and a wider conversation about the future of aboriginal peoples.

Published By Pemmican Random House Canada

* #1 Globe and Mail Nonfiction Bestseller; A Toronto Star Nonfiction Bestseller; Finalist for the RBC Taylor Prize; Shortlisted for the Ontario Library Service North 2017 Louise de Kiriline Award for Nonfiction

https://penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/417538/reason-you-walk#9780143193555

  • History; Memoirs; Intergenerational Impacts; Residential School; Reconciliation; Identity

 

Up Ghost River:  A Chief’s Journey Through the Turbulent Waters of Native History (2015)

Edmund Metatawabin & Alexandra Shimo.

In the 1950s, 7-year-old Edmund Metatawabin was separated from his family and placed in one of Canada’s worst residential schools. St. Anne’s, in north­ern Ontario, is an institution now notorious for the range of punishments that staff and teachers inflicted on students. Even as Metatawabin built the trappings of a successful life—wife, kids, career—he was tormented by horrific memories. Fuelled by alcohol, the trauma from his past caught up with him, and his family and work lives imploded.

In seeking healing, Metatawabin travelled to southern Alberta. There he learned from elders, par­ticipated in native cultural training workshops that emphasize the holistic approach to personhood at the heart of Cree culture, and finally faced his alcoholism and PTSD. Metatawabin has since worked tirelessly to expose the wrongdoings of St. Anne’s, culminating in a recent court case demanding that the school records be released to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Now Metatawabin’s mission is to help the next generation of residential school survivors. His story is part of the indigenous resurgence that is happening across Canada and worldwide: after years of oppression, he and others are healing themselves by rediscovering their culture and sharing their knowledge. 

Coming full circle, Metatawabin’s haunting and brave narrative offers profound lessons on the impor­tance of bearing witness, and the ability to become whole once again.

 Published by Penguin Random House Canada

https://penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/227773/ghost-river#9780307399885

  • Reconciliation; TRC; Literature; Stories; Healing; Residential School; Activism; Colonialism; Racism; Addiction; Recovery; Can

 

God and the Indian (2014)

Drew Hayden Taylor

While panhandling outside a coffee shop, Johnny, a Cree woman who lives on the streets, is shocked to recognize a face from her childhood, which was spent in a residential school. Desperate to hear the man acknowledge the terrible abuse he inflicted on her and other children at the school, Johnny follows Anglican bishop George King to his office to confront him.

Inside King’s office, Johnny’s memories are fluid, shifting, and her voice cracks with raw emotion. Is the bishop actually guilty of what she claims, or has her ability to recollect been altered by poverty, abuse, and starvation experienced on the streets? Can her memories be trusted? Who is responsible for what?

At its core, God and the Indian, by celebrated Aboriginal playwright Drew Hayden Taylor, explores the complex process of healing through dialogue. Loosely based on Death and the Maiden by Chilean playwright Ariel Dorfman, the play identifies the ambiguities that frame past traumatic events. Against the backdrop of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has facilitated the recent outpouring of stories from residential school survivors across the country, the play explores what is possible when the abused meets the abuser and is given a free forum for expression.

Published By Talon Books

http://talonbooks.com/books/god-and-the-indian

  • Play; Residential School; Abuse’ Cultural Genocide; Healing; Reconciliation

 

The Dance of Wiindigo and Nanaboozhou (2011)

Robert Bensen eds.

The Dance of Wiindigo and Nanaboozhou is a collection of First People’s responses to the questions of what is hatred and racism.

This is a celebration of traditional teachings from Elders, activists, teachers and Wisdom Keepers of diverse Indigenous Nations across this land. It is a story that addresses the realities of residential schools, child welfare, women’s issues, land reclamation, the justice system and gender/sexuality for Native peoples. It invites both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people to examine what it means to transcend the historical and present prejudices that give rise to hatred and violence.

                Published by Women’s Circle Limited

http://metiswomenscircle.ca/baskets-berries/

  • First Nations; Residential School; Traditional Stories; Child Welfare; Teachers; Wisdom Keepers; Social Services; History

From Lishamie (2010)

Albert J. Canadien

With astonishing detail, Albert Canadien fondly recounts his boyhood years in Lishamie, a traditional Dene camp north of the Mackenzie River, and reflects on the devastating and long-lasting impact residential schooling had on him, his family and his people. Separated at a young age from his parents and forced to attend a strict Catholic boarding school, the author—and many like him—was robbed of his language, community and traditional way of living. From Lishamieis a candid memoir of loss and of the journey back.

                Published by Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/From-Lishamie

  • First Nations; Biography; Memoirs; Ethnic; National; Native American; Native Peoples; Historical; Canadian

 

Coach Tommy Thompson & the Boys of Sequoyah (2009)

Patti Dickenson

When eleven-year-old Tommy Thompson arrived at a government-run Indian boarding school in 1915, it seemed a last resort for the youngster. Instead, it turned out to be the first step toward a life dedicated to helping others. Thompson went on to become a star athlete and football coach—a Cherokee legend whose story is remembered by many and is now finally told for a wider audience.

Following gridiron fame at Northeastern State College, Thompson returned to Sequoyah Vocational School in 1947 as Boys’ Coach and Advisor. More than a thousand boys attended the boarding school during the eleven years he coached there. Writing for readers old and young, Patti Dickinson tells the inspiring story of how this one man made a difference in the lives of a generation of Indian youth.

Through football, Thompson taught his boys the skills and values they would need to succeed in life, and twice led his team to the state finals. Dickinson describes the success of that program, including one epic, rain-soaked championship game. She paints compelling portraits of Thompson’s boys—the men whose firsthand stories and reminiscences form the basis of the narrative—and re-creates daily life at the school.

To his boys, Thompson was Ah-sky-uh, “the man,” a Cherokee term of respect. Half a century after his death, Sequoyah High School still reveres his memory. This book secures his place in history as it opens a new window on the boarding school experience.

 Published by The University of Oklahoma Press

http://www.pattianndickinson.org/coach_tommy_thompson___the_boys_of_sequoyah_109703.htm

  • Off- reservation Boarding Schools; Cherokee; Indigenous Peoples; Education; Cultural Assimilation; Sport; Coaching; Athlete; Role Models

 

Two Trails Narrow (2008)

Stephan McGregor

Ryman McGregor and Abraham Scott have a lot in common. Both are Algonquin half-breeds unhappily attending St. Xavier’s Residential School in Ontario and desperately seeking to escape the clutches of the abusive Jesuit priests. One night, the boys—along with Ryman’s sister—make a break for it, but RCMP trackers quickly pick up their trail. The runaways barely evade capture and begin the long journey to their respective homes, where they part company.

But years later Ryman’s and Abraham’s paths cross again. This time they are men fighting in one of Canada’s best military units in Europe during World War II. They see the horrors of war through soldiers’ eyes, and they reunite with two nursing sisters, Belle O’Hara and Brenda Parker, whom Ryman and Abraham knew in their youth.

 Published by Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/Two-Trails-Narrow

  • Reconciliation; Residential School; World War II; RCMP

 

Children of the DrangonFly:  Native American Voices of Child Custody and Education (2001)

Robert Bensen eds.

Native American children have long been subject to removal from their homes for placement in residential schools and, more recently, in foster or adoptive homes. The governments of both the United States and Canada, having reduced Native nations to the legal status of dependent children, historically have asserted a surrogate parentalism over Native children themselves.

Children of the Dragonfly is the first anthology to document this struggle for cultural survival on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border. Through autobiography and interviews, fiction and traditional tales, official transcripts and poetry, these voices— Seneca, Cherokee, Mohawk, Navajo, and many others— weave powerful accounts of struggle and loss into a moving testimony to perseverance and survival. Invoking the dragonfly spirit of Zuni legend who helps children restore a way of life that has been taken from them, the anthology explores the breadth of the conflict about Native childhood.

Included are works of contemporary authors Sherman Alexie, Joy Harjo, Luci Tapahonso, and others; classic writers Zitkala-Sa and E. Pauline Johnson; and contributions from twenty important new writers as well. They take readers from the boarding school movement of the 1870s to the Sixties Scoop in Canada and the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 in the United States. They also spotlight the tragic consequences of racist practices such as the suppression of Indian identity in government schools and the campaign against Indian childbearing through involuntary sterilization.

                Published by University of Arizona Press

https://uapress.arizona.edu/book/children-of-the-dragonfly

  • First Nations; Residential School; Traditional Stories; Boarding Schools; Child Welfare; Social Services

 

The Mush Hole:  Life at Two Indian Residential Schools, paper ed (1997)

Elizabeth Graham

The Mush Hole: Life at Two Indian Residential Schools is the 500-plus page compilation of primary source documents about the residential schools, Mohawk Institute and the Mount Elgin Residential Schools in Ontario. Anthropologist Elizabeth Graham worked for years compiling the documentation about the administration of the schools from the original writings of the ministers and staff of both schools, and the government records relating to individual students attending the schools. In addition to the historical records the author allows 60 voices from individual students to speak their truth about their experiences at residential school. The author allows her limited voice to set the stage about the original intent and purpose of the residential school system. The final section of the book allows the students to have the last words through the interviews. The value of this work is the copious amount of detail provided. The work includes black and white photographs, a bibliography, and extensive indexing identifying topics and most importantly the names of students and administrative staff. Highly recommended for families of survivors and those interested in learning from original sources.

Published by Heffle Publishing

http://www.goodminds.com/mush-hole-life-two-indian-residential-schools-paper-ed

  • Iroquois; Mohawk; Multiple Nations; Ojbwe; Residential School

Indigenous History, Culture, & Contemporary Topics

 

Will I See? (2017)

David Alexander Robertson

Illustrated by GMB Chomichuk

May, a young teenage girl, traverses the city streets, finding keepsakes in different places along her journey. When May and her Kookum make these keepsakes into a necklace, it opens a world of danger and fantasy. While May fights against a terrible reality, she learns that there is strength in the spirit of those that have passed. But will that strength be able to save her? A story of tragedy and beauty, Will I See illuminates the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Published By Portage and Main Press

David A. Robertson

  • Graphic Novels; Indigenous Literature Society; Social Activism; Global Studies; MMIW; MMIWG2S

 

Born With A Tooth (2013)  

Joseph Boyden

Before internationally acclaimed author Joseph Boyden penned his bestselling novel Three Day Road and his Scotiabank Giller Prize–winning novel, Through Black Spruce, he published a powerful collection of thirteen stories about modern Aboriginal life that made readers and reviewers take notice. These stories of love, loss, rage and resilience match virtuosic style with clever wit to turn stereotypes on their head and reveal the traditions and grace of our First Peoples. Readers come to know a butterfly-costumed boy fascinated by the world of professional wrestling, a young woman who falls in love with a wolf, to the leader of an all-girl Native punk band and Painted Tongue, the unforgettable character from Through Black Spruce. Though each story is told in a different and distinct voice, they are all united by their captivating vitality, nuanced perceptions and vigorous prose.

Published By Penguin Random House

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/392352/born-with-a-tooth-by-joseph-boyden/9780143188018/

  • Fiction; Aboriginal Life; Loss; Rage; Resilience: Punk Rock

 

Manitowapow:  Aboriginal Writings From the Land of Water (2012)

Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair

This anthology of Aboriginal writings from Manitoba takes readers back through the millennia and forward to the present day, painting a dynamic picture of a territory interconnected through words, ideas, and experiences. A rich collection of stories, poetry, nonfiction, and speeches, it features: Historical writings, from important figures. Vibrant literary writing by eminent Aboriginal writers. Nonfiction and political writing from contemporary Aboriginal leaders. Local storytellers and keepers of knowledge from far-reaching Manitoba communities. New, vibrant voices that express the modern Aboriginal experiences. Anishinaabe, Cree, Dene, Inuit, Métis, and Sioux writers from Manitoba. Created in the spirit of the Anishinaabe concept debwe (to speak the truth), The Debwe Series is a collection of exceptional Aboriginal writing from across Canada. Manitowapow, a one-of-a-kind anthology, is the first book in The Debwe Series. Manitowapow is the traditional name that became Manitoba, a word that describes the sounds of beauty and power that created the province.

Published By Highwater Press

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/manitowapow/

  • Indigenous; Indigenous Writers; Stories; Poetry; Nonfiction; Speeches; Storytellers; Anishinaabe Writers; Cree Writers; Dene Writers; Inuit Writers; Métis Writers; , and Sioux writers ; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples; Debwe Series

 

Come Walk With Me:  A Memoir (2009)

Beatrice Mosionier

In 1983, the book In Search of April Raintree was published to great acclaim, heralding the voice of an important new writer, Beatrice Mosionier (then Culleton). With honesty and clarity, Mosionier explored the story of two Métis sisters as they struggle with loss, identity, and racism. Yet readers have long asked: how much of April’s story comes from the author’s own life? Come Walk With Me, Beatrice’s answer to that question, is a moving memoir that follows a bewildered three-year-old through a dramatic journey to adulthood. Recounting a life that, at times, parallels that of her most memorable fictional character, and at others, diverges from it, Mosionier searches to make sense of her losses―her sundered family, her innocence, and her dignity―only to triumph as a woman and writer, fulfilled artistically, politically, and personally.

Published by Portage and Main Press

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/come-walk-with-me/

  • Memoirs; Métis; Loss; Identity; racism;

 

Trail of the Spirit:  The Mysteries of Medicine Power Revealed (2003)

George Blondin

In this new collection of stories, Dene Elder George Blondin defines medicine power, a gift from the Creator for the Dene way of life. Although medicine power has existed since before time began, here Blondin focuses on the past two hundred years, to show how it has shaped the Dene culture.

Some are lucky enough to be born with, and the medicine power that some receive after birth or are taught by other medicine power people. This collection of stories and examples of Dene individuals who lived throughout history shows that there is a danger of losing the longstanding tradition of medicine power. Although this power can be used for both creation and destruction, it must be preserved as a vital element of the Dene way of life.

In The Mysteries of Medicine Power Revealed, Blondin is our storyteller—bringing medicine power to life with true stories from Dene history. Blondin explains medicine power clearly, and brings a better understanding of this extraordinary phenomenon into the world. Includes a foreword by Richard Van Camp.

Published By NeWest Press

https://newestpress.com/books/trail-of-the-spirit

  • Native Studies; Dene; Elder; Culture; Medicine; Indigenous Studies, Traditional Practices; History

 

Native Poetry in Canada:  A Contemporary Anthology (2001)

Jeannette Armstrong & Lally Grauer

Native Poetry in Canada: A Contemporary Anthology is the only collection of its kind. It brings together the poetry of many authors whose work has not previously been published in book form alongside that of critically-acclaimed poets, thus offering a record of Native cultural revival as it emerged through poetry from the 1960s to the present. The poets included here adapt English oratory and, above all, a sense of play. Native Poetry in Canada suggests both a history of struggle to be heard and the wealth of Native cultures in Canada today.

Published By Broadview Press

https://broadviewpress.com/product/native-poetry-in-canada/#tab-description

  • Poetry; Anthology; Indigenous; Native American; Indigenous Peoples; Native Cultural Revival

 

Only Drunks and Children Tell the Truth (1998)

Drew Hayden Taylor

A sequel to SOMEDAY, this is the emotional story of a woman’s struggle to acknowledge her birth family. Grace, a Native girl adopted by a White family, is asked by her birth sister to return to the Reserve for their mother’s funeral. Afraid of opening old wounds, Grace must find a place where the culture of her past can feed the truth of her present. Cast of 2 women and 2 men.

Published By Talon Press

http://www.drewhaydentaylor.com/books/only-drunks-and-children-tell-the-truth/

  • Play; Addiction; Adoption; Reserves; Identity; Community; Family

 

Stones and Switches (1995)

Lorne Simon

Stones and Switches takes the reader into the world of the Micmacs during the depression era – a world where beautiful legends and terrible spiritual powers meet; a world where a hard-working people struggle against poverty, racism and lethal epidemics; a world where one sensitive, young man, caught by events, questions the idea of free will and is tempted to do something – even something wrong – in order to assert his will.

Published by Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Media/Files/Stones-Part-One

  • Reader; First Nations; Spirituality; Poverty; Racism

 

Opening the Sky (1994)

Armand Ruffo

Opening in the Sky is Armand Ruffo’s first collection of poetry. Drawing from his Ojibway heritage, the author explores identity, alienation, liberation, love and loss. His poems examine the violence against the Native peoples and the land. Black-and-white illustrations by Leo Yerxa are also featured in the book.

Published By Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/Opening-In-The-Sky

  • Poetry; Indigenous Canadian Poet; Activist; First Nations Literature

Someday (1993)

Drew Hayden Taylor

The story in SOMEDAY, though told through fictional characters and full of Taylor’s distinctive wit and humour, is based on the real-life tragedies suffered by many Native Canadian families. Anne Wabung’s daughter was taken away by children’s aid workers when the girl was only a toddler. It is Christmastime 35 years later, and Anne’s yearning to see her now-grown daughter is stronger than ever. When the family is finally reunited, however, the dreams of neither women are fulfilled. The setting for the play is a fictional Ojibway community, but could be any reserve in Canada, where thousands of Native children were removed from their families in what is known among Native people as the “scoop-up” of the 1950s and 1960s. SOMEDAY is an entertaining, humourous, and spirited play that packs an intense emotional wallop.

Published By Fifth House

http://www.drewhaydentaylor.com/books/someday/

  • Play; Addiction; Adoption; Reserves; Identity; Community; Family

 

The Rez Sisters (1992)

Tomson Highway

This award-winning play by Native playwright Tomson Highway is a powerful and moving portrayal of seven women from a reserve attempting to beat the odds by winning at bingo. And not just any bingo. It is THE BIGGEST BINGO IN THE WORLD and a chance to win a way out of a tortured life. 

The Rez Sisters is hilarious, shocking, mystical and powerful, and clearly establishes the creative voice of Native theatre and writing in Canada today.

https://www.fifthhousepublishers.ca/Detail/092007944X

  • Play; Literature Reserves; Tragedy; Comedy; Hope

Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing (1989)

Tomson Highway

Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing tells another story of the mythical Wasaychigan Hill Indian Reserve, also the setting for Tomson Highway’s award winning play The Rez Sisters. Wherein The Rez Sisters the focus was on seven Wasy” women and the game of bingo, Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasingfeatures seven “Wasy” men and the game of hockey. It is a fast-paced story of tragedy, comedy, and hope.

Published By Fifth House

https://www.fifthhousepublishers.ca/Detail/1897252838

Play; Literature Reserves; Tragedy; Comedy; Hope

Resources

Reconciliation and Residential Schools

 

Mixed Blessings:  Indigenous Encounters with Christianity in Canada (2017)

Tolly Bradford and Chelsea Horton

Mixed Blessings transforms our understanding of the relationship between Indigenous people and Christianity in Canada from the early 1600s to the present day. While acknowledging the harm of colonialism, including the trauma inflicted by church-run residential schools, this interdisciplinary collection challenges the portrayal of Indigenous people as passive victims of malevolent missionaries who experienced a uniformly dark history. Instead, this book illuminates the diverse and multifaceted ways that Indigenous communities and individuals – including prominent leaders such as Louis Riel and Edward Ahenakew – have interacted, and continue to interact, meaningfully with Christianity.

Published by UBC Press

https://www.ubcpress.ca/mixed-blessings

  • Anthropology; Canadian Regions; History; Indigenous Studies; Religion

 

Truth and Indignation:  Canada’s Truth and reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools, Second Edition (2017)

Ronald Niezen

The original edition of Truth and Indignation offered the first close and critical assessment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) as it was unfolding. Niezen used testimonies, texts, and visual materials produced by the Commission as well as interviews with survivors, priests, and nuns to raise important questions about the TRC process. He asked what the TRC meant for reconciliation, transitional justice, and conceptions of traumatic memory.

In this updated edition, Niezen discusses the Final Report and Calls to Action bringing the book up to date and making it a valuable text for teaching about transitional justice, colonialism and redress, public anthropology, and human rights. Thoughtful, provocative, and uncompromising in the need to tell the “truth” as he sees it, Niezen offers an important contribution to understanding truth and reconciliation processes in general, and the Canadian experience in particular.

Published by University of Toronto Press

https://utorontopress.com/ca/truth-and-indignation-second-edition-1

  • Anthropology; Ethnographies Case Studies; Indigenous Studies; Social Cultural Anthropology; Indigenous History

Arts of Engagement:  Taking Aesthetic Action In and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (2016)

Dylan Robinson eds & Keavy Martin eds.

Arts of Engagement focuses on the role that music, film, visual art, and Indigenous cultural practices play in and beyond Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools. Contributors here examine the impact of aesthetic and sensory experience in residential school history, at TRC national and community events, and in artwork and exhibitions not affiliated with the TRC. Using the framework of “aesthetic action,” the essays expand the frame of aesthetics to include visual, aural, and kinetic sensory experience, and question the ways in which key components of reconciliation such as apology and witnessing have social and political effects for residential school survivors, intergenerational survivors, and settler publics.

This volume makes an important contribution to the discourse on reconciliation in Canada by examining how aesthetic and sensory interventions offer alternative forms of political action and healing. These forms of aesthetic action encompass both sensory appeals to empathize and invitations to join together in alliance and new relationships as well as refusals to follow the normative scripts of reconciliation. Such refusals are important in their assertion of new terms for conciliation, terms that resist the imperatives of reconciliation as a form of resolution.

This collection charts new ground by detailing the aesthetic grammars of reconciliation and conciliation. The authors document the efficacies of the TRC for the various Indigenous and settler publics it has addressed, and consider the future aesthetic actions that must be taken in order to move beyond what many have identified as the TRC’s political limitations.

Published by Wilfrid Laurier University Press

https://www.wlupress.wlu.ca/Books/A/Arts-of-Engagement

  • Performing Arts; Art; Indigenous Studies

 

The Cultural Sociology of Anglican Mission and the Indian Residential Schools in Canada (2016)

Eric Taylor Woods

This book focuses on the recurring struggle over the meaning of the Anglican Church’s role in the Indian residential schools–a long-running school system designed to assimilate Indigenous children into Euro-Canadian culture, in which sexual, psychological, and physical abuse were common. From the end of the nineteenth century until the outset of twenty-first century, the meaning of the Indian residential schools underwent a protracted transformation. Once a symbol of the Church’s sacred mission to Christianize and civilize Indigenous children, they are now associated with colonialism and suffering. In bringing this transformation to light, the book addresses why the Church was so quick to become involved in the Indian residential schools and why acknowledgment of their deleterious impact was so protracted. In doing so, the book adds to our understanding of the sociological process by which perpetrators come to recognize themselves as such.

Published By Palgrave Macmillan

https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9781137486707

  • Anglican Church; Residential Schools; Prejudice; Social Science; Discrimination; Race Relations; residential Schools; First Nations; TRC; Canadian History; Aboriginal History; Indigenous Peoples

 

Tears in the Grass (2016)

Lynda Archer

At ninety years of age, Elinor, a Saskatchewan Cree artist, inveterate roll-your-own smoker, and talker to rivers and stuffed bison, sets out to find something that was stolen almost a lifetime ago. With what little time she has left, she is determined to find the child taken from her when she, only a child herself, survived a rape at a residential school.

Published by Dundurn Publishers of Fine Books

https://www.dundurn.com/books/Tears-Grass

  • Saskatchewan; Traditional life; Residential Schools; Fiction

 

UNeducation, Vol1:  A Residential School Graphoc Novel (Uncut) (2016)

Jason Eaglespeaker

This UNcut version contains an extra chapter, “The Cycle”, adult supervision recommended** The chilling chronicles of a Native family’s government-sanctioned exploitation in the North American residential/boarding school systems. What began as a grassroots fundraiser, “UNeducation, Vol 1: A Residential School Graphic Novel” is now used in school curriculum, university syllabus’, treatment/corrections centre resources, healing initiatives, government agencies and educational trainings worldwide. Now available to the public, in ebook form, for the first time. Gain a full and proper education about a dark episode in North American history.

Published By CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=22755169061

  • First Nations, Residential Schools; TRC; Government Sanctioned Exploitation; Relationships, Treatment; Corrections; Indigenous World Views; Culture and Identity: State Violence; Land; Law and Treaties

 

What We Learned:  Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools (2016)

Helen Raptis with members of the Tsimshian Nation

The legacy of residential schools has haunted Canadians, yet little is known about the day and public schools where most Indigenous children were sent to be educated. In What We Learned, two generations of Tsimshian students – elders born in the 1930s and 1940s and middle-aged adults born in the 1950s and 1960s – add their recollections of attending day schools in northwestern British Columbia to contemporary discussions of Indigenous schooling in Canada. Their stories also invite readers to consider traditional Indigenous views of education that conceive of learning as a lifelong experience that takes place across multiple contexts.

Published by UBC Press

https://www.ubcpress.ca/what-we-learned

  • Indian Day Schools; Church; Government; Abuse; Tsimshian Education; Traditional Education; Culture; Language; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies; History

 

A Knock on the Door: The Essential History of Residential Schools for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Edited and Abridged (2015)

Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Forward Phil Fontaine

Afterword Aimée Craft

“It can start with a knock on the door one morning. It is the local Indian agent, or the parish priest, or, perhaps, a Mounted Police officer.” So began the school experience of many Indigenous children in Canada for more than a hundred years, and so begins the history of residential schools prepared by the Truth & Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). Between 2008 and 2015, the TRC provided opportunities for individuals, families, and communities to share their experiences of residential schools and released several reports based on 7000 survivor statements and five million documents from government, churches, and schools, as well as a solid grounding in secondary sources.

A Knock on the Door, published in collaboration with the National Research Centre for Truth & Reconciliation, gathers material from the several reports the TRC has produced to present the essential history and legacy of residential schools in a concise and accessible package that includes new materials to help inform and contextualize the journey to reconciliation that Canadians are now embarked upon.

Survivor and former National Chief of the Assembly First Nations, Phil Fontaine, provides a Foreword, and an Afterword introduces the holdings and opportunities of the National Centre for Truth & Reconciliation, home to the archive of recordings, and documents collected by the TRC. 

As Aimée Craft writes in the Afterword, knowing the historical backdrop of residential schooling and its legacy is essential to the work of reconciliation. In the past, agents of the Canadian state knocked on the doors of Indigenous families to take the children to school. Now, the Survivors have shared their truths and knocked back. It is time for Canadians to open the door to mutual understanding, respect, and reconciliation.

Published By University of Manitoba Press

https://uofmpress.ca/books/detail/a-knock-on-the-door

  • Residential Schools; TRC; Healing; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Reconciliation

 

Canada’s Residential Schools:  Missing Children and Unmarked Burials:  The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 4 (2015)

Truth and reconciliation Commission

This volume contains a statistical analysis, operational policies and custodial care, and information about where the children were buried during their time in residential school. It also provide background information about schools tat were destroyed by fire between 1867 to 1997.

http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/Reports/Volume_4_Missing_Children_English_Web.pdf

  • Residential Schools, TRC; History; Reconciliation

 

Canada’s Residential Schools :  The History, Part 1Orgins to 1939:  The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 1 (2015)

Truth and reconciliation Commission

This volume contains statements from the TRC Chair Justice Murray Sinclair, Commissioner Dr. Marie Wilson, and Commissioner Chief Wilton Littlechild. This volume also provides a historical context for Canada’s residential schools and a historical analysis of the he Canadian residential school system between 1867 to 1939.

https://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/Reports/Volume_1_History_Part_1_English_Web.pdf

  • Residential Schools, TRC; History; Reconciliation

Canada’s Residential Schools:  The Inuit and Northern Experience:  The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 2 (2015)

Truth and reconciliation Commission

This volume contains information about the mission schools in the North between 1876 to 1960 and how schools changed after the 1950 when bureaucrats replaced the missionaries

http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/Reports/Volume_2_Inuit_and_Northern_English_Web.pdf

  • Residential Schools, TRC; History; Reconciliation

 

Canada’s Residential Schools:  The Legacy:  The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 5 (2015)

Truth and reconciliation Commission

This volume describes what Canada must do to overcome the schools’ tragic legacy and move towards reconciliation with the country’s first peoples.

http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/Reports/Volume_5_Legacy_English_Web.pdf

  • Residential Schools, TRC; History; Reconciliation

 

Canada’s Residential Schools:  The Métis Experience:  The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 3 (2015)

Truth and reconciliation Commission

This volume contains information about the Métis experience in residential schools between 1883-1960 and the Calls to Action to move towards reconciliation.

http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/Reports/Volume_3_Metis_English_Web.pdf

  • Residential Schools, TRC; History; Reconciliation

 

Children of the Broken Treaty:  Canada’s Lost Promise and One Girl’s Dream (2015)

Charlie Angus

Children of the Broken Treaty exposes a system of apartheid in Canada that led to the largest youth-driven human rights movement in the country’s history. The movement was inspired by Shannen Koostachin, a young Cree woman whom George Stroumboulopoulos named as one of “five teenage girls who kicked ass in history.”

All Shannen wanted was a decent education. She found an ally in Charlie Angus, who had no idea she was going to change his life and inspire others to change the country.

Based on extensive documentation assembled from Freedom of Information requests, Angus establishes a dark, unbroken line that extends from the policies of John A. Macdonald to the government of today. He provides chilling insight into how Canada–through breaches of treaties, broken promises, and callous neglect–deliberately denied First Nations children their basic human rights.

Published By University of Regina Press

https://uofrpress.ca/Books/C/Children-of-the-Broken-Treaty2

  • Human Rights; Indigenous Peoples: Indigenous Education; Indian Act Residential Schools

 

The Education of Augie Merasty:  A Residential School Memoir ( The Regina Collection (2015)

Joseph A. Joseph & Davis Carpenter

This memoir offers a courageous and intimate chronicle of life in a residential school. 

Now a retired fisherman and trapper, the author was one of an estimated 150,000 First Nations, Inuit, and Metis children who were taken from their families and sent to government-funded, church-run schools, where they were subjected to a policy of “aggressive assimilation.”

As Augie Merasty recounts, these schools did more than attempt to mold children in the ways of white society. They were taught to be ashamed of their native heritage and, as he experienced, often suffered physical and sexual abuse. 

But, even as he looks back on this painful part of his childhood, Merasty’s sense of humour and warm voice shine through.

Published by University of Regina Press

https://uofrpress.ca/Books/T/The-Education-of-Augie-Merasty

  • Memoirs; Abuse; Sexual Abuse; Trap line; Métis; First Nations; Inuit; Reconciliation; Residential Schools; Elders

 

Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future:  Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (2015)

Truth and Reconciliation Commission

This report provides a summary of the activities, history and legacy of the TRC and the challenges moving towards reconciliation.

Published by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Exec_Summary_2015_05_31_web_o.pdf

  • TRC; Residential School; Reconciliation

Shattered Spirits in the Land of the Little Sticks:  Contextualizing te Impact of Residential School Among the Woodland Cree (2015)

Herman J. Michell, PhD

Shattered Spirits in the Land of the Little Sticks traces the impacts of Residential school experiences within the life of a male survivor of Woodland Cree heritage. Chapter 1 is a biographical and cultural snapshot of Dr. Michell’s personal childhood reflections and experiences ‘out on the northern landscape’ before Residential school. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of Residential schools against the backdrop of colonization in Canada. Chapter 3 and 4 are focused on Guy Hill Residential School and Dr. Michell’s experiences in this institution. Chapter 5 describes the impact of Residential school abuse at the individual level in the following four dimensions: physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional. Chapter 6 represents the lasting impact of Residential school abuse at the family and community levels.As Dr. Michell astutely notes, in Residential school, we were taught not to question, critique, or talk too much. We learned to stay silent. And we stayed silent for many generations. The time has come to move beyond this silence, disclose our hurts, grieve over our losses, heal from the pain, and embrace life.

Published By J. Charlton Publishing

https://www.jcharltonpublishing.com/product/shattered-spirits-in-the-land-of-the-little-sticks-contextualizing-the-impact-of-residential-school-among-the-woodland-cree/

  • Residential School; Indigenous Resistance; Decolonization; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies; Canadian History

This Benevolent Experiment: Indigenous Boarding Schools, Genocide, and Redress in Canada and the United States (2015)

Andrew John Woolford

At the end of the nineteenth century, Indigenous boarding schools were touted as the means for solving the “Indian problem” in both Canada and the United States. With the goal of permanently transforming Indigenous young people into Europeanized colonial subjects, the schools were ultimately a means for eliminating Indigenous communities as obstacles to land acquisition, resource extraction, and nation building. Andrew Woolford analyzes the formulation of the “Indian problem” as a policy concern in the United States and Canada and examines how the “solution” of Indigenous boarding schools was implemented in Manitoba and New Mexico through complex chains that included multiple government offices, a variety of staff, Indigenous peoples, and even nonhuman factors such as poverty, disease, and space. The genocidal project inherent in these boarding schools, however, did not unfold in either nation without diversion, resistance, and unintended consequences.

Because of differing historical, political, and structural influences, the two countries have arrived at two very different responses to the harms caused by assimilative education. Inspired by the signing of the 2006 Residential School Settlement Agreement in Canada, which provided a truth and reconciliation commission and compensation for survivors of residential schools, This Benevolent Experiment offers a multi-layered, comparative analysis of Indigenous boarding schools in the United States and Canada.

Published By The University of Manitoba Press

* Finalist, Raphael Lemkin Book Award, The Institute for the Study of Genocide (2017);Outstanding Academic Title, Choice Magazine (2016); NOMINEE, Alexander Kennedy Isbister Award for Non-Fiction, Manitoba Book Awards (2016)

https://uofmpress.ca/books/detail/this-benevolent-experiment

  • Land Acquisition; Land Dispossession; Resource Extraction; Boarding Schools; Residential Schools; Prejudice; Social Science; Discrimination; Race Relations; residential Schools; First Nations; TRC; Canadian History; Aboriginal History; Indigenous Peoples

 

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada:  Calls to Action (2015)

Truth and reconciliation Commission

This volume provides the Calls to Action resulting from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf

  • Residential Schools, TRC; History; Reconciliation

 

Wake the Stone Man (2015)

Carol McDougall

Set in a small northern town, under the mythical shadow of the Sleeping Giant, Wake the Stone Man follows the complicated friendship of two girls coming of age in the 1960s. Molly meets Nakina, who is Ojibwe and a survivor of the residential school system, in high school, and they form a strong friendship. As the bond between them grows, Molly, who is not native, finds herself a silent witness to the racism and abuse her friend must face each day.

In this time of political awakening, Molly turns to her camera to try to make sense of the intolerance she sees in the world around her. Her photos become a way to freeze time and observe the complex human politics of her hometown. Her search for understanding uncovers some hard truths about Nakina’s past and leaves Molly with a growing sense of guilt over her own silence.

When personal tragedy tears them apart, Molly must travel a long hard road in search of forgiveness and friendship.

https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/wake-the-stone-man

  • Fiction; Activism; Ojibwe; Residential School

 

What We Have Learned: Principles of Reconciliation (2015)

Truth and reconciliation Commission

This volume describes the history of residential schools, the legacy, and principles to achieve reconciliation.

http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Principles_2015_05_31_web_o.pdf

  • Residential Schools, TRC; History; Reconciliation

 

Full Circle:  The Unfinished Work of Hope, Healing &Reconciliation- The Aboriginal Healing Foundation (2014)

Wayne K. Spear

The document provides a background about the Aboriginal Healing Foundation and a way forward towards reconciliation.

Published By the Aboriginal Healing Foundation

http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/full-circle-2.pdf

  • Residential Schools; Reconciliation; Federal Government; Residential School Survivors

 

Indian School Road (2014)

Chris Benjamin

In Indian School Road, journalist Chris Benjamin tackles the controversial and tragic history of the Shubenacadie Indian Residential School, its predecessors, and its lasting effects, giving voice to multiple perspectives for the first time. Benjamin integrates research, interviews, and testimonies to guide readers through the varied experiences of students, principals, and teachers over the school’s nearly forty years of operation (1930-1967) and beyond. Exposing the raw wounds of Truth and Reconciliation as well as the struggle for an inclusive Mi’kmaw education system, Indian School Road is a comprehensive and compassionate narrative history of the school that uneducated hundreds of Aboriginal children.

Published By Nimbus Publishing

https://www.nimbus.ca/store/indian-school-road.html?___SID=U

  • Mi’kmaq; Aboriginal; Heritage

 

Origins of Lateral Violence in Aboriginal Communities:  A Preliminary Study of Student Abuse in Residential Schools (2014)

Aboriginal Healing Foundation

This Report Explores abuse that happened between students attending residential school

Published By The Aboriginal Healing Foundation

http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/lateral-violence-english.pdf

  • Residential School; Abuse; Lateral Violence

 

Residential Schools, With Words and Images of Survivors, A National History Now Available (2014)

Larry Loyie, Constance Brissenden & Wayne K. Spear

Residential Schools, With the Words and Images of Survivors, A National History honours the survivors, the former students, who attended residential schools. Designed for the general reader this accessible, 112-page history offers a first-person perspective of the residential school system in Canada, as it shares the memories of more than 70 survivors from across Canada as well as 125 archival and contemporary images (65 black & white photographs, 51 colour, some never before published). This essential volume written by award-winning author Larry Loyie, 1933-2016 (Cree), a survivor of St. Bernard Mission residential school in Grouard, AB, and co-authored by Constance Brissenden and Wayne K. Spear (Mohawk), reflects the ongoing commitment of this team to express the truths about residential school experiences and to honour the survivors whose voices are shared in this book. Along with the voices, readers will be engaged by the evocative, archival photographs provided by the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre with the assistance of curator Krista McCracken. The book begins with the moving introduction by Larry Loyie, and moves to seven chapters that explore the purpose of this school system; cultures and traditions; leaving home; life at school the half-day system; the dark side of the schools; friendship and laughter coping with a new life; changing world–the healing begins; and an afterword. A detailed, full colour map showing residential schools, timeline with key dates, glossary, and a helpful index (including names of survivors and schools) make this vital resource a must-have for secondary, college, and universities, libraries, and the general reader.

Published By Indigenous Education Press
*2016 Winner of Golden Oak award in Ontario’s Forest of Reading program

http://www.goodminds.com/residential-schools-words-and-images-survivors-national-history-now-available

  • Education; History; Literacy; NAC10; NAC20; History 8; 2015 FNCR; Worldview; NDA3M; Residential Schools

 

The Survivors Speak:  A Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (2014)

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission

In this volume, residential school Survivors speak of their pain, loneliness, and suffering, and of their accomplishments. While this is a difficult story, it is also a story of courage and endurance. The first step in any process of national reconciliation requires us all to attend to these voices, which have been silenced for far too long. We encourage all Canadians to do so.

Published By The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Survivors_Speak_2015_05_30_web_o.pdf

  • Native Peoples; Canada; Residential Schools; Social Conditions; Government Relations; TRC

 

Conversations With a Dead Man:  The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott (2013)

Mark Abley

“Mark Abley has undertaken a daunting task: reconciling the Duncan Campbell Scott whose pen inscribed the cultures of Canada’s First Nations in justly celebrated verse, and the same Duncan Campbell Scott who, as the overseer of residential schools and head of Indian Affairs, attempted to erase those same cultures from the pages of history. Abley, a fine poet himself, turns Scott, the bogeyman, into a man of flesh-and-blood, by—in a fine twist—making him into a revenant to be grappled with in regular visitations. The conceit works admirably. Reading Conversations with a Dead Man, I felt as if I had been waylaid, not by a dour Ottawa bureaucrat, by an Ancient Mariner with the most urgent of tales to tell.” —Taras Grescoe, author of Bottomfeeder and Straphanger

“As Canadian biography deepens as a form, it will need books as intrepid, incisive, and compassionate, as this one, and before long Conversations with a Dead Man may be seen as pioneering.” —Charles Foran, author of Mordecai

As a poet and citizen deeply concerned by the Oka Crisis, the Idle No More protests and Canada’s ongoing failure to resolve First Nations issues, Montreal author Mark Abley has long been haunted by the figure of Duncan Campbell Scott, known both as the architect of Canada’s most destructive Aboriginal policies and as one of the nation’s major poets. Who was this enigmatic figure who could compose a sonnet to an “Onondaga Madonna” one moment and promote a “final solution” to the “Indian problem” the next? In this passionate, intelligent and highly readable enquiry into the state of Canada’s troubled Aboriginal relations, Abley alternates between analysis of current events and an imagined debate with the spirit of Duncan Campbell Scott, whose defence of the Indian Residential School and belief in assimilation illuminate the historical roots underlying today’s First Nations’ struggles.

Published By Douglas& McIntyre

http://www.douglas-mcintyre.com/book/conversations-with-a-dead-man

  • Biography; Autobiography; Residential Schools; Historical; Colonization

 

Disinherited Generations:  Our struggle to Reclaim Treaty Rights for First Nations Women and Their Decedents (2013)

Nellie Carlson and Kathleen Steihauer

This oral autobiography of two remarkable Cree women tells their life stories against a backdrop of government discrimination, First Nations activism, and the resurgence of First Nations communities. Nellie Carlson and Kathleen Steinhauer, who helped to organize the Indian Rights for Indian Women movement in western Canada in the 1960s, fought the Canadian government’s interpretation of treaty and Aboriginal rights, the Indian Act, and the male power structure in their own communities in pursuit of equal rights for Aboriginal women and children. After decades of activism and court battles, First Nations women succeeded in changing these oppressive regulations, thus benefitting thousands of their descendants. Those interested in human rights, activism, history, and Native Studies will find that these personal stories, enriched by detailed notes and photographs, form a passionate record of an important, continuing struggle.

Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/79-9780888646422-disinherited-generations

  • Native Studies; Human Rights; Women’s Studies; Oral History 
    Political Studies; Native Studies; Women’s Studies; Social Science; Ethnic Studies; Native American Studies,; Indigenous Studies; Political Science 

 

Dancing, Singing, Painting, and Speaking the Healing Story:  Healing through Creative Arts (2012)

Aboriginal Healing Foundation

Linda Archibald, Jonathan Dewar, Carrie Reid & Vanessa Stevens

This publication explores Indigenous and Western approaches to art and healing.  Some of the topics covered include Personal development, holistic healing, building relationships, traditional healers, the rights of restoration, and many other interesting topics

http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/healing-through-creative-arts.pdf

  • Race Relations; residential Schools; First Nations; TRC; Canadian History; Aboriginal History; Indigenous Peoples; Healing

 

Indian Horse (2012)

Richard Wagamese

Saul Indian Horse is dying. Tucked away in a hospice high above the clash and clang of a big city, he embarks on a marvellous journey of imagination back through the life he led as a northern Ojibway, with all its sorrows and joys.

With compassion and insight, author Richard Wagamese traces through his fictional characters the decline of a culture and a cultural way. For Saul, taken forcibly from the land and his family when he’s sent to residential school, salvation comes for a while through his incredible gifts as a hockey player. But in the harsh realities of 1960s Canada, he battles obdurate racism and the spirit-destroying effects of cultural alienation and displacement.

Indian Horse unfolds against the bleak loveliness of northern Ontario, all rock, marsh, bog and cedar. Wagamese writes with a spare beauty, penetrating the heart of a remarkable Ojibway man. 

Published By Douglas & MaIntyre

* Winner of the Canada Reads People’s Choice award and the First Nations Communities Reads program; Short-listed for the International IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award; 2012 Globe and Mail top 100 Book of the Year

https://www.amazon.ca/Indian-Horse-Richard-Wagamese/dp/1553654021

  • Fiction; Imagination; Northern Ojibway; Culture; Identity; Residential School; Hockey; Ontario

 

They Came for the Children (2012)

Truth and Reconciliation Commission

A TRC publication that provides an overview about Canada’s Residential Schools including stories from Residential School Survivors.

Published by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/2039_T&R_eng_web[1].pdf

  • Residential Schools; Residential School Survivors; Canadian History; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies; Racism

 

Wawahte:  Subject:  Canadian Indian Residential Schools (2012)

Robert P. Wells

Indian Residential School Survivors Society British Columbia, Canada For all the people who read this book may they be forever enlightened. By shining the light on a dark part of our past we have a chance to create a bright new day for aboriginals and all Canadians. We will all know what happened and then come to realize that what happens now and our vision for a future together is what really counts. Together we will stand for what is right and the intention of Indian residential schools and colonization will not happen again! With Deep Respect, Chief bert Joseph, Executive Director

Published By Friesen Press

https://books.friesenpress.com/store/title/119734000027704210/Robert-P.-Wells-Wawahte

  • Biography; Autobiography; Cultural Heritage; Family; relationships; Prejudice; Social Science; Discrimination; Race Relations; residential Schools; First Nations; TRC; Canadian History; Aboriginal History; Indigenous Peoples

 

The Role of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police During The Indian Residential School System (2011)

Marcel- Eugène LeBeuf, Ph.D on behalf of the RCMP

This government publication provides a historical overview about the involvement by the RCMP with Residential Schools in Canada

Published By Government of Canada

http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/grc-rcmp/PS64-71-2009-eng.pdf

  • Indigenous; Residential Schools; RCMP; Relationships; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples

 

They Called Me Number One (2011)

Bev Stellers

They Called Me Number One (Third Prize winner) 
Like thousands of Aboriginal children in Canada, and elsewhere in the colonized world, Xatsu’ll chief Bev Sellars spent part of her childhood as a student in a church-run residential school.

These institutions endeavored to civilize” Native children through Christian teachings; forced separation from family, language, and culture; and strict discipline. Perhaps the most symbolically potent strategy used to alienate residential school children was addressing them by assigned numbers only – not by the names with which they knew and understood themselves.

In this frank and poignant memoir of her years at St. Joseph’s Mission, Sellars breaks her silence about the residential school’s lasting effects on her and her family – from substance abuse to suicide attempts – and eloquently articulates her own path to healing. Number One comes at a time of recognition – by governments and society at large – that only through knowing the truth about these past injustices can we begin to redress them.

Published By Talon Books

* BC Book Prize, Non-Fiction; (Finalist)
Burt Award for First Nations, Metis, and Inuit Literature; (Third Prize winner) 

http://talonbooks.com/books/number-one

  • Memoirs; Residential School; Christian Teachings; Family; Language; Culture; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal History; Identity

 

Unsettling the Settler Within:  Indian Residential Schools, Truth Telling, and Reconcilation in Canada (2011)

Paulette Regan

Forward by Taiaiake Alfred

In 2008 the Canadian government apologized to the victims of the notorious Indian residential school system, and established a Truth and Reconciliation Commission whose goal was to mend the deep rifts between Aboriginal peoples and the settler society that engineered the system.

In Unsettling the Settler Within, Paulette Regan, a former residential-schools-claims manager, argues that in order to truly participate in the transformative possibilities of reconciliation, non-Aboriginal Canadians must undergo their own process of decolonization. They must relinquish the persistent myth of themselves as peacemakers and acknowledge the destructive legacy of a society that has stubbornly ignored and devalued Indigenous experience. With former students offering their stories as part of the truth and reconciliation processes, Regan advocates for an ethos that learns from the past, making space for an Indigenous historical counter-narrative to avoid perpetuating a colonial relationship between Aboriginal and settler peoples.

A powerful and compassionate call to action, Unsettling the Settler Within inspires with its thoughtful and personal account of Regan’s own journey, and offers all Canadians — Indigenous and non-Indigenous policymakers, politicians, teachers, and students — a new way of approaching the critical task of healing the wounds left by the residential school system.

A compassionate and powerful book that will appeal to both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal policymakers, politicians, educators, students, and any Canadian with an interest in building a future that both acknowledges and learns from the failures of the past.

Published By UBC Press

* 2012 Short-listed for the Canada Prize in Social Sciences, Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

https://www.ubcpress.ca/unsettling-the-settler-within

  • Canadian History; History; Indigenous Studies; Law; Law and Society

 

Where Mary Went (2010)

Lynne Sherry McLean

Mary Fisher has not had an easy life. Forced into a residential institute after the death of her mother, she and her siblings suffer appalling abuse and neglect. While many around her languish, Mary grows stronger. A precocious child, Mary matures into a resilient woman with a kind heart and quick smile that endears her to everyone she meets and two men in particular: Gmiwan, a sensitive artist whom she will one day marry, and Tom Dunsby, the mayor of Jackson, whose love can never be acknowledged. When Gmiwan goes off to war, Mary struggles to raise her young son alone during the Depression.

Spanning three decades, Where Mary Went is part one of an epic two-volume series.

Published By Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/Where-Mary-Went

  • Fiction; Residential Schools; Abuse; Neglect; Resiliency

 

Response, Responsibility, and Renewal: Canada’s Truth and Reconcilation Journey (2009)

Gregory Younging eds., Jonathan Dewar eds. & Mike Degagne eds

This publication provides collection of essays about residential schools, reconciliation, restitution, rhetoric, and how to move towards reconciliation

Published by the aboriginal Healing Foundation

http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/trc2.pdf

  • Residential Schools, TRC; History; Reconciliation

 

Where the Pavement Ends:  Canada’s Aboriginal Recovery Movement and the Urgent Need for Reconciliation (2009)

Marie Wadden

Over the past fifteen years, Canada’s Aboriginal healing community has emerged as a vital and visible force. Creative recovery programs have been established across the country, and international initiatives such as the “Healing Our Spirit Worldwide” gatherings have originated here. The Canadian government has thrown millions of dollars at the issue of addictions, yet alcoholism, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, drug abuse and gambling are epidemic today in the lives of Aboriginal people.

Where the Pavement Ends is filled with inspiring stories gathered from journalist Marie Wadden’s discussions with activists across Canada who are involved in the Aboriginal healing movement. But the book is also a passionate wake-up call aimed at all Canadians. Existing government policies, Wadden argues, perpetuate the problems that are tearing Aboriginal families and communities apart. We must make social healing in Aboriginal communities an immediate national priority. We must also demand public policy that guarantees First Nations, Inuit and Métis people the right to live as full and equal citizens. In these ways, we can offer true support to these marginalized communities.

Published by Douglas & McIntyre

http://www.douglas-mcintyre.com/book/where-the-pavement-ends-paperback

  • Healing; Residential schools; Interviews; Journalists; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies; Addictions; Public Policy

 

An Historic Non- Apology, Completely and Utterly Not Accepted (2008)

Roland Chrisjohn, Andrea Bear Nicholas; Karen Stote

James Craven (Omahkohkiaayo i’poyi), Tanya Wasacase; Pierre Loiselle

& Andrea O. Smith

A Group of residential survivors write a statement criticizing the Residential School Apology made by the Right Honourable Steven Harper, Former Prime Minister of Canada in 2008.

Published by Marxmail.org

http://www.marxmail.org/ApologyNotAccepted.htm

  • Residential School, Residential School Apology; Letter

 

From Truth to Reconciliation:  Transforming the Legacy of Residential Schools (2008)

Marlene Brant Castellano, Linda Archibald and Mike De Gagne

This book is divided into four sections that are intended to take the reader along a path of reconciliation. Each chapter is written by a different author and in different styles. The first section, Truth-Telling looks at Aboriginal history in Canada with a focus on residential schools. The second section, The legacy Lives On describes how past circumstances are being replicated today but in different ways. Section three, Exploring paths to Reconciliation, examines new and different ways that reconciliation can be initiated. Finally the books path comes to an end with section four, Journey of the Spirit. This final section looks at reconciling the painful personal experiences that Aboriginal peoples in Canada have had and finding away to heal the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and Canadian society. This is the first instalment of a three-volume set.

                Published by Aboriginal Healing Foundation

http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/from-truth-to-reconciliation-transforming-the-legacy-of-residential-schools.pdf

  • First Nations; Reconciliation; National; First Nations; Native Peoples; Historical; Canadian

 

Magic Weapons:  Aboriginal Writers Remaking Community after Residential School (2007)

Sam Mckegney

Forward by Basil Johnson

The legacy of the residential school system ripples throughout Native Canada, its fingerprints on the domestic violence, poverty, alcoholism, drug abuse, and suicide rates that continue to cripple many Native communities. Magic Weapons is the first major survey of Indigenous writings on the residential school system, and provides groundbreaking readings of life writings by Rita Joe (Mi’kmaq) and Anthony Apakark Thrasher (Inuit) as well as in-depth critical studies of better known life writings by Basil Johnston (Ojibway) and Tomson Highway (Cree). Magic Weapons examines the ways in which Indigenous survivors of residential school mobilize narrative in their struggles for personal and communal empowerment in the shadow of attempted cultural genocide. By treating Indigenous life-writings as carefully crafted aesthetic creations and interrogating their relationship to more overtly politicized historical discourses, Sam McKegney argues that Indigenous life-writings are culturally generative in ways that go beyond disclosure and recompense, re-envisioning what it means to live and write as Indigenous individuals in post-residential school Canada.

Published by University of Manitoba Press

* 2008 Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title

https://uofmpress.ca/books/detail/magic-weapons

  • Residential Schools; Native Canadian; Indigenous Peoples; Suicide; Literature; Indigenous Writers Residential School Survivors; Cultural Genocide

 

A Brief report of the Federal Government of Canada’s Residential School System for Inuit (2006)

Truth and Reconciliation Commission

This brief report summarizes the federal government’s involvement in the education system for the Inuit in Canada’s North. The information comes from a research study by David King undertaken for the Aboriginal Healing Foundation.

This report is based upon information from the archives of the federal departments of Northern Affairs and National Resources, and Health and Welfare Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Hudson’s Bay Company, and the Anglican and Roman Catholic churches. The research also includes interviews with former students, missionaries and government bureaucrats. The spread of sickness and disease, such as tuberculosis, in the residential schools is not discussed here, but many Inuit students were taken away from the schools to different hospitals across southern Canada.

Published by the Aboriginal Healing Foundation

http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/kingsummaryfweb.pdf

  • Residential Schools; Inuit; Canadian North; Indian and Northern Affairs; Welfare Canada; Churches; RCMP; Hudson’s Bay Company; Tuberculosis; Disease

 

The Circle Game: Shadows and Substance in the Indian Residential School Experience in Canada (2006)

Roland Chrisjohn

Was the residential school era a misguided feature of Canada’s generous humanitarian inclinations toward Aboriginal peoples? Were the notorious brutal acts of the operators of these schools the sporadic and isolated deeds of a few malign individuals? The authors of The Circle Game shout a resounding “No!” to these and related questions, arguing that existing accounts in various Canadian and Aboriginal media systematically obscure and misinform about the facts and their interpretation.

Published By Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/The-Circle-Game-Shadows-and-Substance-in-the-Indian-Residential-School-Experience-in-Canada

  • Residential School; Substance Abuse; Native Studies; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Native Studies

 

Métis History and Experience and Residential Schools in Canada:  The Aboriginal Healing Foundation Series (2006)

Larry N. Chartrand, Tricia Logan and Judy D. Daniels

This publication provides a comprehensive overview about Métis participation in Residential Schools that includes a historical background, overview of social policies and rationale used during this era, the impacts the schools had on the Métis nation, and conclusions and recommendation for future research.

Published by The Aboriginal Healing Foundation

http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/metiseweb.pdf

  • Métis; Residential Schools; Healing History; Indigenous Studies; Culture; gender; race; identity

 

Morningstar:  A Warrior’s Spirit (2006)

Morningstar Mercredi

Morningstar Mercredi wrote her memoir as a form of activism in response to the ongoing crisis of missing and murdered women in Canada. In it, she describes how systemic colonialism and racism affected her as a first-generation descendent of parents who attended residential schools.

As a mother she became determined to come to terms with her personal struggles, she realized how severe the impact of her parents experience in the residential school system had been on herself and her family. 

Morningstar takes the reader through her survival and the aftermath of the trauma she endured as the child of parents who were subjected to the residential school system. Morningstar is adamant ‘warrior spirit’ was not broken. She attributes this to her maternal lineage, her ‘grannies’ as well as the love of her ‘grandfathers’.

Recounting sexual abuse, family violence, poverty, racism, and overcoming her own alcoholism, her inherent strength to survive a myriad of historical atrocities is powerful. Her experience mirrors that of generations of First Peoples, Metis, and Innu peoples throughout Canada and has been affirmed and documented in the Truth and Reconciliation Report two decades after her memoir was published in 1996.

Published by Coteau Books

http://coteaubooks.com/index.php?id=526  

  • Autobiography; Residential School; Activism; MMIW; MMIWG2S; Colonialism; Racism; Addiction; Sexual Abuse; Family Violence; TRC

 

Finding My Talk:  How Fourteen Canadian Native Women Reclaimed Their Lives After Residential School (2004)

Agnes Grant

When residential schools opened in the 1830s, First Nations envisioned their own teachers, ministers, and interpreters. Instead, students were regularly forced to renounce their cultures and languages and some were subjected to degradations and abuses that left severe emotional scars for generations.

In Finding My Talk, fourteen aboriginal women who attended residential schools, or were affected by them, reflect on their experiences. They describe their years in residential schools across Canada and how they overcame tremendous obstacles to become strong and independent members of aboriginal cultures and valuable members of Canadian society.

 Published by Fifth House Publishing

https://www.fifthhousepublishers.ca/Detail/1894856570

  • Residential Schools; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal Communities; Churches; Culture: Indigenous Women; Biographies; Canada

 

Kill the Indian, Save the Man (2004)

Ward Churchill

For five consecutive generations, from roughly 1880 to 1980, Native American children in the United States and Canada were forcibly taken from their families and relocated to residential schools. The stated goal of this government program was to “kill the Indian to save the man.” Half of the children did not survive the experience, and those who did were left permanently scarred. The resulting alcoholism, suicide, and the transmission of trauma to their own children has led to a social disintegration with results that can only be described as genocidal.

Published by City Lights Booksellers and Publishers

http://www.citylights.com/book/?GCOI=87286100529180

  • Genocide; Residential Schools; Alcoholism; Suicide; Trauma; Intergenerational Trauma; Healing; History; Indigenous Studies; Culture; Racism; Identity

 

Aboriginal People Resilience and the Residential School Legacy (2003)

Madeleine Dion Stout & Gregory Kipling

This document provides an in-depth overview of resiliency in relation to Residential School attendees.

Published by the Aboriginal Healing Foundation

http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/resilience.pdf

  • Resiliency; Residential School; Healing

 

The Legacy of School for Aboriginal People: Education; Oppression, and Emancipation (2003)

Bernard Schissel and Terry Wotherspoon

Education is expected to assist students in the development of their personal Identities and the achievement of social and economic success. Yet the aspirations of Aboriginal students have too often been thwarted by the very structures that are supposed to help them. Combining a research study, an extensive review of literature, and an analysis of current trends, Schissel and Wotherspoon detail the harm done to Aboriginal children and their families–not only in the past, when residential schools explicitly set out to eliminate Aboriginal identities, but also in more recent years, when educational systems designed for the mainstream have relegated First Nations students to the sidelines. The authors find hope for the future in four experimental programs from Saskatchewan, in which severely stressed Aboriginal youth have found self-esteem in educational settings that take into account traditional culture and spiritual teachings, as well as academic achievement. Interviews with Aboriginal students provide an additional depth to the authors’ findings.

Published By University of Oxford Press

http://www.oupcanada.com/catalog/9780195416640.html

  • Undergraduate; Canadian Society; Native Studies; Introduction to Sociology of Education; History; Education; Race Social Inequality; Ethnic Relations

 

Amongst God’s Own:  The Enduring Legacy of St. Mary’s Mission (2002)

Terry Glavin

A book by Terry Glavin & former students of St. Mary’s. The story of St. Mary’s Mission on the Fraser River is an insightful and readable account of the integral relationships that shaped its history. One of Canada’s foremost non-fiction writers, Glavin has woven a highly charged narrative around the words of former students and archival photographs to produce a veracious and timeless book.

Published By Longhouse Publishing

https://www.longhousepublishing.ca/amongst-gods-own/

  • Mission; Nonfiction; Archives; Residential School Survivors

 

Victims of Benevolence:  The Dark History of the Williams Lake Residential School (2000)

Elizabeth Furniss

An unsettling study of two tragic events at an Indian residential school in British Columbia which serve as a microcosm of the profound impact the residential school system had on Aboriginal communities in Canada throughout this century. The book’s focal points are the death of a runaway boy and the suicide of another while they were students at the Williams Lake Indian Residential School during the early part of this century. Imbedded in these stories is the complex relationship between the Department of Indian Affairs, the Oblates, and the Aboriginal communities that in turn has influenced relations between government, church, and Aboriginals today.

 Published by Arsenal Pulp Press

http://arsenalpulp.com/bookinfo.php?index=49

  • Residential Schools; British Columbia; Williams Lake; Department of Indian Affairs; Oblates; Aboriginal Communities; Churches

 

A National Crime: The Canadian Government and the Residential School System, 1879 to 1986 (1999)

John Milloy

For over 100 years, thousands of Aboriginal children passed through the Canadian residential school system. Begun in the 1870s, it was intended, in the words of government officials, to bring these children into the “circle of civilization,” the results, however, were far different. More often, the schools provided an inferior education in an atmosphere of neglect, disease, and often abuse.

Using previously unreleased government documents, historian John S. Milloy provides a full picture of the history and reality of the residential school system. He begins by tracing the ideological roots of the system, and follows the paper trail of internal memoranda, reports from field inspectors, and letters of complaint. In the early decades, the system grew without planning or restraint. Despite numerous critical commissions and reports, it persisted into the 1970s, when it transformed itself into a social welfare system without improving conditions for its thousands of wards. A National Crime shows that the residential system was chronically underfunded and often mismanaged, and documents in detail and how this affected the health, education, and well-being of entire generations of Aboriginal children.

Published by University of Manitoba Press

* Margaret McWilliams Award, Manitoba Historical Society (1999)

https://uofmpress.ca/books/detail/a-national-crime

  • Residential School; Indian Act; Indigenous Law; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies

 

From Our Mothers Arms: The Intergenerational Impact of Residential Schools in Saskatchewan (1999)

Constance Deiter

This book discusses the intergenerational impacts stemming from residential school experiences in Saskatchewan.

 Published by United Church Publications

https://www.dundurn.com/books/Red-Wolf

  • Off- reservation Boarding Schools; Saskatchewan; Indigenous Peoples; Education; Cultural Assimilation

 

Kiss of the Fur Queen (1999)

Tomson Highway

Born into a magical Cree world in snowy northern Manitoba, Champion and Ooneemeetoo Okimasis are all too soon torn from their family and thrust into the hostile world of a Catholic residential school. Their language is forbidden, their names are changed to Jeremiah and Gabriel, and both boys are abused by priests. As young men, estranged from their own people and alienated from the culture imposed upon them, the Okimasis brothers fight to survive. Wherever they go, the Fur Queen–a wily, shape-shifting trickster–watches over them with a protective eye. For Jeremiah and Gabriel are destined to be artists. Through music and dance they soar.

Published by Penguin Random House Canada

https://penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/79881/kiss-fur-queen#9780385258807

  • Play; Fiction; Residential School; Tragedy; Catholic Residential School; Cultural Genocide

 

Looking Into The Eyes of Forgotten Dreams (1998)

Joseph A. Dandurand

The book Looking Into the Eyes of My Forgotten Dreams by Joseph A Dandurant ..with subjects such as suicide, small pox, sexual abuse, alcoholism, and the nature of residential school life; this is not poetry for the faint of heart. It is a testament to a lost and alienated culture.

 Published By Kegedonce Press

http://kegedonce.com/bookstore/item/42-looking-into-the-eyes-of-my-forgotten-dreams.html

  • History; Memoirs; Residential Schools; Healing; Addiction; Identity

 

Sing the Brave Song (1998)

Judith Ennamorato

Sing the Brave Song is a dynamic and comprehensive scrutiny of the historic relationship between Indian people, the church, and the vast repercussions endured by former students of Indian residential schools in Canada. Judith Ennamorato’s method of reporting aboriginal traditions is absorbing and potent. From first-time interviews, the reader will see through the eyes of Indian children who were culturally and geographically removed from their homes and families by force; spending as long as ten months a year at institutions where they were forbidden, under threat of corporal punishment, to speak their own language, the only language they knew.

Published By Raven Press Books

https://isbndb.com/book/9780968448908

  • Residential School; Substance Abuse; Native Studies; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Native Studies

 

Differing Visions:  Administering Indian Residential Schooling n Prince Albert, 1867-1995 (1997)

Noel Dyck

“This book tells the story of how residential schooling for Indian children has been administered in Prince Albert for more than a century. In some ways, our experience of residential schooling has been similar to that of other Aboriginal peoples throughout Canada and other countries. In other ways, however, our story is quite different. At a time when Indian residential schools were closing elsewhere in Canada, the people of the Prince Albert Grant Council saw a need to take over and completely remake an institution that had previously been used to direct and control our people. Recognizing the positive role that a completely different kind of Indian-controlled child education centre might play, we have created and pursued our own vision of how to care for and educate those of our children who require special treatment. The courage and commitment that our leaders and staff have shown in working to make this vision a reality deserves to be celebrated. The tactics that federal officials have employed to frustrate and undermine our efforts also need to be recorded.” -Grand Chief Alphonse Bird

Published By Fernwood Publishing

https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/differing-visions

  • Indigenous Resistance; Decolonizing; Residential School; Substance Abuse; Native Studies; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies

 

The Mush Hole:  Life at Two Indian Residential Schools, paper ed (1997)

Elizabeth Graham

The Mush Hole: Life at Two Indian Residential Schools is the 500-plus page compilation of primary source documents about the residential schools, Mohawk Institute and the Mount Elgin Residential Schools in Ontario. Anthropologist Elizabeth Graham worked for years compiling the documentation about the administration of the schools from the original writings of the ministers and staff of both schools, and the government records relating to individual students attending the schools. In addition to the historical records the author allows 60 voices from individual students to speak their truth about their experiences at residential school. The author allows her limited voice to set the stage about the original intent and purpose of the residential school system. The final section of the book allows the students to have the last words through the interviews. The value of this work is the copious amount of detail provided. The work includes black and white photographs, a bibliography, and extensive indexing identifying topics and most importantly the names of students and administrative staff. Highly recommended for families of survivors and those interested in learning from original sources.

Published by Heffle Publishing

http://www.goodminds.com/mush-hole-life-two-indian-residential-schools-paper-ed

  • Iroquois; Mohawk; Multiple Nations; Ojibwe; Residential School

 

Indian Residential Schools:  The Nuu-chah-nulth Experience: Report of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council Indian Residential School Study, 2992-1994 (1996)

Nuu-chahnulth Tribal Council

Report about the experience of the Nuu-chah-nulth in Port Alberni Residential School

Published by the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council

https://books.google.ca/books/about/Indian_residential_schools.html?id=tFErAQAAIAAJ&redir_esc=y

  • Residential School; Nuu-chah-nulth; Residential School Survivors

 

My People Myself (1996)

Mary Lawrence

For many the ’60s were a time of love, peace and experimentation. For Mary Lawrence, the Age of Aquarius was the start of a descent into hell from which she would not emerge for fifteen years.

Mary was put into residential school by her grandmother, who had no idea of what residential school was like. She just wanted Mary, her brothers and sisters to have a good education. At school, Mary first learned that life can be less than just. For the next thirty-odd years, she would endure life on the street, drug addiction, spousal violence, prison, and finally life-threatening illness before she would start the long climb to recovery.

Published by Caitlin Press Inc.

http://caitlin-press.com/our-books/my-people-myself/

  • History; Memoirs; Addiction; Residential School; Reconciliation; Identity; Healing; Indian Residential School

 

No End of Grief (1996)

Agnes Grant

This book examines the history of the Indian Residential Schools established in Canada and the effects of the colonial education of Aboriginals on contemporary native culture. The book recounts the history of the Euro-Amerindian encounter in North America and the foundational beliefs that provided the underpinnings for the creation of the residential system. The author dedicates three chapters to the description of health, infrastructure and academic deficiencies that plagued the system, as well as the abuse of residential students and the consequent long-term damage they experienced. In closing, Grant offers a perspective on the future of political and educational efforts being made to restore and maintain native culture.

Published By Pemmican Publications Inc.

https://www.crrf-fcrr.ca/en/resources/clearinghouse/11-aboriginal-peoples/21353-no-end-of-grief-indian-residential-schools-in-canada

  • Residential School; Substance Abuse; Native Studies; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Native Studies

 

Proclaiming the Gospel to the Indians and the Métis:  The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (1996)

Raymond J.A.Huel

The Oblates followed the Hudson’s Bay Company trade routes into western Canada. They believed ardently in the importance of bringing the gospel to natives of what-to the Oblate-was a new land. This study sheds new light on the complex intersections among cultures, religions and individuals.

                Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/728-9780888642677-proclaiming-the-gospel-to-the-indians-and-the-metis

  • B&W Photos; Notes; Bibliography; The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate; Native Studies; History

 

Shingwauk’s Vision:  A History of Native Residential Schools (1996)

J.R. Millar

With the growing strength of minority voices in recent decades has come much Impassioned discussion of residential schools, the institutions where attendance by Native children was compulsory as recently as the 1960s. Former students have come forward in increasing numbers to describe the psychological and physical abuse they suffered in these schools, and many view the system as an experiment in cultural genocide. In this first comprehensive history of these institutions, J.R. Miller explores the motives of all three agents in the story. He looks at the separate experiences and agendas of the government officials who authorized the schools, the missionaries who taught in them, and the students who attended them.

Starting with the foundations of residential schooling in seventeenth-century New France, Miller traces the modern version of the institution that was created in the 1880s, and, finally, describes the phasing-out of the schools in the 1960s. He looks at instruction, work and recreation, care and abuse, and the growing resistance to the system on the part of students and their families. Based on extensive interviews as well as archival research, Miller’s history is particularly rich in Native accounts of the school system.

This book is an absolute first in its comprehensive treatment of this subject. J.R. Miller has written a new chapter in the history of relations between indigenous and immigrant peoples in Canada.

Published By University of Toronto Press

* Co-winner of the 1996 Saskatchewan Book Award for nonfiction; Winner of the 1996 John Wesley Dafoe Foundation competition for Distinguished Writing by Canadians; Named an ‘Outstanding Book on the subject of human rights in North America’ by the Gustavus Myer Center for the Study of Human Rights in North America.

https://utorontopress.com/ca/shingwauk-s-vision-3

  • Reconciliation; TRC; Literature; Stories; Healing; Residential School; Activism; Colonialism; Racism; Shinwauk; Geocide; Canada; Canadians

 

Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, Volume 1, Chapter 10: “Residential Schools (1996)

Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP). 

The Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) concerns government policy with respect to the original historical nations of this country. Those nations are important to Canada, and how Canada relates to them defines in large measure its sense of justice and its image in its own eyes and before the world.

The RCAP was established by Order in Council on August 26, 1991, and it submitted its report in October 1996.

Published By The Government of Canada

https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/aboriginal-heritage/royal-commission-aboriginal-peoples/Pages/final-report.aspx

  • Canada; Indigenous Peoples; Justice; Residential Schools; History; Recommendations

 

Residential Schools:  The Stolen Years, 2nd Edition (1995)

Linda Jaine

OUT OF PRINT Residential Schools: The Stolen Years is a collection of writings by First Nations survivors of residential schools in Canada. This collection first published in 1993 includes essays, poetry, short stories, and speeches from 21 survivors or children of residential school survivors. The selections detail the feelings of former students as they struggle to understand the tragedy of the church- and state-run schools. The stories also deal with the pain, and the need to find healing. Many of the selections were written by prominent First Nations writers and political activists including Maria Campbell, Phil Fontaine, Janice Acoose, Harold Cardinal, and Louise Halfe. Other writers include Pearl Achneepineskum, Rosa Bell, Elsie Charland, Art Collison, Jack Funk, Lois Guss, Troy Hunter, Mabel James, Vera Manuel, SkyBlue Mary Morin, Bev Sellars, Barney Stirling, Charlie Thompson, Marie Eshkibok-Trudeau, Tom Wassaykeesic. Each writer brings a unique perspective to the discussion of the impact of the residential school system on generations of First Nations families and communities.

Published By OUT OF PRINT

http://www.goodminds.com/residential-schools-stolen-years-2nd-edition-out-print

  • Residential School; Residential School Survivors; Essays; Poetry; Church and State Run Schools

 

Victims of Benevolence:  The Dark Legacy of the Williams Lake Residential School (1991)

Cariboo Tribal Council

Study of government investigations into the care of students at Williams Lake Indian residential school in British Columbia and the deaths of two Shuswap Indian boys in 1902 and 1920.

Published By the Caribou Tribal Council

https://books.google.ca/books?id=kK02DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Victims+of+Benevolence:+The+Dark+Legacy+of+the+Williams+Lake+Residential+School&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjQiNTAsNjZAhVJzVQKHW_7Di8Q6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q=Victims%20of%20Benevolence%3A%20The%20Dark%20Legacy%20of%20the%20Williams%20Lake%20Residential%20School&f=false

  • Residential School; Williams Lake; British Columbia; Abuse

 

Roman Catholic Indian residential Schools in British Columbia (1990)

Thomas Lascelles, OMI

A balanced, detailed study of the BC schools written by the provincial archivist of the Oblates; contains photos, first hand testimonies of former students and teachers, interesting suggestions for further research, and notes citing an extensive list of original sources; available from Oblate House, 1311 The Crescent, Vancouver, BC, email: secretary@omibc.com, tel: 604-736-9363.

Published by Catholic Voices Canada

https://www.catholicvoices.ca/indian-residential-schools-resources-historical-cultural-background/

  • Residential Schools; Catholic Church; Native Studies; History; Indigenous studies

 

Resistance and Renewal:  Surviving the Indian Residential school (1988)

Celia Haig- Brown

One of the first books published to deal with the phenomenon of residential schools in Canada, Resistance and Renewal is a disturbing collection of Native perspectives on the Kamloops Indian Residential School(KIRS) in the British Columbia interior. Interviews with thirteen Natives, all former residents of KIRS, form the nucleus of the book, a frank depiction of school life, and a telling account of the system’s oppressive environment which sought to stifle Native culture. 

Published by Arsnel Press

* Winner of the Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize (BC Book Prize) in 1989. 

http://www.arsenalpulp.com/bookinfo.php?index=8

  • Indigenous Studies; Native Studies; Residential School; Kamloops Indian Residential School

 

Recollections of an Assiniboine Chief (1972)

Dan Kennedy

When a man lives to be a hundred he has many tales to tell. When that man is Dan Kennedy of the Carry the Kettle First Nation in Saskatchewan, his hundred-year-old memories and personal recollections are a part of Canada’s heritage. As Chief Ochankugahe he witnessed the final days of Pre-Contact Assiniboine Sioux society, the turmoil of the Indian Wars, Ghost Dance, the Homestead Era and the Residential Schools. Educated at St. Boniface College, the chief is an articulate, reflective commentator as well as an eye-witness to history. Despite the extreme human trials covered in the book, including famine and war, the Chief uses humour and compassion and is writes without rancour.

Published by McClelland& Stewart

https://www.abebooks.com/book-search/title/recollections-assiniboine-chief/

  • Carry the Kettle; First Nations; Saskatchewan; Assiniboine Sioux Society; Indian Wars; Ghost dance; Residential Schools

 

Peel 6647 (1944)

Jules Jean Marie Joseph LeChevallier

St Michael’s Scholl at Duck Lake: Trails and progress of an Indian school over half a century (1894-1944).

University of Alberta Libraries

http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/bibliography/6647.html

  • Residential Schools; Duck Lake

Indigenous History, Culture & Contemporary Topics

 

Activating the Heart:  Storytelling, Knowledge Sharing, and Relationships (2018)

Julia Christensen, Christopher Cox & Lisa Szabo- Jones

Activating the Heart is an exploration of storytelling as a tool for knowledge production and sharing to build new connections between people and their histories, environments, and cultural geographies. The collection pays particular attention to the significance of storytelling in Indigenous knowledge frameworks and extends into other ways of knowing in works where scholars have embraced narrative and story as a part of their research approach.

Published by Wilfred Laurier Press

https://www.wlupress.wlu.ca/Books/A/Activating-the-Heart

  • Creative Writing; Indigenous Studies; Oral Storytelling

 

Why Indigenous Matters (2018)

Daniel Health Justice

Part survey of the field of Indigenous literary studies, part cultural history, and part literary polemic, Why Indigenous Literatures Matter asserts the vital significance of literary expression to the political, creative, and intellectual efforts of Indigenous peoples today. In considering the connections between literature and lived experience, this book contemplates four key questions at the heart of Indigenous kinship traditions: How do we learn to be human? How do we become good relatives? How do we become good ancestors? How do we learn to live together? Blending personal narrative and broader historical and cultural analysis with close readings of key creative and critical texts, Justice argues that Indigenous writers engage with these questions in part to challenge settler-colonial policies and practices that have targeted Indigenous connections to land, history, family, and self. More importantly, Indigenous writers imaginatively engage the many ways that communities and individuals have sought to nurture these relationships and project them into the future.
This provocative volume challenges readers to critically consider and rethink their assumptions about Indigenous literature, history, and politics while never forgetting the emotional connections of our shared humanity and the power of story to effect personal and social change. Written with a generalist reader firmly in mind, but addressing issues of interest to specialists in the field, this book welcomes new audiences to Indigenous literary studies while offering more seasoned readers a renewed appreciation for these transformative literary traditions.

Published By Wilfrid Laurier Press

https://www.wlupress.wlu.ca/Books/W/Why-Indigenous-Literatures-Matter

  • Literary Criticism; Indigenous Studies; Native Studies; Education; Literature

 

A Quiet Evolution:  The Emergence of Indigenous- Local Intergovernmental Partnerships in Canada  (2016)

Christopher Alcantara and Jen Nelles

Much of the coverage surrounding the relationship between Indigenous communities and the Crown in Canada has focused on the federal, provincial, and territorial governments. Yet it is at the local level where some of the most important and significant partnerships are being made between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

In A Quiet Evolution, Christopher Alcantara and Jen Nelles look closely at hundreds of agreements from across Canada and at four case studies drawn from Ontario, Quebec, and Yukon Territory to explore relationships between Indigenous and local governments. By analyzing the various ways in which they work together, the authors provide an original, transferable framework for studying any type of intergovernmental partnership at the local level. Timely and accessible, A Quiet Evolution is a call to politicians, policymakers and citizens alike to encourage Indigenous and local governments to work towards mutually beneficial partnerships.

Published By University of Toronto Press

https://utorontopress.com/ca/a-quiet-evolution-4

  • Crown; Management and Business; Governance; Native Studies; Political Science; Indigenous Peoples; Indigenous Studies; Law and Society; History

 

The Colonial Problem:  An Indigenous Perspective on Crime and Injustice in Canada (2016)

Lisa Monchalin

Indigenous peoples are vastly overrepresented in the Canadian criminal justice system. The Canadian government has framed this disproportionate victimization and criminalization as being an “Indian problem.”

In The Colonial Problem, Lisa Monchalin challenges the myth of the “Indian problem” and encourages readers to view the crimes and injustices affecting Indigenous peoples from a more culturally aware position. She analyzes the consequences of assimilation policies, dishonoured treaty agreements, manipulative legislation, and systematic racism, arguing that the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian criminal justice system is not an Indian problem but a colonial one.

Published By the University of Toronto Press

https://utorontopress.com/ca/the-colonial-problem-3

  • Criminology; Indigenous History; Indigenous Politics; Political Science; Sociology; Social Inequality; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies

 

First Nations in the Twenty- First Century (2016)

James s. Frideres

Now in its second edition, First Nations in the Twenty-First Century continues to provide unparalleled insight into a wide variety of issues significant to First Nations people across Canada today. Illuminating historical and contemporary developments and concerns, this comprehensive overview offers students a well-rounded, up-to-date understanding of First Nations people’s experiences and their relationships with the rest of Canada

Published by University of Oxford Press

http://www.oupcanada.com/catalog/9780199020430.html

  • First Nations; Twenty- First Century; First Nations History; Contemporary Developments; Relationships; Canada

 

Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism (2016)

John Borrows

Indigenous traditions can be uplifting, positive, and liberating forces when they are connected to living systems of thought and practice. Problems arise when they are treated as timeless models of unchanging truth that require unwavering deference and unquestioning obedience. Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism celebrates the emancipatory potential of Indigenous traditions, considers their value as the basis for good laws and good lives, and critiques the failure of Canadian constitutional traditions to recognize their significance.

Demonstrating how Canada’s constitutional structures marginalize Indigenous peoples’ ability to exercise power in the real world, John Borrows uses Ojibwe law, stories, and principles to suggest alternative ways in which Indigenous peoples can work to enhance freedom. Among the stimulating issues he approaches are the democratic potential of civil disobedience, the hazards of applying originalism rather than living tree jurisprudence in the interpretation of Aboriginal and treaty rights, American legislative actions that could also animate Indigenous self-determination in Canada, and the opportunity for Indigenous governmental action to address violence against women.

Published By University of Toronto Press

* Donald Smiley Prize awarded by the Canadian Political Science Association- Joint winner Or Co-winner in 2017

https://utorontopress.com/ca/freedom-and-indigenous-constitutionalism-4

  • Indigenous Studies; Indigenous Politics; Law Society; Philosophy; Political Science

 

From Recognition to Reconciliation:  Essays on the Constitutional Entrenchment of Aboriginal Rights and Title (2016)

Patrick Mackle eds & Douglas Sanderson eds.

More than thirty years ago, section 35 of the Constitution Act recognized and affirmed “the existing aboriginal and treaty rights of the aboriginal peoples of Canada.” Hailed at the time as a watershed moment in the legal and political relationship between Indigenous peoples and settler societies in Canada, the constitutional entrenchment of Aboriginal and treaty rights has proven to be only the beginning of the long and complicated process of giving meaning to that constitutional recognition.

In From Recognition to Reconciliation, twenty leading scholars reflect on the continuing transformation of the constitutional relationship between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian state. The book features essays on themes such as the role of sovereignty in constitutional jurisprudence, the diversity of methodologies at play in these legal and political questions, and connections between the Canadian constitutional experience and developments elsewhere in the world.

Published by University of Toronto Press

https://utorontopress.com/ca/from-recognition-to-reconciliation-4

  • Indigenous Studies; Indigenous Politics; Law Society; Constitutional Law; Political Science

 

Indigenous Writes:  A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Issues in Canada (2016)

Chelsea Vowel

In Indigenous Writes, Chelsea Vowel initiates myriad conversations about the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canada. An advocate for Indigenous worldviews, the author discusses the fundamental issues the terminology of relationships; culture and identity; myth-busting; state violence; and land, learning, law and treaties along with wider social beliefs about these issues. She answers the questions that many people have on these topics to spark further conversations at home, in the classroom, and in the larger community.

Published By Portage and Main Press

* Winner of the Manuela Dias Book Design and Illustration Award Design Category; ERAC Evaluates and Approved

http://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/indigenous-writes/

  • First Nations, Métis, Inuit, Canada, Indigenous Peoples, Relationships, Indigenous World Views; Culture and Identity: State Violence; Land; Law and Treaties

 

Learn, teach, Challenge:  Approaching Indigenous Literatures (2016)

Deanna Reder & Linda Morra

This is a collection of classic and newly commissioned essays about the study of Indigenous literatures in North America. The contributing scholars include some of the most venerable Indigenous theorists, among them Gerald Vizenor (Anishinaabe), Jeannette Armstrong (Okanagan), Craig Womack (Creek), Kimberley Blaeser (Anishinaabe), Emma LaRocque (Métis), Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee), Janice Acoose (Saulteaux), and Jo-Ann Episkenew (Métis). Also included are settler scholars foundational to the field, including Helen Hoy, Margery Fee, and Renate Eigenbrod. Among the newer voices are both settler and Indigenous theorists such as Sam McKegney, Keavy Martin, and Niigaanwewidam Sinclair.

The volume is organized into five subject areas: Position, the necessity of considering where you come from and who you are; Imagining Beyond Images and Myths, a history and critique of circulating images of Indigenousness; Debating Indigenous Literary Approaches; Contemporary Concerns, a consideration of relevant issues; and finally Classroom Considerations, pedagogical concerns particular to the field. Each section is introduced by an essay that orients the reader and provides ideological context. While anthologies of literary criticism have focused on specific issues related to this burgeoning field, this volume is the first to offer comprehensive perspectives on the subject.

Published By Wilfrid Laurier University Press

https://www.wlupress.wlu.ca/Books/L/Learn-Teach-Challenge

  • Indigenous Studies; Literary Criticism; Stories; History; Myths Images

 

Living on The Land:  Indigenous Women’s Understanding of Place (2016)

Nathalie Kermoal eds. And Isabel Altamirano- Jiménez

An extensive body of literature on Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing has been written since the 1980s. This research has for the most part been conducted by scholars operating within Western epistemological frameworks that tend not only to deny the subjectivity of knowledge but also to privilege masculine authority. As a result, the information gathered predominantly reflects the types of knowledge traditionally held by men, yielding a perspective that is at once gendered and incomplete. Even those academics, communities, and governments interested in consulting with Indigenous peoples for the purposes of planning, monitoring, and managing land use have largely ignored the knowledge traditionally produced, preserved, and transmitted by Indigenous women. While this omission reflects patriarchal assumptions, it may also be the result of the reductionist tendencies of researchers, who have attempted to organize Indigenous knowledge so as to align it with Western scientific categories, and of policy makers, who have sought to deploy such knowledge in the service of external priorities. Such efforts to apply Indigenous knowledge have had the effect of abstracting this knowledge from place as well as from the world view and community—and by extension the gender—to which it is inextricably connected.

Living on the Land examines how patriarchy, gender, and colonialism have shaped the experiences of Indigenous women as both knowers and producers of knowledge. From a variety of methodological perspectives, contributors to the volume explore the nature and scope of Indigenous women’s knowledge, its rootedness in relationships both human and spiritual, and its inseparability from land and landscape. From the reconstruction of cultural and ecological heritage by Naskapi women in Québec to the medical expertise of Métis women in western Canada to the mapping and securing of land rights in Nicaragua, Living on the Land focuses on the integral role of women as stewards of the land and governors of the community. Together, these contributions point to a distinctive set of challenges and possibilities for Indigenous women and their communities.

                Published By AU Press Athabasca University

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120256 

  • Indigenous Knowledge; Ways of Knowing; Western epistemology; gender; Patriarchy; Gender; Colonialism; Indigenous Methodological Perspectives; Indigenous Women Québec; Métis;; Western Canada; Stewards of the Land; Governance; Traditional Governance; Native Studies; History; Indigenous Studies

 

The Promise of Canada:  150 Years- People and Ideas that have Shaped our Country (2016)

Charlotte Gray

On the eve of Canada’s sesquicentennial celebrations comes a richly rewarding new book from acclaimed historian Charlotte Gray about what it means to be Canadian. Readers already know Gray as an award-winning biographer, a writer who has brilliantly captured significant individuals and dramatic moments in our history. Now, in The Promise of Canada, she weaves together masterful portraits of nine influential Canadians, creating a unique history of the country over the past 150 years.

What do these people—from George-Étienne Cartier and Emily Carr to Tommy Douglas, Margaret Atwood, and Elijah Harper—have in common? Each, according to Charlotte Gray, has left an indelible mark on our country. Deliberately avoiding a “top down” approach to our history, Gray has chosen people whose ideas have caught her imagination, ideas that over time have become part of our collective conversation. She also highlights many other Canadians, past and present, who have added to the ongoing debate over how we see ourselves, arguing that Canada has constantly reimagined itself in every generation since 1867.

Beautifully illustrated with evocative black and white images and colourful artistic visions of our country, The Promise of Canada is a fresh take on our history that offers fascinating insights into how we have matured and yet how—150 years after Confederation and beyond—we are still a people in progress. Charlotte Gray makes history come alive as she opens doors into our past, our present and our future, inspiring and challenging readers to envision the Canada they want to live in.

Published By Simon & Schuster Canada

http://www.simonandschuster.ca/books/The-Promise-of-Canada/Charlotte-Gray/9781476784670

  • History; Canada; general Biography; Autobiography; Social History

 

Separate Beds:  A History of Indian Hospitals in Canada,1920’s- 1980’s (2016)

Maureen K. Lux

Separate Beds is the shocking story of Canada’s system of segregated health care. Operated by the same bureaucracy that was expanding health care opportunities for most Canadians, the “Indian Hospitals” were underfunded, understaffed, overcrowded, and rife with coercion and medical experimentation. Established to keep the Aboriginal tuberculosis population isolated, they became a means of ensuring that other Canadians need not share access to modern hospitals with Aboriginal patients.

Tracing the history of the system from its fragmentary origins to its gradual collapse, Maureen K. Lux describes the arbitrary and contradictory policies that governed the “Indian Hospitals,” the experiences of patients and staff, and the vital grassroots activism that pressed the federal government to acknowledge its treaty obligations.

A disturbing look at the dark side of the liberal welfare state, Separate Beds reveals a history of racism and negligence in health care for Canada’s First Nations that should never be forgotten.

Published By University of Toronto Press

* 2017 Canadian Historical Association Aboriginal History Book Prize; The 2017 Royal Society Of Canada Jason A. Hannah Medal 

https://utorontopress.com/us/separate-beds-4

  • Indigenous; Segregated Health care; Indian Hospitals; Underfunding; Overcrowded Hospitals Tuberculosis ; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples

 

The Seven Oaks Reader (2016)

Myrna Kostash eds.

The long rivalry between the Hudson’s Bay Company and the North West Company for control of the fur trade in Canada’s northwest came to an explosive climax on June 19th, 1816, at the so-called Battle of Seven Oaks. Armed buffalo hunters – Indigenous allies of the Nor-Westers – confronted armed colonists of the HBC’s Selkirk settlement near the forks of the Assiniboine and Red Rivers in today’s Winnipeg. This “battle” would prove to be a formative event for Métis self-determination as well as laying down a legacy for settlers to come.

The Seven Oaks Reader offers a comprehensive retelling of one of Canada’s most interesting historical periods, the Fur Trade Wars. As in the companion volume, The Frog Lake Reader, Kostash incorporates period accounts and journals, histories, memoirs, songs and fictional retellings, from a wide range of sources, offering readers an engaging and exciting way back into still-controversial historical events.

                Published By NeWest Press

*2017 Finalist for the Wildrid Eggleston Award for Nonfiction at the Alberta Literary Awards

https://newestpress.com/books/the-seven-oaks-reader-0

  • Indigenous; Hudson Bay Company; North West Company; Fur Trade; Battle of Seven Oaks; Assiniboine River; Red River; Canada; History; Native Studies; History; Indigenous Studies

 

Visiting with the Ancestors:  Blackfoot Shirts in Museum Spaces (2016)

Laura Peers and Alison K. Brown

In the pages of this beautifully illustrated volume is the story of an effort to build a bridge between museums and source communities in hopes of establishing stronger, more sustaining relationships between the two and spurring change in prevailing museum policies. The experience of negotiating the tension between a museum’s institutional protocol described by both the authors and by Blackfoot contributors to the volume was transformative. Museums seek to preserve objects for posterity. However, the emotional and spiritual power of objects does not vanish with the death of those who created them. For Blackfoot people today, these shirts are a living presence, one that evokes a sense of continuity and inspires pride in Blackfoot cultural heritage.

Published By AU Press Athabasca University

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120249

  • History; Canada; Indigenous; Western; Indigenous Studies; Museum Studies

 

Dying From Improvement:  Inquests and Inquiries into Indigenous Deaths in Custody (2015)

Volume 28 Issue 2 p.457-462

Sarah Buhler

In Dying from Improvement, Sherene H. Razack argues that, amidst systematic state violence against Indigenous people, inquiries and inquests serve to obscure the violence of ongoing settler colonialism under the guise of benevolent concern. They tell settler society that it is caring, compassionate, and engaged in improving the lives of Indigenous people – even as the incarceration rate of Indigenous men and women increases and the number of those who die in custody rises.

Published by the University of Toronto Press

https://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs/10.3138/cjwl.28.2.457

  • State Violence; Dying in Custody; Indigenous Peoples; Colonization; Social disparity; Sociology; Political Science; Justice

 

From New Peoples to New Nations: Aspects of Métis History and Identity from the Eighteenth to the Twenty-first Centuries (2015)

Gerhard J. Ens and Joe Sawchuk

From New Peoples to New Nations is a broad historical account of the emergence of the Metis as distinct peoples in North America over the last three hundred years. Examining the cultural, economic, and political strategies through which communities define their boundaries, Gerhard J. Ens and Joe Sawchuk trace the invention and reinvention of Metis identity from the late eighteenth century to the present day. Their work updates, rethinks, and integrates the many disparate aspects of Metis historiography, providing the first comprehensive narrative of Metis identity in more than fifty years.

Based on extensive archival materials, interviews, oral histories, ethnographic research, and first-hand working knowledge of Metis political organizations, From New Peoples to New Nations addresses the long and complex history of Metis identity from the Battle of Seven Oaks to today’s legal and political debates.

 Published By University of Toronto Press

* Shortlisted 2017 Canada Prize in the Humanities and Social Sciences; CHOICE Winner 2016 Outstanding Academic Tittle

https://utorontopress.com/ca/from-new-peoples-to-new-nations-4

  • Anthropology; Indigenous Politics; History; Canada; General; Native Studies; Métis; History; Native American; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies

 

Indigenous Nationhood Empowering Grassroots Citizens (2015)

Pamela Palmater

Forward Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair

Indigenous Nationhood is a selection of blog posts by well-known lawyer, activist and academic Pamela Palmater. Palmater offers critical legal and political commentary and analysis on legislation, Aboriginal rights, Canadian politics, First Nations politics and social issues such as murdered and missing Indigenous women, poverty, economics, identity and culture. Palmater’s writing tackles myths and stereotypes about Indigenous peoples head-on, discusses Indigenous nationhood and nation building, examines treaty rights and provides an accessible, critical analysis of laws and government policies being imposed on Indigenous peoples.

Fiercely anti-racist and anti-colonial, this book is intended to help rebuild the connections between Indigenous citizens and their home communities, local governments and Indigenous Nations for the benefit of future generations.

Published by Fernwood Publishers

https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/indigenous-nationhood

  • Indigenous Nationhood; Activism; Grassroots; Legal Commentary; Political Commentary; Legislation; Aboriginal Rights; Canadian Politics; Indigenous Politics

 

Literary Land Claims: The “Indian Land Question” from Pontiac’s War to Attawapiskat (2015)

Roger Epp eds.

Literature not only represents Canada as “our home and native land” but has been used as evidence of the civilization needed to claim and rule that land. Indigenous people have long been represented as roaming “savages” without land title and without literature. Literary Land Claims: From Pontiac’s War to Attawapiskat analyzes works produced between 1832 and the late 1970s by writers who resisted these dominant notions.

Margery Fee examines John Richardson’s novels about Pontiac’s War and the War of 1812 that document the breaking of British promises to Indigenous nations. She provides a close reading of Louis Riel’s addresses to the court at the end of his trial in 1885, showing that his vision for sharing the land derives from the Indigenous value of respect. Fee argues that both Grey Owl and E. Pauline Johnson’s visions are obscured by challenges to their authenticity. Finally, she shows how storyteller Harry Robinson uses a contemporary Okanagan framework to explain how white refusal to share the land meant that Coyote himself had to make a deal with the King of England.

Fee concludes that despite support in social media for Theresa Spence’s hunger strike, Idle No More, and the Indian Residential School Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the story about “savage Indians” and “civilized Canadians” and the latter group’s superior claim to “develop” the lands and resources of Canada still circulates widely. If the land is to be respected and shared as it should be, literary studies needs a new critical narrative, one that engages with the ideas of Indigenous writers and intellectuals.

                Published By Wilfrid Laurier University Press

https://www.wlupress.wlu.ca/Books/L/Literary-Land-Claims

* Finalist for the 2015 ACQL Gabrielle Roy Prize for Literary Criticism

  • Literary; Literary Nonfiction; Indigenous peoples; Essays; Pontiac; Louis Riel; Grey Owl; Pauline Johnson; Idle No More; TRC; Lands and resources; Indigenous Writers

 

Memory Serves and Other Essays (2015)

Lee Maracle

Memory Serves gathers together the oratories award-winning author Lee Maracle has delivered and performed over a twenty-year period. Revised for publication, the lectures hold the features and style of oratory intrinsic to the Salish people in general and the Sto: lo in particular. From her Coast Salish perspective and with great eloquence, Maracle shares her knowledge of Sto: lo history, memory, philosophy, law, spirituality, feminism and the colonial condition of her people.

Powerful and inspiring, Memory Serves is an extremely timely book, not only because it is the first collection of oratories by one of the most important Indigenous authors in Canada, but also because it offers all Canadians, in Maracle’s own words, “another way to be, to think, to know,” a way that holds the promise of a “journey toward a common consciousness.”

Published By NeWest Press

https://newestpress.com/books/memory-serves

  • Oratories; Indigenous Women; Coast Salish Peoples; Sto;lo Peoples; Philosophy; Law; Spirituality; Feminism; Colonization; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples; General History; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies

 

Northern Communities Working Together:  The Social Economy of Canada’s North (2015)

Chris Southcott eds.

The unique historical, economic, and social features of the Canadian North pose special challenges for the social economy – a sector that includes nonprofits, co-operatives, social enterprises, and community economic development organizations. Northern Communities Working Together highlights the innovative ways in which Northerners are using the social economy to meet their economic, social, and cultural challenges while increasing local control and capabilities. The contributors focus on the special challenges of the North and their impact on the scope of the social economy, including analyses of land claim organizations, hunter support programs, and Indigenous conceptions of the social economy.

A welcome resource for scholars and policy-makers studying any aspect of the Canadian North, Northern Communities Working Together is a major contribution to the literature on the social economy in Canada.

Published By University of Toronto Press

https://utorontopress.com/us/northern-communities-working-together-4

  • Business; Non- Profit Management and Leadership; Indigenous Studies; Indigenous Politics; Social Work

 

Strength for Climbing:  Steps on the Journey of Reconciliation (2015)

Kairos

A resource page focused on Indigenous Rights

https://www.kairoscanada.org/category/indigenous-rights

  • Indigenous Rights

 

Teaching Each Other; Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies, paper ed (2015)

Linda Goulet & Keith Goulet

Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies by authors Linda Goulet and Keith Goulet provides an alternative framework for teachers working with Indigenous students — one that moves beyond acknowledging Indigenous culture to one that actually strengthens Indigenous identity. Drawing on Nehinuw (Cree) concepts such as kiskinaumatowin, or “teaching each other,” Goulet and Goulet provide a new approach to teaching Indigenous students. In the effort to improve outcomes for First Nations students most Indigenous education at the K-12 level still takes place within a theoretical framework based in Eurocentric thought. Just as beaders learn how to improve their own designs and techniques from watching other beaders work, kiskinaumatowin, when applied in the classroom, transforms the normally hierarchical teacher-student relationship by making students and teachers equitable partners in education. Enriched with the success stories of educators who use Nehinuw concepts in Saskatchewan, Canada, this book demonstrates how this framework works in practice. The result is an alternative teaching model that can be used by teachers anywhere who want to engage with students whose culture may be different from the mainstream. Chapters include the key principles necessary to achieve success using this framework: Weechihitowin, Helping and Supporting Relationships: The Foundation; Weetutoskemitowin, Working Together: Social Systems; Iseechigehina, Planned Actions: Connection to the Process; Weechiseechigemitowin, Strategic Alliances: Connection to the Content; and Ininee mamitoneneetumowin, Indigenous Thinking: Emerging Theory of Indigenous Education. This book contains a helpful index, notes and references. Linda M. Goulet is a professor of Indigenous education at First Nations University of Canada. Keith N. Goulet is an adjunct professor of Indigenous studies at First Nations University of Canada.

Published by UBC Press

* Shortlisted, 2015 University of Saskatchewan President’s Office Non-Fiction Award; Saskatchewan Book Awards.

https://www.ubcpress.ca/teaching-each-other

  • Aboriginal Education; Education; Educational Policy & Theory; Indigenous Studies

 

Unsettling Canada:  A National Wake- Up Call (2015)

Arthur Manuel & Grand Chief Ronald M. Derrickson

Forward by Naomi Klein

Unsettling Canada, a Canadian bestseller, is built on a unique collaboration between two First Nations leaders, Arthur Manuel and Grand Chief Ron Derrickson.

Both men have served as chiefs of their bands in the B.C. interior and both have gone on to establish important national and international reputations. But the differences between them are in many ways even more interesting. Arthur Manuel is one of the most forceful advocates for Aboriginal title and rights in Canada and comes from the activist wing of the movement. Grand Chief Ron Derrickson is one of the most successful Indigenous businessmen in the country.

Together the Secwepemc activist intellectual and the Syilx (Okanagan) businessman bring a fresh perspective and new ideas to Canada’s most glaring piece of unfinished business: the place of Indigenous peoples within the country’s political and economic space. The story is told through Arthur’s voice but he traces both of their individual struggles against the colonialist and often racist structures that have been erected to keep Indigenous peoples in their place in Canada.

In the final chapters and in the Grand Chief’s afterword, they not only set out a plan for a new sustainable indigenous economy, but lay out a roadmap for getting there.

Published By Between the Lines

* 2016 Canadian Historical Association History Book Prize

https://btlbooks.com/book/unsettling-canada

  • Sustainable Economy; Indigenous Rights; Indigenous Justice; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies; British Columbia; Aboriginal Title and Rights; Secwepemc activist intellectual: Businessman; Political Science; Economics

 

War Paintings of the Tsuu T’ina Nation (2015)

Arni Brownstone

During much of the nineteenth century, paintings functioned as the Plains Indians’ closest equivalent to written records. The majority of their paintings documented warfare, focusing on specific war deeds. These pictorial narratives continue to expand historical knowledge of a people and place in transition. Arni Brownstone studies several important war paintings and artifact collections of the Tsuu T’ina (Sarcee) that provide insight into the changing relations between the Tsuu T’ina, other plains tribes, and non-Native communities during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. All known Tsuu T’ina paintings are considered in the study, as are several important collections of Tsuu T’ina artifacts. Brownstone’s work furthers our understanding of Tsuu T’ina pictographic war paintings in relation to the social, historical, and artistic forces that influenced them and provides a broader understanding of pictographic painting, one of the richest and most important Native American artistic and literary genres.

Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/314-9781772120523-war-paintings-of-the-tsuu-tina-nation

  • Native Studies; Art; Great Plains; Indigenous Studies, History

 

We Are Coming Home:  Repatriation and the Restoration of Blackfoot Cultural Confidence (2015)

Gerald T. Conaty

“We Are Coming Home!” is the story of the highly complex process of repatriation as described by those intimately involved in the work, notably the Piikuni, Siksika, and Kainai elders who provided essential oversight and guidance. We also hear from the Glenbow Museum’s president and CEO at the time and from an archaeologist then employed at the Provincial Museum of Alberta who provides an insider’s view of the drafting of FNSCORA. These accounts are framed by Conaty’s reflections on the impact of museums on First Nations, on the history and culture of the Niitsitapi, or Blackfoot, and on the path forward. With Conaty’s passing in August of 2013, this book is also a tribute to his enduring relationships with the Blackfoot, to his rich and exemplary career, and to his commitment to innovation and mindful museum practice.

Published By AU Press Athabasca University

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120242

  • Anthropology; Archaeology; History; Canada; Indigenous History; Indigenous Studies; Western History; Public Policy

 

The Comeback:  How Aboriginals Are Reclaiming Power and Influence (2014)

John Ralston Saul

Wide in scope but piercing in detail, The Comeback presents a powerful portrait of modern Aboriginal life in Canada, in contrast with the perceived failings so often portrayed in politics and in media. Saul illustrates his arguments by compiling a remarkable selection of letters, speeches and writings by Aboriginal leaders and thinkers, showcasing the extraordinarily rich, moving and stable indigenous point of view across the centuries. 

Published By Viking

https://penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/417490/comeback#9780143193159 

  • Native Studies; Treaties; Indigenous Studies; Canadian History; Social Science; Native American Studies

 

Indian Don’t Cry:  Gaawiin Mawisiiwag Anishinaabeg (2014)

George Kenny

Renate Elgenbrod eds

Patricia Ningewance Translator

Indians Don’t Cry: Gaawin Mawisiiwag Anishinaabeg is the second book in the First Voices, First Texts series, which publishes lost or underappreciated texts by Indigenous artists. This new bilingual edition includes a translation of Kenny’s poems and stories into Anishinaabemowin by Patricia M. Ningewance and an afterword by literary scholar Renate Eigenbrod.

 Published by The University of Manitoba Press

https://uofmpress.ca/books/detail/indians-dont-cry

  • First Voices; Anishinaabeg; Indigenous Peoples; Indigenous Artists; Poetry; Stories

 

Indivisible:  Indigenous Human Rights (2014)

Joyce Green eds.

Indigenous rights are generally conceptualized and advocated separately from the human rights framework. The contributors to Indivisible: Indigenous Human Rights, however, deftly and powerfully argue that Indigenous rights are in fact human rights and that the fundamental human rights of Indigenous people cannot be protected without the inclusion of their Indigenous rights, which are suppressed and oppressed by the forces of racism and colonialism. Drawing on a wealth of experience and blending critical theoretical frameworks and a close knowledge of domestic and international law on human rights, the authors in this collection show that settler states such as Canada persist in violating and failing to acknowledge Indigenous human rights. Furthermore, settler states are obligated to respect and animate these rights, despite the evident tensions in political and economic interests between elite capitalists, settler citizens and Indigenous peoples.

Published by Fernwood Publishing

https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/indivisible

  • Canadian Politics; Indigenous Resistance; Decolonization

 

On Being Here to Stay:  Treaties and Aboriginal Rights in Canada (2014)

Michael Asch

What, other than numbers and power, justifies Canada’s assertion of sovereignty and jurisdiction over the country’s vast territory? Why should Canada’s original inhabitants have to ask for rights to what was their land when non-Aboriginal people first arrived? The question lurks behind every court judgment on Indigenous rights, every demand that treaty obligations be fulfilled, and every land-claims negotiation.

Addressing these questions has occupied anthropologist Michael Asch for nearly thirty years. In On Being Here to Stay, Asch retells the story of Canada with a focus on the relationship between First Nations and settlers.

Asch proposes a way forward based on respecting the “spirit and intent” of treaties negotiated at the time of Confederation, through which, he argues, First Nations and settlers can establish an ethical way for both communities to be here to stay.

Published By University of Toronto Press

* 2015 Canada Prize in the Social Sciences Awarded by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

https://utorontopress.com/ca/on-being-here-to-stay-4

  • Anthropology; Indigenous Studies; Law Society; Political Science; Indigenous Politics

 

A Metaphoric Mind:  Selected Writings of Joseph Couture (2013)

Ruth Couture eds. & Virginia McGowan eds.

Forward by Lewis Cardinal

Joseph Couture (1930–2007), known affectionately as “Dr. Joe,” stood at the centre of some of the greatest political, social, and intellectual struggles of Aboriginal peoples in contemporary Canada. A profound thinker and writer, as well as a gifted orator, he easily walked two paths, as a respected Elder and traditional healer and as an educational psychologist, one of the first Aboriginal people in Canada to receive a PhD. A Metaphoric Mindbrings together for the first time key works selected from among Dr. Joe’s writings, published and unpublished. Shaped by his social science training but also by his apprenticeship in Medicine Ways, his writings allow us to experience the richness and power of fully functional Indigenous culture.

Published By AU Press Athabasca University

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120198

  • Education; Indigenous Studies; Religion; Spirituality

 

Disinherited Generations:  Our struggle to Reclaim Treaty Rights for First Nations Women and Their Decedents (2013)

Nellie Carlson and Kathleen Steihauer

This oral autobiography of two remarkable Cree women tells their life stories against a backdrop of government discrimination, First Nations activism, and the resurgence of First Nations communities. Nellie Carlson and Kathleen Steinhauer, who helped to organize the Indian Rights for Indian Women movement in western Canada in the 1960s, fought the Canadian government’s interpretation of treaty and Aboriginal rights, the Indian Act, and the male power structure in their own communities in pursuit of equal rights for Aboriginal women and children. After decades of activism and court battles, First Nations women succeeded in changing these oppressive regulations, thus benefitting thousands of their descendants. Those interested in human rights, activism, history, and Native Studies will find that these personal stories, enriched by detailed notes and photographs, form a passionate record of an important, continuing struggle.

Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/79-9780888646422-disinherited-generations

  • Native Studies; Human Rights; Women’s Studies; Oral History 
    Political Studies; Native Studies; Women’s Studies; Social Science; Ethnic Studies; Native American Studies,; Indigenous Studies; Political Science 

 

Healing Histories:  Stories from Canadian Indian Hospitals (2013)

Laurie Meijer Drees

Healing Histories is the first detailed collection of Aboriginal perspectives on the history of tuberculosis in Canada’s indigenous communities and on the federal government’s Indian Health Services. Featuring oral accounts from patients, families, and workers who experienced Canada’s Indian Hospital system, it presents a fresh perspective on health care history that includes the diverse voices and insights of the many people affected by tuberculosis and its treatment in the mid-twentieth century. This intercultural history models new methodologies and ethics for researching and writing about indigenous Canada based on indigenous understandings of “story” and its critical role in Aboriginal historicity, while moving beyond routine colonial interpretations of victimization, oppression, and cultural destruction. Written for both academic and popular reading audiences, Healing Histories is essential reading for those interested in Canadian Aboriginal history, history of medicine and nursing, and oral history.

Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/180-9780888646507-healing-histories

  • Native Studies; Health care; Oral History; Canadian History; Medical; Health care Delivery; Health and Medicine; Indigenous Studies

 

Ipperwash:  The Tragic Failure of Canada’s Aboriginal Policy (2013)

Edward Hedican

On September 6, 1995, Dudley George was shot by Ontario Provincial Police officer Kenneth Deane. He died shortly after midnight the next day. George had been participating in a protest over land claims in Ipperwash Provincial Park, which had been expropriated from the native Ojibwe after the Second World War. A confrontation erupted between members of the Stoney Point and Kettle Point Bands and officers of the OPP’s Emergency Response Team, which had been instructed to use necessary force to disband the protest by Premier Mike Harris’s government. George’s death and the grievous mishandling of the protest led to the 2007 Ipperwash Inquiry.

Edward J. Hedican’s Ipperwash provides an incisive examination of protest and dissent within the context of land claims disputes and Aboriginal rights. Hedican investigates how racism and government practices have affected Aboriginal resistance to policies, especially those that have resulted in the loss of Aboriginal lands and led to persistent socio-economic problems in Native communities. He offers a number of specific solutions and policy recommendations on how Aboriginal protests can be resolved using mediation and dispute management – instead of the coercive force used in Ipperwash Park that ultimately gave this tragic story such infamy.

Published By University of Toronto Press

* Shortlisted in 2014 Speaker’s Book Award by Legislative Assembly of Ontario

https://utorontopress.com/us/ipperwash-4#

  • Anthropology; Indigenous Studies; Indigenous Politics; Political Science; Ipperwash

 

Métis in Canada:  History, Identity, Law and Politics (2013)

Christopher Adams, Gregg Dahl and Ian Peach eds.

These twelve essays constitute a groundbreaking volume of new work prepared by leading scholars in the fields of history, anthropology, constitutional law, political science, and sociology, who identify the many facets of what it means to be Métis in Canada today. After the Powley decision in 2003, Métis people were no longer conceptually limited to the historical boundaries of the fur trade in Canada. Key ideas explored in this collection include identity, rights, and issues of governance, politics, and economics. The book will be of great interest to scholars in political science and native studies, the legal community, public administrators, government policy advisors, and people seeking to better understand the Métis past and present. Contributors: Christopher Adams, Gloria Jane Bell, Glen Campbell, Gregg Dahl, Janique Dubois, Tom Flanagan, Liam J. Haggarty, Laura-Lee Kearns, Darren O’Toole, Jeremy Patzer, Ian Peach, Siomonn P. Pulla, Kelly L. Saunders.

Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/175-9780888646408-metis-in-canada

  • Native Studies; Political Science; Canadian History; Native American; Indigenous Peoples; Indigenous Studies; Law and Society; History

 

The Inconvenient Indian:  A Curious Account of Native People in North America (2012)

Thomas King

The Inconvenient Indian is at once a “history” and the complete subversion of a history—in short, a critical and personal meditation that the remarkable Thomas King has conducted over the past 50 years about what it means to be “Indian” in North America. 

Rich with dark and light, pain and magic, this book distills the insights gleaned from that meditation, weaving the curiously circular tale of the relationship between non-Natives and Natives in the centuries since the two first encountered each other. In the process, King refashions old stories about historical events and figures, takes a sideways look at film and pop culture, relates his own complex experiences with activism, and articulates a deep and revolutionary understanding of the cumulative effects of ever-shifting laws and treaties on Native peoples and lands. 

This is a book both timeless and timely, burnished with anger but tempered by wit, and ultimately a hard-won offering of hope — a sometimes inconvenient, but nonetheless indispensable account for all of us, Indian and non-Indian alike, seeking to understand how we might tell a new story for the future.

Published By Penguin Random House

* 2014 RBC Taylor Prize; National Best Seller; 2015 Winner of the CBCBookie Awards for Nonfiction; 2014 Winner of the British Columbia’s National Award for Canadian Nonfiction; 2013 Winner of Candian Booksellers; Association Nonfiction Book of the Year; 2015 Finalist for Canada Reads;2014 Finalist for Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction; 2013 Finalist for the Trillium Award

https://penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/93028/inconvenient-indian#9780385664226

  • Indian Act; Public Policy; Social Inequality; Indigenous History; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies; Indigenous Politics; Canadian Government

 

No- Nonsense Guide to Indigenous Peoples, Second Edition (2012)

Lotte Hughes

Since the first edition of the No-Nonsense Guide to Indigenous Peoples was published in 2003, much has changed. The United Nations General Assembly has adopted the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous rights have become an increasingly important subject in international law, with Bolivia’s first indigenous president, Evo Morales, arguing on the international stage from an indigenous perspective, and introducing policies benefiting indigenous communities through land reforms and redistribution of wealth. Moreover, there has been a surge in indigenous activism and advocacy, with the growth of a global indigenous rights industry, the effects of which are not always positive. This updated edition reflects the changing context and examines the developments as well as the tensions and contradictions, and includes as many direct voices as possible.

Published by Between the Lines

https://btlbooks.com/book/no-nonsense-guide-to-indigenous-peoples-second-edition

  • United Nation; UNDRIP; International Law; Indigenous Perspective; Indigenous Peoples; Indigenous Rights Industry

 

Talking Tools:  Faces of Aboriginal Oral Tradition in Contemporary Society:  Solstice Series (2012)

Patrick Scott

Talking Tools: Faces of Aboriginal Oral Tradition in Contemporary Society explores the power of oral tradition in Aboriginal society as a foundational cultural and linguistic tool. Four distinct elements are examined: the story-keepers; the importance of practice; the emergence of new stories; and the challenges of sustainability. Finally, the emergence of new technologies and their relevance to the sustainability of the tradition and art of storytelling are discussed. Solstice Series No. 6

Published by University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/344-9781896445595-talking-tools

  • Native Studies; Tinne Indians; Mackenzie valley Pipeline; Social Science; Anthropology; Culture; Native Studies; Oral History; Indigenous Studies

 

First Nations 101 Tons of Stuff You Need to Know about First Nations People (2011)

Lynda Gray

First Nations 101 is an informative and opinionated guide to First Nations issues. Written in an accessible style and with a wry sense of humor, Lynda Gray provides readers with a broad overview of the diverse and complex day-to-day realities of First Nations people. Jam-packed with information on more than 70 subjects including urbanization, veterans, feminism, appropriate questions to ask a First Nations person, child welfare, the medicine wheel, food access, Two-spirit (LGBT), residential schools, the land bridge theory, National Aboriginal History Month, and language preservation, First Nations 101 endeavors to leave readers with a better understanding of the shared history of First Nations and non-First Nations people. Ultimately, the author calls upon all of us – individuals, communities, and governments – to play active roles in bringing about true reconciliation between First Nations and non-First Nations people. Lynda Gray is member of the Tsimshian Nation from Lax Kw’alaams on the Northwest Coast of British Columbia. One dollar from the sale of each book will be donated to the Urban Native Youth Association’s capital campaign to build a Native Youth Centre in Vancouver.

Published By Adaawx Publishing

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=17847675119

  • First Nations; Humour; Urbanization; veterans; Feminism; Child Welfare; National Aboriginal History Month; LGBTQ; British Columbia

 

Recollecting:  Lives of Aboriginal Women of the Canadian Northwest and Borderlands (2011)

Sarah Carter eds. & Patricia A. McCormack eds.

Recollecting is a rich collection of essays that illuminate the lives of Aboriginal women from the late-eighteenth century to the mid -twentieth century. They have often been overlooked in sweeping narratives of the history of the West. Some essays focus on individual women – a trader, a performer, a non-human woman – while others examine cohorts of women – wives, midwives, seamstresses, nuns. Authors look beyond the documentary record to and standard representations of women, drawing also on records generated by the women themselves, including their beadwork, other material culture, and oral histories.

Published by AU Press Athabasca University

* Winner 2012 Willa Literary Award in the area of Scholarly Nonfiction; Winner of the 2012 best Book in Aboriginal History Prize by the Canadian Historical Association; Winner f the 2012 award for Best Scholarly and Academic Book by the Book Publishers Association of Alberta; Winner of the 2011 Armitage-Jameson Prize by the Western History Association and the Coalition for Western Women’s History

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120137

  • Aboriginal Women; Late Eighteenth Century; Mid-Twentieth Century Anthropology; Canadian Regions; History; Indigenous Studies; Archeology; Oral Histories; Culture; gender; race; identity

 

The Sasquatch at Home:  Traditional Protocols & Modern Storytelling (2011)

Eden Robinson

In March 2010 the Canadian Literature Centre hosted award-winning novelist and storyteller Eden Robinson at the 4th annual Henry Kreisel Lecture. Robinson shared an intimate look into the intricacies of family, culture, and place through her talk, “The Sasquatch at Home.” Robinson’s disarming honesty and wry irony shine through her depictions of her and her mother’s trip to Graceland, the potlatch where she and her sister received their Indian names, how her parents first met in Bella Bella (Waglisla, British Columbia) and a wilderness outing where she and her father try to get a look at b’gwus, the Sasquatch. Readers of memoir, Canadian literature, Aboriginal history and culture, and fans of Robinson’s delightful, poignant, sometimes quirky tales will love The Sasquatch at Home.

Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/167-9780888645593-sasquatch-at-home

  • Memoirs; Literature; Graceland; Potlatch; Wilderness; Aboriginal History; Identity

 

Walking in The Woods (2011)

Herb Belcourt

Reflecting on his evolving identity as a human being, a Canadian and a Métis westerner, Herb Belcourt tells the remarkable story of one familys enduring connection to the dramatic history of western Canada. Belcourt traces his ancestry directly to an early French-Canadian voyageur and his Cree-Métis wife who lived in Ruperts Land after 1800. The eldest of ten children, Belcourt grew up in a small log home near Lac Ste. Anne during the Depression. His father purchased furs from local First Nations and Métis trappers and, with arduous work, began a family fur trading business that survives to this day. When Belcourt left home at 15 to become a labourer in coal mines and sawmills, his father told him to save his money so he could work for himself. Over the next three decades, Belcourt began a number of small Alberta businesses that prospered and eventually enabled him to make significant contributions to the Métis community in Alberta.

Belcourt has devoted over 30 years of his life to improving access to affordable housing and further education for aboriginal Albertans. In 1971, he co-founded Canative Housing Corporation, a non-profit agency charged with providing homes for urban aboriginal people who confronted housing discrimination in Edmonton and Calgary. In 2004, Belcourt and his colleagues established the Belcourt Brosseau Métis Awards Fund, a $13-million endowment with a mandate to support the educational dreams of Métis youth and mature students in Alberta and to make a permanent difference in the lives of Métis Albertans.

Awarded an honourary doctorate of laws by the University of Alberta in 2001, Belcourt is also the 2006 recipient of a National Aboriginal Achievement Award for Housing. In this memoir, Walking In the Woods, he describes Albertas opportunities with admiration while speaking bluntly about the loss of aboriginal and Métis land in western Canada, and about the difficult consequences of generations of interracial misunderstanding in the West. Addressed to young Métis, and to all Canadians, he speaks with compelling candour about his love for this country, and his concerns about its future.

Published by Bindle & Glass

http://www.brindleandglass.com/book_details.php?isbn_upc=9781897142172  

  • Indigenous Peoples; Métis; History; Memoirs; Western Canada; Métis leadership; Fur Trade; Economic Development

 

Alliances:  Re/envisioning Indigenous-non-Indigenous Relationships (2010)

Lynne Davis eds.

When Indigenous and non-Indigenous activists work together, what are the ends that they seek, and how do they negotiate their relationships while pursuing social change? Alliances brings together Indigenous and non-Indigenous leaders, activists, and scholars in order to examine their experiences of alliance-building for Indigenous rights and self-determination and for social and environmental justice.

The contributors, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, come from diverse backgrounds as community activists and academics. They write from the front lines of struggle, from spaces of reflection rooted in past experiences, and from scholarly perspectives that use emerging theories to understand contemporary instances of alliance. Some contributors reflect on methods of mental decolonization while others use Indigenous concepts of respectful relationships in order to analyze present-day interactions. Most importantly, Alliances delves into the complex political and personal relationships inherent in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous struggles for social justice to provide insights into the tensions and possibilities of Indigenous-non-Indigenous alliance and coalition-building in the early twenty-first century.

https://utorontopress.com/us/alliances-4

  • Anthropology; Indigenous Studies; Indigenous Politics

 

In/Visable Sight:  The Mixed- Descent Families of Southern New Zealand (2010)

Angela Wanhalla

In/visible Sight is a fascinating exploration of a little-known part of our history: the lives of part-Māori, part-Pākehā New Zealanders in the nineteenth century.

Focusing on interracial intimacy between Ngāi Tahu and Pākehā settlers, it explores how intermarriage played a key role in shaping colonial encounters. As Ngāi Tahu sought to fight the alienation of their land and protect their natural resources, marriage practices and kinship networks became an increasingly important way to control interaction with Pākehā.

The book also explores the contradictions and ambiguities of mixed-descent lives, offering new insights into New Zealand’s colonial past.

Published by AU Press Athabasca University

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120170

  • Anthropology; Communication Studies; Cultural Studies; Political Studies; International Studies; Sociology

 

People of The Lakes:  Stories of our Van Gwich’in Elders/ Googwandak Nakhwach’ànjòo Van Tat Gwich’in (2010)

Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation and Shirleen Smith

Many people have a mental picture of the Canadian north that juxtaposes beauty with harshness. For the Van Tat Gwich’in, the northern Yukon is home, with a living history passed on from elders to youth. This book consists of oral accounts that the Elders have been recording for 50 years, representing more than 150 years of their history, all meticulously translated from Gwich’in. Yet this is more than a gathering of history; collaborator Shirleen Smith provides context for the stories, whether they are focused on an individual or international politics. Anthropologists, folklorists, ethnohistorians, political scientists, economists, members of First Nations, and readers interested in Canada’s northernmost regions will find much to fascinate them.

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/145-9780888645050-people-of-the-lakes

  • Native Studies; Oral History; The North; Native American; Polar Regions; Indigenous Studies

 

The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book (2010)

Gord Hill

The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book is a powerful and historically accurate graphic portrayal of Indigenous resistance to the European colonization of the Americas, beginning with the Spanish invasion under Christopher Columbus and ending with the Six Nations land reclamation in Ontario in 2006. Gord Hill spent two years unearthing images and researching historical information to create The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book, which presents the story of Aboriginal resistance in a far-reaching format.

Other events depicted include the 1680 Pueblo Revolt in New Mexico; the Inca insurgency in Peru from the 1500s to the 1780s; Pontiac and the 1763 Rebellion & Royal Proclamation; Geronimo and the 1860s Seminole Wars; Crazy Horse and the 1877 War on the Plains; the rise of the American Indian Movement in the 1960s; 1973’s Wounded Knee; the Mohawk Oka Crisis in Quebec in 1990; and the 1995 Aazhoodena/Stoney Point resistance.

With strong, plain language and evocative illustrations, The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book documents the fighting spirit and ongoing resistance of Indigenous peoples through 500 years of genocide, massacres, torture, rape, displacement, and assimilation: a necessary antidote to the conventional history of the Americas.

Published By Arsenal Pulp Press

http://www.arsenalpulp.com/bookinfo.php?index=317

  • First Nations, Comic; History; Indigenous Resistance; Colonization; Six Nations;1763 Rebellion; Royal Proclamation; Genocide; Residential Schools; TRC; Government Sanctioned Exploitation; Relationships; Indigenous World Views; Culture and Identity: State Violence; Land; Law and Treaties

 

The Frog Lake Reader (2009)

Myrna Kostash eds.

Non-fiction authority Myrna Kostash merges the past and the present in The Frog Lake Reader, which offers a startlingly objective perspective on the tragic events surrounding the Frog Lake Massacre of 1885. By bringing together eyewitness accounts and journal excerpts, memoirs and contemporary fiction, and excerpts from interviews with historians, Kostash provides a panoramic perspective on a tragedy often overshadowed by Louis Riel’s rebellion during the same year. The history is contentious and its interpretation unresolved, but The Frog Lake Reader, with its broad survey of vital historical accounts and points of view, offers the most comprehensive and informative narrative on the Frog Lake Massacre to date.

                Published By NeWest Press

*Canadian Authors’ Association Exporting Alberta Award; Shortlisted- Alberta Readers Choice Award

https://newestpress.com/books/frog-lake-reader-the

  • Indigenous; Frog Lake; Massacre; Memoirs; Contemporary Fiction; History; Lois Riel; Native Studies; History; Indigenous Studies

 

Taking Back Our Spirits:/ Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing (2009)

Jo-Ann Episkenew

From the earliest settler policies to deal with the “Indian problem,” to contemporary government-run programs ostensibly designed to help Indigenous people, public policy has played a major role in creating the historical trauma that so greatly impacts the lives of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples. Taking Back Our Spirits traces the link between Canadian public policies, the injuries they have inflicted on Indigenous people, and Indigenous literature’s ability to heal individuals and communities. Episkenew examines contemporary autobiography, fiction, and drama to reveal how these texts respond to and critique public policy, and how literature functions as “medicine” to help cure the colonial contagion.

Published by University of Manitoba Press

* 2009 Winner of the Saskatchewan Book Award for Scholarly Writing; 210 Winner of the Saskatchewan Book Award for First Peoples’ Writing

https://uofmpress.ca/books/detail/taking-back-our-spirits

  • Indian Policy; Federal Government; Indian Act; Public Policy; Indigenous Polilitics

 

Gifted to Learn (2008)

Gloria Mehlmann

In 1960s Regina, when racial discrimination often went unchallenged, and the education system needed visionary reform, Gloria Mehlmann struggled to embrace her Cree/Saulteaux identity and sustain her passion for learning and teaching. Critical but not cynical, Mehlmann’s touching stories reveal the experiences and students that taught her to become one of Saskatchewan’s guiding voices for education reform. While devotees of memoir will be transported by Mehlmann’s humane storytelling, specialists in Native Studies, Education, Women’s Studies, and Autobiography are also invited to explore the clear, strong prose within Gifted to Learn.

Published University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/59-9780888644985-gifted-to-learn

  • Memoirs; Addiction; Native Studies; Women’s Studies; Autobiography; Cree/ Saulteaux

 

Imagining Head- Smashed-In:  Aboriginal Buffalo Hunting on the Northern Plains (2008)

Jack Brink

For millennia, Aboriginal hunters on the North American Plains used their knowledge of the land and of buffalo behaviour to drive their quarry over cliffs. Archaeologist Jack Brink has written a major study of the mass buffalo hunts and the culture they supported before and after European contact. By way of example, he draws on his 25 years excavating at Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump in southwestern Alberta, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Published by AU Press Athabasca University

* 2012 Winner of the Felicia A. Holton Book Award; @009 City of Edmonton Book Prize; Best Archeology Book of 2009; 2009 Communication Award in recognition of his outstanding contribution to Canadian Archaeology; Winner at the Alberta Book Publishing Awards

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120137

  • Anthropology; Canadian Regions; History; Indigenous Studies; Archeology; Buffalo; Culture

 

We Are All Treaty People:  Prairie Essays (2008)

Roger Epp

In his collection of Prairie essays-some of them profoundly personal, some poetic, some political-Roger Epp considers what it means to dwell attentively and responsibly in the rural West. He makes the provocative claim that Aboriginal and settler alike are “Treaty people”; he retells inherited family stories in that light; he reclaims the rural as a site of radical politics; and he thinks alongside contemporary farm people whose livelihoods and communities are now under intense economic and cultural pressure. We Are All Treaty People invites those who feel the pull of a prairie heritage to rediscover the poetry surging through the landscapes of the rural West, among its people and their political economy.

 Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/268-9780888645067-we-are-all-treaty-people

  • Biography; Autobiography; Literary; Literary Nonfiction; Rural West; Political Economy; Political Science; Essays; Political Science; Indigenous Studies

 

Native Settlers Then and Now:  Historical Issues and Current Perspectives on Treaties and Land Claims in Canada (2007)

Paul W. DePasquale eds.

“Natives and Settlers provides a beginning to what should be (and should have been) a continuing, respectful discussion.” -Blanca Schorcht, Associate Professor, University of Northern British Columbia Is Canada truly postcolonial? Burdened by a past that remains ‘refracted’ in its understanding and treatment of Native peoples, this collection reinterprets treaty making and land claims from Aboriginal perspectives. These five essays not only provide fresh insights to the interpretations of treaties and treaty-making processes, but also examine land claims still under negotiation. Natives and Settlers reclaims the vitality of Aboriginal laws and paradigms in Canada, a country new to decolonization.

Published By The University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/132-9780888644626-natives-and-settlers-now-and-then

  • History; Canada; General; Native Studies; History; Native American; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Treaties

 

Slash (2007)

Jeannette Armstorng

Slash is Jeannette Armstrong’s first novel.  It poignantly traces the struggles, pain and alienation of a young Okanagan man who searches for truth and meaning in his life.  Recognized as an important work of literature.  Slash is used in high schools, colleges, and universities.

Published By Theytus Books

http://www.theytus.com/Book-List/Slash

  • Fiction; Okanagan; Healing; Identity; Vision

 

Weasel Tail:  Stories Told By Joe Crowshoe Sr. ( Aapohsoy’yiis), a Peigan- Blackfoot Elder (2007)

Michael Ross

The generation to which Joe and Josephine Crowshoe belonged spanned more than the length of their lifetimes. That generation fought heroically in world wars and at the same time raised children under a paternalistic federal regime that denied both a culture and a heritage. The Crowshoes regained their heritage and shared it with the larger community, gaining respect from all the people with whom they were in contact and becoming articulate representatives and the holders of stories, legends, and customs. The interviews in Weasel Tail track not just their personal stories but the stories of a people who insisted on being recognized and a culture born out of the land of southern Alberta. Paralleling the interviews, Mike Ross has included historical photographs and documentation of a world and people who are a rich part of Alberta’s history.

Published by NeWest Press

https://newestpress.com/books/weasel-tail

  • Biography; Memoir; Ebook; History; Indigenous; Minority & Racial Issues; Nonfiction

 

Good Intentions Gone Awry  (2006)

Jan Hare and Jean Barman

Emma Crosby’s letters to family and friends in Ontario shed light on a critical era and bear witness to the contribution of missionary wives. They mirror the hardships and isolation she faced as well as her assumptions about the supremacy of Euro-Canadian society and of Christianity. They speak to her “good intentions” and to the factors that caused them to “go awry.” The authors critically represent Emma’s sincere convictions towards mission work and the running of the Crosby Girls’ Home (later to become a residential school), while at the same time exposing them as a product of the times in which she lived. They also examine the roles of Native and mixed-race intermediaries who made possible the feats attributed to Thomas Crosby as a heroic male missionary persevering on his own against tremendous odds.

Published By UBC Press

* 2006, Commended – Book Writing Competition on BC History, British Columbia Historical Federation; 2006, Short-listed – Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Book Prize, BC Book Prizes

https://www.ubcpress.ca/good-intentions-gone-awry

  • Canadian History; Women’s Studies; Native Studies; Religious Studies; Missiology: Canadian History; Gender and Sexuality; Indigenous Studies

 

Hidden in Plain Sight:  Contributions of Aboriginal Peoples to Canadian Identity and Culture Volume 1 (2005)

David Newhouse and Cora J. Voyageur

The history of Aboriginal people in Canada taught in schools and depicted in the media tends to focus on Aboriginal displacement from native lands and the consequent social and cultural disruptions they have endured. Collectively, they are portrayed as passive victims of European colonization and government policy, and, even when well intentioned, these depictions are demeaning and do little to truly represent the role Aboriginal peoples have played in Canadian life. Hidden in Plain Sight adds another dimension to the story, showing the extraordinary contributions Aboriginal peoples have made – and continue to make – to the Canadian experience.

From treaties to contemporary arts and literatures, Aboriginal peoples have helped to define Canada and have worked to secure a place of their own making in Canadian culture. For this volume, editors David R. Newhouse, Cora J. Voyageur, and Daniel J.K. Beavon have brought together leading scholars and other impassioned voices, and together, they give full treatment to the Aboriginal contribution to Canada’s intellectual, political, economic, social, historic, and cultural landscapes. Included are profiles of several leading figures such as actor Chief Dan George, artist Norval Morrisseau, author Tomson Highway, activist Anna Mae Pictou Aquash, and politician Phil Fontaine, among others. Canada simply would not be what it is today without these contributions. The first of two volumes, Hidden in Plain Sight is key to understanding and appreciating Canadian society and will be essential reading for generations to come.

Published By the University of Toronto Press

https://utorontopress.com/ca/hidden-in-plain-sight-8

  • Indigenous History; Indigenous Politics; Political Science; Social Inequality; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies

 

Ties Undone:  A Gendered and Racial Analysis of the Impact of the 1885 Northwest Rebellion in the Saskatchewan District (2004)

Erin Jodi Millions

Master’s Thesis Submission, in the Department of History at the University of Saskatchewan based on research about the Northwest Rebellion in the Saskatchewan District.  Her research is based on personal papers, government and Hudson’s Bay Company records, and oral histories.  The study finds a correlation between race and gender with how “white, First Nations, Métis, and mixed- blood men and women experienced both the conflict itself and its aftermath”

Published By the University of Saskatchewan

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/55300919.pdf

  • Indigenous Colonization; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples; Métis; General History; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies; Northwest Rebellion

 

Children, teachers and Schools in the History of British Columbia (2003)

Jean Barman and Mona Gleason

The second edition explores the myriad ways that education, broadly defined, molds each of us in profound and enduring ways. Laid against the supporting scaffolding of modern critical theory, the chapters offer cutting edge perspectives on going to school in British Columbia. How has education been tailored by race, class and gender? How do representations of schools and schooling change over time and whose interests are served? What echoes of current tensions can we hear in the past? Children, Teachers and Schools offers a glimpse of the deep contradictions inherent in an experience that we all share.

Published By Brush Education Inc.

https://www.brusheducation.ca/books/children-teachers-and-schools-in-the-history-of-british-columbia

  • Education; Race; Class; gender

 

Playing Dead:  A Contemplation Concerning the Artic ( Landmark Edition) (2003)

Rudy Weibe

Playing Dead: A Contemplation Concerning the Arctic, by two-time Governor General’s Award-winner Rudy Wiebe, is the first book in NeWest’s Landmark Editions Series. First released in 1989, this collection won the Alberta Culture Non- Fiction Award.These essays take a critical look at the history, mystery, and spirituality of a region that Wiebe would have us see as a vital aspect of our Canadianism, one we ignore at the peril of our nationhood.

https://newestpress.com/books/playing-dead-a-contemplation-concerning-the-arctic

  • Indigenous; Nonfiction

 

Unsettling Narratives:  Postcolonial Readings of Children’s Literature  (2003)

Clare Bradford

In this new collection of stories, Dene Elder George Blondin defines medicine Children’s books seek to assist children to understand themselves and their world. Unsettling Narratives: Postcolonial Readings of Children’s Literature demonstrates how settler-society texts position child readers as citizens of postcolonial nations, how they represent the colonial past to modern readers, what they propose about race relations, and how they conceptualize systems of power and government.

Clare Bradford focuses on texts produced since 1980 in Canada, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand and includes picture books, novels, and films by Indigenous and non-Indigenous publishers and producers. From extensive readings, the author focuses on key works to produce a thorough analysis rather than a survey. Unsettling Narrativesopens up an area of scholarship and discussion—the use of postcolonial theories—relatively new to the field of children’s literature and demonstrates that many texts recycle the colonial discourses naturalized within mainstream cultures.

Published By Wilfrid Laurier University Press

https://www.wlupress.wlu.ca/Books/U/Unsettling-Narratives

  • Children’s Literature; Canadian Literature; Literary Criticism; Colonization; Colonial Depictions

 

Skins:  Contemporary Indigenous Writing (2000)

Katerik- Akiwezie- Damm & Josie Douglas

Drawing on a wide range of Indigenous cultures and artistic traditions from Canada, the United States, Australia and Aotearoa – New Zealand, skins is an exciting new addition to Indigenous literature in print. Among celebrated names like Maria Campbell (Halfbreed), Alootook Ipellie (Arctic Dreams and Nightmares), Sally Morgan (My Place), Patricia Grace (Potiki), Sherman Alexie (Smoke Signals), Linda Hogan (Seeing through the Sun and Mean Spirit), Thomas King (Green Grass, Running Water), Louise Erdrich (Tracks) and Witi Ihimaera (Bulibasha), skins also presents some of the brightest emerging Indigenous talent from around the world. These writers have given us classic works and daring innovation; they are marking out new trails for the writers who will follow. And, as these pages show, they are producing some of the most inspiring beautiful and provocative writing anywhere.

Published by Kegedonce Press

https://kegedonce.com/bookstore/item/36-skins.html

  • Contemporary Indigenous Writing, Fiction: Indigenous Peoples; Literature; Canada; New Zealand; United States Australia

 

Sojourners and Sundogs:  First Nations Fiction (1999)

Lee Maracle

This combined volume features two of Lee Maracle’s best loved works, Sojourner’s Truth and Other Stories (1990) and Sundogs (1992), with a foreword by Native American poet Joy Harjo. 
Sojourner’s Truth is layered with unresolved human dilemmas-daring and imaginative, crossing cultures and generations, weaving together history, fiction, and a deep personal knowledge of Native American lives. 
Sundogs is an intimate look at one family during the high intensity of the Mohawk Warrior Society’s defiant stand at Oka.

                Published by Raincoast Books

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/347192.Sojourners_and_Sundogs

  • Mohawk; Warrior Societies; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal Communities; Culture; Canada

 

The Spirit of the Alberta Indian Treaties (1999)

Richard Price

Government and First Nations leaders have tended to operate within two different systems of knowledge and perception regarding treaty rights issues in Canada. While First Nations emphasize the original spirit or intent of an agreement, government stresses the letter of the agreement. The Spirit of the Alberta Indian Treaties has long been acknowledged as an authoritative source for both oral and documentary perspectives on Alberta treaties. It has been twice cited in landmark decisions by the Supreme Court of Canada since its original publication in 1979. Expanded, and with a new introduction by Richard Price, this third edition supports a growing understanding between leaders of government and First Nations people in Alberta and Canada.

Published by University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/348-9780888643278-spirit-of-the-alberta-indian-treaties

  • Native Studies; History; Canada; General; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Law and Society

 

Through the Mackenzie Basin:  An Account of the Signing of Treaty 8  and the Scrip Commission 1899 (1999)

Charles Mair

Edited by David W. Leonard and Brian Calliou

When Through the Mackenzie Basin was published in 1908, it became an immediate success as an adventure book on the unsettled regions of Northwest Canada. Many of the issues the book addresses are still topical and contentious, a century after the signing of Treaty 8. In this new edition, David Leonard’s introduction puts Mair’s work into its historical context, while Brian Calliou’s introduction adds a First Nations perspective. Charles Mair’s first-hand account of the signing of Treaty No. 8 at Lesser Slave Lake in 1899 and the distribution of scrip in the District of Athabaska “has come to constitute the most detailed published source for the interpretation of these events,” albeit from Mair’s imperial perspective, notes Leonard, as “a government supporter, ardent Canadian nationalist and firm believer in the British institutions.” This edition also includes the complete text of Treaty No. 8 including signatories, the “Order In Council Ratifying Treaty No. 8,” and “The Report of Commissioners for Treaty No. 8.”

Published By The University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/213-9780888643261-through-the-mackenzie-basin

  • Indigenous; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples; B&W Photos; Canada; General History; Native Studies; Indigenous Studies

 

An Anthology of Canadian Native Literature in English (1998)

Daniel Davis Moses, Terry Goldie & Armand Garnet Ruffo

Twenty years after the publication of its groundbreaking first edition, this collection continues to provide the most comprehensive coverage of Canadian Native literature available in one volume. Emphasizing the importance of the oral tradition, the anthology offers a diverse selection of songs, short stories, poems, plays, letters, and essays crafted by exceptional writers from First Nation, Inuit, and Métis communities across Canada.

Published By Oxford University Press

https://utorontopress.com/ca/shingwauk-s-vision-3

  • Literature; Native Canadian; Indigenous Peoples; Native Studies; English Canada; Canadians

 

Sing the Brave Song (1998)

Judith Ennamorato

Sing the Brave Song is a dynamic and comprehensive scrutiny of the historic relationship between Indian people, the church, and the vast repercussions endured by former students of Indian residential schools in Canada. Judith Ennamorato’s method of reporting aboriginal traditions is absorbing and potent. From first-time interviews, the reader will see through the eyes of Indian children who were culturally and geographically removed from their homes and families by force; spending as long as ten months a year at institutions where they were forbidden, under threat of corporal punishment, to speak their own language, the only language they knew.

Published By Raven Press Books

https://isbndb.com/book/9780968448908

  • Residential School; Substance Abuse; Native Studies; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Native Studies

 

Stolen from Our Embrace:  The Abduction of First Nations Children and the Restoration of Aboriginal Communities (1998)

Suzanne Fournier, Ernie Crey & David Neel

This important and timely book is a balance of the most gruesome elements of assimilation: church-run schools, the child welfare system, survivors of sexual abuse, and Foetal Alcohol Syndrome counter-balanced against heroic stories of children who survived, fought back, and found their way home.

Harrrowing stories are presented wherever possible in the first person, by Fournier, a journalist, and Cree, a B.C native spokesperson and activist, and a stolen child himself. The final message is optimistic, suggesting that redress and reconciliation could enrich the entire country by creating healthy aboriginal communities.

Published by Dauglas & McIntyre

*Winner of the BC Book Prize Hubert-Evans Prize for Nonfiction

http://www.douglas-mcintyre.com/book/stolen-from-our-embrace

  • Current Affairs; Social Science; Anthropology; Indigenous Studies; Native Studies

 

Their Example Showed Me the Way/ Kwayask ê-kî-pê-kiskinowâpahtihicik (1997)

Emma Minde

Emma Minde’s portraits of the family into which she was given in marriage more than sixty years ago are instructive and touching. She offers rare insight into a life history guided by two powerful forces: the traditional world of the Plains Cree and the influence of the Catholic missions.

Published By University of Alberta Press

http://www.uap.ualberta.ca/titles/202-9780888642912-their-example-showed-me-the-way-kwayask-e-ki-pe-kiskinowapahtihicik

  • Biography; Autobiography; general; Oral History; Foreign Language Study; Native American Languages; Indigenous Studies; Language Studies

 

Many Tender Ties (1996)

Sylvia Van Kirk

Sexual encounters between Indian women and the fur traders of the North West and Hudson’s Bay Companies are generally thought to have been casual and illicit in nature. This illuminating book reveals instead that Indian-white marriages, sanctioned “after the custom of the country,” resulted in many warm and enduring family unions. These were profoundly altered by the coming of the white women in the 1820s and 1830s.

Published by University of Oklahoma Press

http://www.oupress.com/ECommerce/Book/Detail/680/many%20tender%20ties

  • American Indian; Women’s Studies; Gender Studies; History; Fur Trade

 

Buried in the Silence (1995)

Connie Sampson

The inquiry into the killing of Leo LaChance left many unanswered questions. Journalist Connie Sampson examines the life and death of LaChance, his brother’s search for truth, and the inquiry that followed his death.

Published by NeWest Press

https://newestpress.com/books/buried-in-the-silence

  • Indigenous; Minority & Racial Issues; Nonfiction

 

First Nations Education in Canada:  The Circle Unfolds (1995)

Marie Battiste eds. & Jean Barman eds.

Written mainly by First Nations and Metis people, this book examines current issues in First Nations education.

Published By UBC Press

https://www.ubcpress.ca/first-nations-education-in-canada

  • Aboriginal Education; Education; Indigenous Studies; Sociology

 

Voices of the Plains Cree (1995)

Edward Ahenakew & Ruths Buck eds.

Chief Thunderchild’s stories of a fierce and vanished freedom are reprinted here as he told them to Edward Ahenakew in 1923.

https://uofrpress.ca/Books/V/Voice-of-the-Plains-Cree

  • Indigenous Peoples; Thunderchild; History; Oral Traditions; Memoirs: Canadian Plains Studies

 

Canada’s First Nations: A History of Founding Peoples from Earliest Times, Forth Edition (1992)

Olive Patricia Dickason and David T. McNab

Canada’s First Nations is a comprehensive history of Canada’s original inhabitants. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines techniques from history, anthropology, archaeology, biology, sociology, and political science, the story of the more than 50 First Nations of Canada is carefully woven together. A central argument in the text is that Amerindians and Inuit have responded to persistent colonial pressures through attempts at co-operation, episodes of resistance, and politically sophisticated efforts to preserve their territory and culture. The fourth edition has been fully updated to include current topics such as the effects of global warming on the Innu, the Ipperwash Inquiry, and the Caledonia land claims dispute. This is a text that transcends the familiar and narrow focus on Native-White relations to identify the history of the First Nations as a separate and proud tradition.

 Published By Oxford University Press

http://www.oupcanada.com/catalog/9780195428926.html

  • History; Canada; General; Native Studies; History; Native American; Canadian History; Indigenous Studies; Treaties: Ethnohistory

 

Writing the Circle:  Native Women of Western Canada (1990)

Jeanne Perreault eds. & Sylvia Vance eds.

Stories, poetry, essays, and biographical pieces from western and northwestern Canadian Native women make available seldom-heard voices of strength, resolution, anger, sorrow, wit, laughter, and tenderness.

Published by NeWest Press

https://newestpress.com/books/writing-the-circle-native-women-of-western-canada

  • Stories; Essays; Biographical; Indigenous Women; Canadian Native Women

 

Prison of Grass:  Canada from a Native Point of View (1989)

Howard Adams

Originally published in 1975, this important book is now back in print in a revised and updated edition. Since its first publication it has become a classic of revisionist history. Bringing a Native viewpoint to the settlement of the West, Howard Adam’s book shook its readers. What Native people had to say for themselves was quite different from the convenient picture of history that even the most sympathetic books by white authors had presented. Until Adams’s book, the cultural, historical, and psychological aspects of colonialism for Native people had not been explored in depth. In Prison of Grass Adams objects to the popular historical notion that Natives were warring savages, without government, seeking to be civilized. He contrasts the official history found in the federal government’s documents with the unpublished history of the Indian and Métis people. In this new edition Howard Adams brings the latest statistics to bear on his arguments and provides a new Preface.

Published By Fifth House

https://www.fifthhousepublishers.ca/Detail/0920079512

  • Native Studies; Political Science; Canadian History; Native American; Indigenous Peoples; Indigenous Studies; Law and Society; History; Colonization

 

Northern Frontier Northern Homeland:  The Report of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry:  Volume One  (1977)

Mr. Justice Thomas R. Berger

This is Volume One of a two volume report.  It deals with the board social economic and environmental impacts that a gas pipeline and energy corridor would have in the Mackenzie Valley and the Western Arctic.  In it certain basic recommendations are made.  Volume Two will set out the terms and conditions that should be imposed if a pipeline is built.

Published By Supply and Services Canada

https://www.pwnhc.ca/extras/berger/report/BergerV1_Content_e.pdf

  • Native Studies; Art; Mackenzie Valley; Economic Impact; Environmental Impacts; Pipeline; Indigenous Studies, Social Impact; Western Artic; History

Resources

Reconciliation and Residential Schools

 

Moving Forward:  A Collection About Truth and Reconciliation (2016)

Tracey MacDonald

Moving Forward: A Collection about Truth and Reconciliation supports the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s call to action in this 88-page anthology from McGraw-Hill Ryerson’s iLit Series. This collection includes short stories, poems, essays, and art created by First Nations, Inuit, and Métis authors and artists on the topics of truth and reconciliation as they relate to residential schools. Each selection includes Before, During, and After questions and activities that support English Language Arts grades 10 to 12 curricula from across the country. The volume contains a speech written by Justice Murray Sinclair about the meaning of reconciliation. Poetry includes I Am Graffiti by Leanne Simpson, Mechanic by Louise B. Halfe, and The Same as Trees by Nicola I. Campbell. The collection includes two memoir excerpts by Isabelle Knockwook and Sheila Watt-Cloutier. Short Stories by Drew Hayden Taylor and Joseph Boyden are included. Richard Wagamese and Niigonwedom James Sinclair each contribute personal essays. Artwork includes pieces by Tracey Anthony and Carey Newman.  Steven Keewatin Sanderson’s graphic story effectively explores Rock Bottom themes in this colour comic strip using a limited amount of text. Savannah Simon provides an interview about her efforts to support learning Mi’kmaq in contemporary settings. This volume is an outstanding and relevant collection for Canadian students addressing the TRC’s Call to Action through literature.

Published by McGraw Hill Education

https://www.mheducation.ca/literacycanada/portfolio/moving-forward/

  • Reconciliation; Residential School; TRC; ELA; Lesson Plans; Activiies; Calls To Action; Literature

 

Residential Schools and Reconciliation: A Bibliography of Resources (2016)

Saskatchewan Teachers Federation

A comprehensive list of teaching resources, books, activities and articles based on the themes of Residential Schools and Reconciliation

Published by Saskatchewan teachers Federation

https://www.stf.sk.ca/sites/default/files/bibliography/bibliography_residential_schools_reconciliation.pdf

  • Residential Schools; Saskatchewan; Bibliography; Reconciliation; Family; Culture; Tradition; Native Canadian; Indigenous Peoples; TRC: Churches

 

Secret Path: Lesson Plan Templates (2016)

Gord Downie

Illustrated by Jeff Lemire

Secret Path is a ten song digital download album by Gord Downie with a graphic novel by illustrator Jeff Lemire that tells the story of Chanie “Charlie” Wenjack, a twelve-year-old boy who died in flight from the Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School fifty years ago.

Chanie, misnamed Charlie by his teachers, was a young boy who died on October 22, 1966, walking the railroad tracks, trying to escape from the Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School to return home. Chanie’s home was 400 miles away. He didn’t know that. He didn’t know where it was, nor how to find it, but, like so many kids—more than anyone will be able to imagine—he tried.

Chanie’s story is Canada’s story. We are not the country we thought we were. History will be re-written. We are all accountable. Secret Path acknowledges a dark part of Canada’s history—the long suppressed mistreatment of Indigenous children and families by the residential school system—with the hope of starting our country on a road to reconciliation. Every year as we remember Chanie Wenjack, the hope for Secret Path is that it educates all Canadians young and old on this omitted part of our history, urging our entire nation to play an active role in the preservation of Indigenous lives and culture in Canada.

The next hundred years are going to be painful as we come to know Chanie Wenjack and thousands like him—as we find out about ourselves, about all of us—but only when we do can we truly call ourselves, “Canada.”

Proceeds from Secret Path will be donated to The Gord Downie Secret Path Fund for Truth and Reconciliation via The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) at The University of Manitoba.

Published By Simon & Schuster Canada

https://www.downiewenjack.ca/learning/secret-path-learning-resources

  • First Nations, Residential Schools,TRC; Reconciliation; Relationships, Indigenous World Views; Culture and Identity: State Violence; Land; Law and Treaties

 

About the Project (2015)

FNESC

The Indian Residential Schools and Reconciliation Teacher Resource Guides, developed by the First Nations Schools Association (FNSA) and the First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC), were inspired by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s recommendation that departments of education develop age-appropriate educational materials about residential schools for use in public education.

These unique, BC-specific, resources for grades 5, 10, 11 and 12 use age-appropriate literature, archival resources, and videos to increase students’ understanding of the historical context of residential schools and to develop students’ awareness about the reconciliation process as a way to move us all forward.

Importantly, these resources are not just for First Nations students, but are intended for students of all cultural backgrounds.

Published by FNESC

http://www.fnesc.ca/about-the-project/

  • Stolen Lives; Biographical; Residential School; Teaching resource; History; Human Behaviour; Reconciliation; TRC Calls To Action

 

From Apology to Reconciliation (2015)

Manitoba education and Training

From Apology to Reconciliation: Residential School Survivors was developed in response to the Government of Canada’s formal apology to Aboriginal people who attended residential schools. The project was created to help Manitoba students in Grades 9 and 11 understand the history of the residential school experience, its influence on contemporary Canada, and our responsibilities as Canadian citizens.

 Published by Manitoba Education

https://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/socstud/far/doc/full_doc.pdf

  • Residential Schools; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal Communities; Churches; Culture: TRC; Apology; Manitoba

 

Grade 5 Indian residential Schools and Reconciliation (2015)

FNESC

These learning resources are designed to help Grade Five students attain an understanding of the history of the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people over Canada’s history. The primary learning resources are published literature, enabling a cross-curricular approach employing both Language Arts and Social Studies learning standards.

While the instructional activities are presented in a structured format that is an example of how they may be incorporated, they are intended to be flexible in their use. They allow for the application of both a First Peoples Pedagogy and the BC Social Studies Curriculum.

The Grade 5 lessons draw upon literature resources that help introduce the subject of residential schools in age-appropriate ways. 

Published By FNESC

http://www.fnesc.ca/grade5irsr/

  • Stolen Lives; Biographical; Residential School; Teaching resource; History; Human Behaviour; Reconciliation; TRC Calls To Action

 

Grade 10 Indian residential Schools and Reconciliation (2015)

FNESC

These learning resources are designed to help Grade Ten students attain an understanding of the history of the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people over Canada’s history.  They are for the instruction of youth from all cultural backgrounds, not just Aboriginal students.

While the instructional activities are presented in a structured format, they are intended to be flexible in their use. They allow for the application of both a First Peoples Pedagogy and the changing BC Curriculum.

The activities are designed to be adaptable and flexible. Teachers can follow the sequence of lessons, they can use particular lessons or sections as stand-alone activities, or they can adapt the activities to meet their own curriculum planning requirements and the learning needs of their students.

Published By FNESC

http://www.fnesc.ca/grade-10irsr/

  • Stolen Lives; Biographical; Residential School; Teaching resource; History; Human Behaviour; Reconciliation; TRC Calls To Action

 

Indian Residential School & Reconciliation:  Teachers Resource Guide Part One – The Documentary Evidence (2015)

FNESC

These Indian Residential Schools learning resources are designed to use an Inquiry approach to provide students in a number of Grade 11 and 12 courses with an understanding of the history of the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada.

These Indian Residential Schools learning resources are designed to use an inquiry approach to provide students in a number of Grade 11 and 12 courses with an understanding of the history of the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada.

The learning activities are based on the use of primary source materials. They allow for the application of both a First Peoples Pedagogy and the changing BC Curriculum.

Published by FNESC

http://www.fnesc.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/PUB-LFP-IRSR-11-12-Pt1-2015-07-WEB.pdf

  • Stolen Lives; Biographical; Residential School; Teaching resource; History; Human Behaviour; Reconciliation; TRC Calls To Action

 

Indian Residential School & Reconciliation:  Teachers Resource Guide Part Two- The Documentary Evidence (2015)

FNESC

These Indian Residential Schools learning resources are designed to use an inquiry approach to provide students in a number of Grade 11 and 12 courses with an understanding of the history of the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada.

These Indian Residential Schools learning resources are designed to use an inquiry approach to provide students in a number of Grade 11 and 12 courses with an understanding of the history of the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada.

The learning activities are based on the use of primary source materials. They allow for the application of both a First Peoples Pedagogy and the changing BC Curriculum.

Published by FNESC

http://www.fnesc.ca/grade-11-12-indian-residential-schools-and-reconciliation/

  • Stolen Lives; Biographical; Residential School; Teaching resource; History; Human Behaviour; Reconciliation; TRC Calls To Action

 

Stolen Lives:  The Indigenous Peoples of Canada and The Indian Residential School (2015)

Facing History and Ourselves

Stolen Lives is a program that walks students and teachers through an examination of the devastating legacy of Indian Residential Schools. Students make the essential connection between the history of Canada and their world today.

 Published by Facing History and Ourselves

https://www.facinghistory.org/stolen-lives-indigenous-peoples-canada-and-indian-residential-schools

  • Stolen Lives; Biographical; Residential School; Teaching resource; History; Human Behaviour; Reconciliation; TRC Calls to Action

 

Teachers Guide Red Wolf (2014)

Jennifer Dance

Life is changing for Canada’s Anishnaabe Nation and for the wolf packs that share their territory.

In the late 1800s, both Native people and wolves are being forced from the land. Starving and lonely, an orphaned timber wolf is befriended by a boy named Red Wolf. But under the Indian Act, Red Wolf is forced to attend a residential school far from the life he knows, and the wolf is alone once more. Courage, love and fate reunite the pair, and they embark on a perilous journey home. But with winter closing in, will Red Wolf and Crooked Ear survive? And if they do, what will they find?

 Published by Dundurn Publishers of Fine Books

* Moonbeam Children’s Book Award 2014; Forest of Reading, Shortlisted Silver Birch Awards; Shortlisted MYRCA Award 2016; Toronto  Public Library’s 2015 Great Reads for Kids Collection

https://www.dundurn.com/sites/default/files/supplementary/Red_Wolf_9781459736634_1.pdf

  • First Nations; Indian Act; Traditional Stories; Traditional First Nations; Native Peoples; Historical; Canadian

 

Legacy Of Hope: Tebatchiwmowin Activity Guide:  Promoting Awareness of the History and Legacy of the Indian  Residential School (2014)

Legacy of Hope Foundation

Tebatchimowin – an Algonquin word rooted in teboai, meaning truth. It is a complete account or report on an event or subject.

This resource consists of six activities, each of which examines an aspect of the history or legacy of the Residential School System. It is our hope that the information and activities will give both facilitators and participants the resources they need to examine the history of the Residential School System and to recognize the impact it has had, and continues to have, on generations of Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

                This guide was developed under the auspices of a joint Indian residential school commemoration project

between the Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health and the Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF).  Funding for this publication was provided by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (Truth and Reconciliation Commission Commemoration Fund).

 Published by Legacy of Hope

http://staging.legacyofhope.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Tebatchomowin_Guide_2014_web.pdf

  • Residential Schools; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal Communities; Churches; Culture; Facilitation Guide; TRC; Biographies; Canada

 

Day of The Apology:  Healing the Generatons Residential School Curriculum Gr. 9-12 (2013)

Nishnawbe Aski Nation

This curriculum aims to increase awareness of the residential school system as a major part of the European colonizing effort against Aboriginal peoples, resulting in significant intergenerational impacts.

Published By the Nishnawbe Aski Nation

http://rschools.nan.on.ca

  • Residential Schools; Nishnawbe Aski Nation; Residential School; Curriculum Guide; Native Canadian; Indigenous Peoples; TRC

 

From Apology to Reconciliation: Residential School Survivors:  A Guide for Grade 9 and 11 Social Studies Teachers in Manitoba (2013)

Manitoba Education and Training

From Apology to Reconciliation: Residential School Survivors was developed in response to the Government of Canada’s formal apology to Aboriginal people who attended residential schools. The project was created to help Manitoba students in Grades 9 and 11 understand the history of the residential school experience, its influence on contemporary Canada, and our responsibilities as Canadian citizens.

                Published by Manitoba Education

https://www.ubcpress.ca/treaty-promises-indian-reality

  • Federal Government; Reserves; Manitoba; Treaty; Residential School System; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal Communities; Churches; Culture; Facilitation Guide; TRC; Canada

 

100 Years of Loss- EDU-Kit and Teacher Bundle (2011)

Legacy of Hope Foundation

In 2010-2011 the Legacy of Hope Foundation began developing an education program targeted to Canadian youth aged 11-18. This program is designed to support educators and administrators in raising awareness and teaching about the history and legacy of residential schools – effectively providing practical tools that can be implemented in classrooms. These products come in response to demands from educators for complete in-class resources, and serve as an entry point to both the subject matter and to existing resources currently available at wherearethechildren.ca

The curriculum packages are comprised of videos including Survivor testimonies, a Teacher’s Guide with six customizable Lesson Plans (12-24 hrs of activities), teacher resources and extension activities. The Edu-kit package contains a wall-mounted timeline, and timeline in the more-compact teacher bundle is in booklet format.

Due to an overwhelming demand, our supply of the Edu-Kit  has been depleted. We do have a supply of the Teachers’ Bundle which is a smaller version of the Edu-Kit but without the vinyl timeline banners. Please contact us at: info@legacyofhope.ca for more information.

 Published by Legacy of Hope

http://100yearsofloss.ca/en/resources/

  • Residential Schools; Indigenous Peoples; Aboriginal Communities; Churches; Culture; Facilitation Guide; TRC; Biographies; Canada

 

Finding Our Way Home = Tr’ëhuhch’in näwtr’udäh’ą (2008)

Chris Clarke

Tr’ëhuhch’in näwtr’udäh’ą/ Finding Our Way Home ia a curriculum about Residential Schools in the Yukon that was co-created with a Group of Residential School survivors. 

Published By Tr’ond’k Hw’ch’in,

http://www.worldcat.org/title/trehuhchin-nawtrudaha-finding-our-way-home/oclc/320583664

  • Residential Schools; Yukon; Curriculum Guide; Intergenerational Trauma; Healing; History; Indigenous Studies; Culture; Racism; Identity

 

A Teacher’s Guide For 7 generations Series

Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair

The Teacher’s Guide for the 7 generations series is a free resource.  The guise Includes instruction and activities for each title in the 7 Generations series.

Published By Portage and Main Press

https://www.portageandmainpress.com/product/teachers-guide-for-7-generations-series/

  • 7 Generations Series; Teaching Guide; Lessons

 

AFN Toolkit

Assembly of First Nations

The Assembly of First Nations has developed the It’s Our Time First Nations Tool Kit as the basis of a comprehensive strategy to reach out to First Nations students, teachers, schools, communities and the Canadian public at large. The resource is designed to bring together First Nations and non-First Nations people and foster a spirit of cooperation, understanding, and action.

Published By the Assembly of First Nations

http://www.afn.ca/education/toolkit/

  • First Nations; Indigenous Peoples; Lessons Plans; Activities; Provicial Curriculum

 

Teaching Strategies and Graphic Organizers that Support the Reader: “ Before, During and After” the Read

Donna Klockars

Educational resources for publications written by Donna Klockers.

Published By Stz’uminus Education

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/574f05e91bbee0a412270a38/t/5779af9520099e9ea5956957/1467592603071/Teaching+Strategies+that+Support+the+Reader.pdf

Indigenous; Residential Schools; Siblings; Family; Relationships; Stz’Uminus; History; Canadian History; Indigenous Peoples